Posts Tagged ‘The Brian Jonestown Massacre’

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When we first met The Brian Jonestown Massacre some years ago in Anton’s studio in Berlin, we were blown away by the bands’ live sound and not able to record it the best way possible. In October of 2018, the band played a sold-out two-hour-show in London, in the O2 Kentish Town. We took a car, started in Cologne, Germany, took the ferry, drove to London and shot this.

If you want to know more about The Brian Jonestown Massacre – feel free to listen to their 18 studio records, lots of EP’s, or watch the fantastic rock documentary “Dig!”.

This recording shows that they are still one of the most exciting live bands around – you can feel the energy, they sound incredible.

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BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE  are set to release the first of two expected new albums in 2018
‘Something Else’ Is out on  Out On 1st June 2018, On his own imprint A Recordings.

Hear first single ‘Hold That Thought’

Brian Jonestown Massacre will release the first of 2 new albums in 2018; ‘Something Else’ is out on 1st June on A Recordings. The album, which is available on 180grm white vinyl, was recorded and produced at Anton Newcombe’s Cobra Studio in Berlin. The second album of 2018 is self-titled and will be out in September, more details to come on that at a later date…

‘Something Else’ is the Brian Jonestown Massacre’s 17th full-length release, the style of which is less experimental than more recent records and harks back to the traditional sound of the band. Recorded between 2017 and 2018, this 9-track album will please old and new fans alike.

Following a relatively quiet 2017 – the band did a tour of the US East & West Coasts and Mexico City to support last year’s album ‘Don’t Get Lost’ – the band have now announced tours of the USA, Canada and Australasia, and will shortly be announcing a tour throughout the UK and Europe.

Anton Newcombe has been a very busy man these past 4 years, having released 3 critically acclaimed Brian Jonestown Massacre albums and an EP, 1 soundtrack album and 1 album with Tess Parks, the follow up to which will be released in between the forthcoming BJM albums this year. All releases were fully recorded and produced at Anton’s studio.

The Brian Jonestown Massacre track ‘Straight Up and Down’ was used as the theme tune to the multi-award winning Boardwalk Empire. Anton penned the soundtrack for ‘Moon Dogs’, a film directed by multi-BAFTA nominated Philip John (Svengali, Downton Abbey, Being Human).

Track Listing
1. Hold That Thought
2. Animal Wisdom
3. Psychic Lips
4. Skin and Bones
5. My Poor Heart
6. My Love
7. Who dreams of cats?
8. Fragmentation
9. Silent Stream

‘a reaffirmation of their cult status.’  – Guardian
‘’Twenty years of enthusiastic participation in the rock’n’roll lifestyle may have cemented Anton Newcombe’s legend, but sobriety – he’s been clean for five years – clearly suits him.’ – Q Magazine
‘BJM delicately balance classic 60’s songwriting and woozy shoegaze…. they still inhabit a different, more enticing cosmos to their peers.’ – Mojo
Anton Newcombe is one of those rare artists who manages to stay prolific without compromising his output.’ – NME
‘astonishingly relevant in psych-obsessed 2014’ – Time Out
‘As notorious as he is prolific, Anton Newcombe has been creating shoegaze-inflected psychedelic jams for the best part of 25 years.’ – Record Collector
‘Anton Newcombe’s garage psych troupe excel on 14th LP’ – Guitarist
‘BJM are a fucking great band.’ – CRACK
‘Long Live Anton Newcombe, we still and will always adore you.’ – 1883

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To study Joel Gion is to study the mystery and history of rock and roll itself. Rock and roll itself is an element indefinable at its core, no matter how deeply one investigates either the mystery or the history – in fact, it’s likely to gain less definition the further one delves.

Joel Gion himself is an element indefinable at his core, no matter how deeply one investigates either his mystery or his history (be it time spent with The Brian Jonestown Massacre, the celluloid anti-hero working out some kinks in the documentary “Dig!” or simply his repeat rankings in the ongoing competition for “Coolest Motherfucker on Earth”) – in fact, he’s likely to gain less definition the further one delves.

With regard to his lush new eponymous album on Beyond Beyond Is Beyond Records, we should all be so lucky to suffer from such a lack of definition. the album is almost void of definition completely. In its place, we find instantly invigorating hooks, we find an unhurried pace matched with an unworried tone, we find a captivating collection of California calm mixed with self-command, with General Gion standing at the helm of an army of talented musicians, flutes and reverb pedals at the ready.

Unraveling the history and mystery of rock and roll is half the fun, and Joel Gion has been responsible for far more than his fair share of fun. The other half of the fun is giving yourself over to that same mystery and history, wherever it may take you, definitions be damned.

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Image of Brian Jonestown Massacre - Don't Get Lost

“Don’t Get Lost” was recorded & produced at Anton’s new Cobra Studio in Berlin between March 2016 & October 2016. It is the 16th full length release. With band members Ricky Maymi , Dan Allaire , Collin Hegna & Ryan Van Kriedt .Also Emil Nikolaisen from the Norwegian band Serena-Maneesh & Pete Fraser (The Pogues .New Young Pony Club) on saxophone joins the band on this album , plus vocal performances from Tim Burgess (Charlatans) , Tess Parks and Shaun Rivers .

A new dynamic is heard on this album mixing the shoegaze/psychedelic sound with more experimental twists, on some tracks you might hear PIL (Metalbox) , Primal Scream , or even Ornette Coleman . 14 tracks that will twist and turn through the known and unknown Brian Jonestown Massacre . In 2016 The band released 2 singles and the critically acclaimed Third World Pyramid .

Image of All Them Witches - Sleeping Through The War

Produced by Dave Cobb (Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson, Rival Sons) and mixed / engineered by UK-bred young-gun Eddie Spear, All Them Witches’ ‘Sleeping Through The War’ is the quartet’s most bold and well-crafted record to date.
The album’s creation marks the first time in the band’s history that a record was written before entering the studio. This process allowed for an alignment of the band’s art, desire and time. Convening in Nashville for only six days after a year of relentlessly touring their New West Records debut ‘Dying Surfer Meets Their Maker’, the band’s spirit coalesced in a rhythm of statement and melody that simply needs to be heard… repeatedly.

With the guidance of Cobb and Spear, ‘Sleeping Through The War’ captures the truest energy of the group, full blast, fun and contemplative. The record was made with volume in mind. ‘Sleeping Through The War’ is meant to be played loud, cranked up and without reservation. Feel it live through your stereo system or listen to it speak in tongues through your headphones.
The sounds are nothing without the songs and the songs are nothing without the lyrics. This record is a result of constant touring, world travel, overstimulated / divided humanity and a learning of awareness and compassion.
“They are the real deal – psychedelic blues-rock warriors who pray at the altar of Black Sabbath, space out like Pink Floyd and shred away their bummers like Blue Cheer.”

Image of Eyelids - 854

Principal songwriters John Moen & Chris Slusarenko (BOSTON SPACESHIPS, DECEMBERISTS, ELLIOTT SMITH, STEPHEN MALKMUS, DAMIEN JURADO) have turned inwards to their loves of New Zealand/Flying Nun guitar buzz, their teenage LA Paisley Underground obsessions, haunts of early Athens and all things beautiful, lopsided and rock. Along with members Jonathan Drews (guitar), Jim Talstra (bass) and Paulie Pulvirenti (drums) they push & pull against each other’s songwriting, in a beautiful tension that just works.

Image of Sun Kil Moon - Common As Light And Love Are Red Valleys Of Blood

“‘Common As Light And Love Are Red Valleys Of Blood’, for the most part, captures events from January to August of this year and how I processed it all while traveling.
“[…] I’m blessed to have met the very talented Justin Broadrick and to have made these beautiful albums with him.
“These two new albums capture more than my reactions to mass murders or the passing of beloved heroes like David Bowie or Muhammad Ali. The Sun Kil Moon and Jesu/Sun Kil Moon albums are also full of love, humor, and my gratitude

Image of King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard - Flying Microtonal Banana

Geelong’s insuppressible King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard release their new album ‘Flying Microtonal Banana’ on Heavenly Recordings – the first of five albums they are set to release in 2017.

Talking about the making of Flying Microtonal Banana, Eric Moore of the band said: “Earlier this year we started experimenting with a custom microtonal guitar our friend Zak made for Stu. The guitar was modified to play in 24- TET tuning and could only be played with other microtonal instruments. We ended up giving everyone a budget of $200 to buy instruments and turn them microtonal. The record features the modified electric guitars, basses, keyboards and harmonica as well as a Turkish horn called a Zurna.”
Shimmering, hypnotic and propulsive and powered along, as ever, by the metronomic beat of two drummers, ‘Flying Microtonal Banana’ takes a subtle musical shift away from the frazzled freak-beat of its predecessor, ‘Nonagon Infinity’. Trance like, in parts clipped and concise yet deeply psychedelic, it reveals yet another musical side to a band seemingly in perpetual motion.

Perhaps one of the most exciting live bands out there right now, they appeared at both Green Man and End Of The Road festivals over the summer as well as playing sold-out London shows at the Electric Ballroom, Moth Club and The Electric during 2016. The band will bring their unrestrained and free-wheeling live show back to the UK in 2017.

Image of Peter Silberman - Impermanence - Bonus Disc Edition

While Impermanence is Peter Silberman’s first solo album, it could easily be thought of as a continuation of the emotional-spiritual odyssey begun through his work in The Antlers over the past decade. It travels some of the thornier terrain of the trio’s previous albums Hospice, Burst Apart, and Familiars, while carrying the conversation further down the path.
But much of what distinguishes Impermanence from its forebears can be attributed to an unexpected injury, which imposed upon the musician considerable time and space to ponder the finite.
A few years back, Peter Silberman developed a hearing impairment in his left ear that resulted in a temporarily total hearing loss, extraordinarily loud tinnitus, and an excruciating sensitivity to everyday noises. The condition required extensive rest and quiet, and in order to get that, he left his Brooklyn apartment for a more secluded setting in upstate New York.
The six songs have an economy of expression, the spaces between the words as important as the words themselves. Like the infamous Miles Davis quote: “It’s not the notes you play, it’s the notes you don’t play.”

As the writing neared completion, Silberman linked up with his long-time friend and collaborator, Nicholas Principe of Port St. Willow. Over the course of a few winter months, Principe engineered the album in his upstate People Teeth studio, contributing production throughout. Together, they carved out a sacred sonic space, elongating the distance between notes, between chords, utilizing minimal arrangements to allow breathing room.
But the album goes beyond experiments in ambience. It actually traces the stages of healing, as Silberman experienced them.

“The sequence charts a circular course between distress and peace,” he explains. “The final track returns you to the mood of the first by a wormhole through a single breath, split in half across the last and first seconds of the album. It mimics the cyclical nature of facing unexpected obstacles.”
“I hope Impermanence can provide comfort to people grappling with transition, while remaining honest about it. There’s no remedy for the unpredictable, and I want this record to reflect that, to offer an alternative way to think about changing circumstances.”

Image of The Feelies - In Between

New Jersey indie-rock pioneers The Feelies are celebrating their 40th anniversary with the release of “In Between”, their first album of all new material in over 6 years.
Whilst working the post Velvet Underground moves they’re so famous for, In Between brings interesting new ideas into the mix. The twin-guitar attack of songwriters and founders Glenn Mercer and Bill Million is still at the core of the group’s infectious sound, paired with the driving rhythmic team of drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman, with Brenda Sauter’s bass guitar proving a rock solid foundation.

“On the new record we did a lot of it at my house in my home studio with extra equipment, explains Mercer. “It’s the same room where we rehearsed. We’ve been here since we reformed and a little bit prior to taking the hiatus in the 90’s. So it’s a room we’re really familiar with and feel comfortable in. We also did some recording at an engineer’s studio, so it was all done very low key. We refer to it as “off the clock” when you’re not paying an hourly rate, so in that sense it was a lot more relaxed. I don’t think anyone would notice a drastic change in the sound or the vibe of the record. I think it sounds a lot more relaxed and laid back.”

“I think all of our albums reflect a certain degree of reaction to the work that we previously did and In Between is no exception,” continues Bill Million. “We liked the sounds and the feel of the demos for this album and we thought it would be difficult to capture that in a recording studio. So that was our starting point and it evolved in a much more relaxed way that loaned itself to more creative interplay. Time wasn’t a component. If you let it, music can take on a life of its own and we wanted to allow the songs to develop with that idea in mind.”

Formed in Haledon NJ in 1976, The Feelies have now released six albums – including their critically acclaimed and influential debut Crazy Rhythms, as well as playing concerts with The Patti Smith Group, REM, and Bob Dylan as well as touring with Lou Reed.
In 2008, The Feelies re-united after a 17 year hiatus to open for long time admirers Sonic Youth at Battery Park and then resurrected their tradition of playing low key gigs at strategic intervals throughout the year rather than doing lengthy tours. They signed with Bar/None the same year, who re-issued The Good Earth and Crazy Rhythms. Here Before was released in 2011 and marked The Feelies first studio album in nearly two decades.

Memories Are Now

Jesca Hoop’s fourth proper solo LP and first for Sub Pop is entitled “Memories Are Now”, a reference to the concept of seizing the day. With producer Blake Mills the album encompasses much of the range of her previous output, which routinely challenged the boundaries of indie rock and folk, encouraging a label more along the lines of unconventional singer/songwriter. It follows her excellent likewise free-spirited but more rustic duet album with Iron and Wire’s Sam Beam “Love Letter For Fire” by less than a year, and any new fans from that collaboration may well delight in its expressiveness right alongside established fans. The empowering title track, which opens the album, is spare yet pointed. Accompanied only by a pulsing bassline, tambourine, and Hoop’s own backing vocals, it plays like an offbeat anthem for the newly self-reliant (“Clear the way/I’m coming through/No matter what you say”). The whole record, in fact, is injected with a heavy dose of gumption and irreverence, a spirit that, deliberate or not, seems timely in the sociopolitical climate of early 2017. Speaking of sociopolitical, the playful “Simon Says” takes on mindless consumerism with campfire immediacy and a twisted twang (“When you don’t pick the words you choose/Involuntarily advertising for their enterprise”). Meanwhile, “Songs of Old” is a folky chamber piece with arguably the album’s best example of Hoop’s distinctive way around a melody or three within a single, haunting tune. Efficient arrangements mark this track and the rest, so much so that when “Unsaid” arrives with electric guitar riffs, more expansive percussion, and poly-rhythms, it hits like a prism.  “Memories Are Now” is exquisite-sounding while it contends with a songwriter who not only has a few things to get off her chest, but seems to make a call to action. With lyrics that reject “that old device called fear,” some will find the inspiration to be catching.

Wildly Idle (Humble Before the Void)

Known in certain circles for backing indie singer/songwriter Kevin Morby on his recent tour, guitarist Meg Duffy steps into the spotlight all on her own with “Wildly Idle” (Humble Before The World) , It’s her full-length debut as the band “Hand Habits” . A true bedroom project  or living room project, to be literal, the album was written, performed, recorded, and produced by Meg Duffy. The intimate set takes listeners behind closed doors with lyrics that refer to bathroom sinks and late-night invites. Frequent double-tracking makes Duffy’s melodic but conversational vocal style seem even more lost in thought past bedtime. Meanwhile, her floaty, psych-tinged guitar pop swirls into corners and wraps back around headphones. Tempos are ambling on tracks such as “Flower Glass” (“When I hold you like a flower/Hold you like an hourglass”), a melancholy reflection that, even without the suggestion of the title, sounds like a musical representation of stained glass. Sustained chords, mixed low, provide the glue for layered harmonic guitars that unroll one note at a time in irregular rhythms. Later, the whispered count-off to “Sun Beholds Me” leaves ample time to anticipate the next beat. Even a relatively brighter, brisker tune like “Nite Life” has the leisurely twang of slide guitar, spacy effects, and airy vocals. Three brief “scenes” are spread throughout the track list: “Great LA,” “Cowboy,” and “Time Hole.” Incorporating samples, each one is an atmospheric exercise in texture that relinquishes form, only reinforcing the dreamy, drifting feel of the album.

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The Brian Jonestown Massacre “Dropping Bombs On The Sun” is the final and third of 3 singles from the forthcoming album “Don’t Get Lost” to be released in February 2017. The first track Dropping Bombs On The Sun  features vocals by longtime collaborator Tess Parks, this track gives an idea of the changing rhythms of the Brian Jonestown Massacre for the new album. Of a mellow flow of strings and keyboards, with smoky vocals provided by Tess Parks. Geldenes Herz Menz features Pete Fraser (The Pogues .New Young Pony Club) on saxophone , both Dan Alliare (drums and Ricky Maymi (guitar) from the Brian Jonestown Massacre play on both tracks.

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“Caught In Still Life” is the debut album release from London band Vaults. Whilst not yet a household name the band have been quietly building momentum since signing to Virgin EMI in 2013. The album contains two songs which are very well known; One Last Night featured on the soundtrack to 50 Shades Of Grey and went to No.1 on iTunes in 20 countries. Secondly comes the bands beautiful version of Randy Crawford’s “One Day I’ll Fly Away” as featured in this year’s much anticipated John Lewis Christmas ad. The TV ad was viewed 7 million times in the first 24 hours. Also featured on the album are Cry No More and Premonitions, both of which featured heavily in the Channel 4 drama Glue. For fans of Kate Bush, Florence, London Grammar and Chvrches.

A Pink Sunset for No One

“A Pink Sunset For No One” is the follow-up to “Fantastic Planet” , the 2015 album from guitarist/filmmaker Sarah Lipstates solo project Noveller. While the album contains all of the hallmarks of Lipstate’s cinematic sound, such as gently drifting waves of droning guitars and slightly melancholy atmospheres, there seems to be more definition to her playing this time around, in some aspects.

She hasn’t exactly started writing pop songs, but at times there’s a bit more of a propulsion to her compositions, and the melodies feel more outlined than before. It’s hard to tell exactly what instruments or effects pedals she’s using, since the liner notes don’t reveal any of this information, but there are moments that sound like organs, and others that seem like sampled woodwinds (on closing track “Emergence”). On “Rituals,” there are even shades of vocals peeking out from the detached but swinging rhythm and post-punk-influenced chords. The album’s title track starts calmly, with chiming notes, before louder guitars burst out. While not quite as harshly distorted as some earlier of Novellers works like Red Rainbows, the album demonstrates that Lipstate is still masterful at applying heavier guitar effects at exactly the right moments, elevating the lush, dreamy atmospheres to an exciting next level. Standout track “Trails and Trials” does this as well, and her guitar playing sounds particularly close to early His Name Is Alive on this one. Without getting too gloomy, She creates haunted, mysterious atmospheres on tracks such as “Corridors,” which could easily be the theme to the next big horror or sci-fi series. With this her eighth proper solo album as Noveller,  Lipstate continues to push her otherworldly sound in fascinating new directions.

Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins

Is Chuck Prophet a storyteller who just happens to be a great musician? Or is he a talented songwriter and guitarist who also has a real gift for spinning tales? On 2017’s Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins, his 12th studio album, Prophet has managed to strike an ideal balance between the two sides, delivering a tuneful and engaging set that’s full of character sketches with a full complement of heart, soul, honesty, wit, and the details of a recognizable adult life. Prophet is capable of playfully imagining what it would be like to be the star of Nashville and Friday Night Lights (“If I Was Connie Britton”), then sharing the true story of a young man gunned down by the San Francisco police for no clear reason just a few tracks later (“Alex Nieto”). Both songs come off as smart, honest, and thoughtful despite their very different tone, and those adjectives apply to nearly every cut on this album. The current state of music is a recurring theme here, as evidenced by the title tune, “Bad Year for Rock and Roll,” “We Got Up and Played,” and “In the Mausoleum” (the latter an homage to the late Alan Vega of Suicide). But Prophet is just as interested in the lives of people in all sorts of trouble. A single mother and a gunman unexpectedly cross paths in “Killing Machine,” the author ponders the objects of his affection in “Your Skin” and “Coming Out in Code,” the peaks and valleys of romantic relationships are examined in “Open Up Your Heart,” and the Son of God’s consumer preferences get a rundown in “Jesus Was a Social Drinker.” Prophet and his studio band (including Tubes drummer Prairie Prince and co-producers Brad Jones and Matt Winegar on various instruments) give the melodies a rich, wide-ranging sound, and Prophet has rarely been better as a vocalist, finding the right tone on every track. Along with having one of the best titles of recent memory, “Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins” confirms that more than 25 years after making his solo debut, Chuck Prophet remains one of America’s strongest songwriters and recording artists, and he’s in great form here.

Outside (Briefly)

Froth have come a long way since their joke-band beginnings, weedy garage rock first album, and their initial foray into shoegaze on their 2014 album Bleak, which showed a great deal of promise with a batch of good songs and an impressively full sound. 2017’s Outside (Briefly) cashes in on that potential and ends up sounding like a great lost shoegaze/dream pop/experimental rock album of the early ’90s. Mixing the guitar overload of bands like My Bloody Valentine, the experimental nature of the Swirlies, and the hazy wistfulness of bands like Slowdive, Froth manage to ingest a ton of influences without sounding in thrall to any of them in particular. Lots of times on albums as stuck in the past as Outside (Briefly) is, the nostalgia factor weighs it down too much, the endless rounds of spot-the-influence make it impossible to actually enjoy the music as it happens, or the listener is so transported back in time that they’d rather listen to something old instead of the music Froth is making. None of that happens here. The band’s leader JooJoo Ashworth never succumbs to hero worship or pastiche. He and his cohorts (guitarist Nick Ventura, drummer Cameron Allen, and bassist Jeremy Katz) mix and match sounds, styles, and approaches like masters, never allowing the album to get predictable or obvious. Tracks like “Passing” defy the listener to pin down exactly what’s happening. It starts off as a raging shoegaze rocker that could have been lifted off an early Slumberland Records 45, then suddenly shifts into a droning Motorik jam where Ashworth and Ventura’s guitars noodle and dance like hippie girls at a Phish concert. After a few minutes of zoning out, the song crashes back into life before ending in a blast of feedback. It’s an exhilarating arrangement and serves notice that the band isn’t about to be pinned down. They can do slow noise rock ballads (“Petals”) that start off sparse and scattered sounding, with Ashworth’s fragile vocals up front, then finish in waves of synth strings and organ swirls or do simple blown-out shoegaze (“Romance Distractions”). They nail both abrasive JAMC-sleek rockers (“New Machine”) and fuzzy indie pop (“Sensitive Girl”) with equal aplomb. Synth pop drones (“Contact”) sound just as good as the songs that mix new wave melodies with noise pop guitars (“Show a Flower a Candle and It Grows”). Basically, everything Ashworth and crew try on Outside (Briefly) works a charm, sounding like the entire history of noisy indie pop wrapped up in one constantly surprising, effortlessly appealing ball of sound. Anyone who has a soft spot for sensitive pop songs played by loud guitars that are run through a ton of effects will want to check the album out. It may not make people forget the past mighty heroes of noise, but a few spins through Outside (Briefly) is enough to make room in the shoegaze/dream pop pantheon for Froth.

As the long term percussionist of The Brian Jonestown Massacre, Joel Gion has helped pioneer the current Psychedelic Rock movement. Now as a songwriter, he steps up to the mic to deliver his own tunes

Released January 27, 2017
Written by Joel Gion
Joel Gion: vocal, rhythm guitars, maracas, tambourine
Collin Hegna: bass, guitar, backing vocals
Paul Dillon: guitars
Brian Gardner: drums
Written by Joel Gion

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BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE

The Brian Jonestown Massacre have revealed a new track, ‘Fact 67’ featuring Tim Burgess, along with new album ‘Don’t Get Lost’, which will be released on February 24th – just four months after the release of their last album ‘Third World Pyramid’.

Brian Jonestown Massacre premiere “Fact 67” the lead single from their forthcoming new album, “Don’t Get Lost”.

Featuring legendary Mancunian Tim Burgess, Fact 67 is the first single to be taken from the forthcoming album Don’t Get Lost, and sees The Charlatans frontman drape his iconic vocal over propulsive, hypnotic instrumentation.  The double LP – the 16th full-length release from BJM – will be available on 180grm yellow vinyl and was recorded and produced at Anton Newcombe’s new Cobra Studio in Berlin. Also joining the band on this album are Emil Nikolaisen from the Norwegian band Serena-Maneesh & Pete Fraser (The Pogues, New Young Pony Club) on saxophone; plus guest vocal performances from Tim Burgess (‘Fact 67’), Tess Parks (‘Groove Is In The Heart’, ‘Throbbing Gristle’, ‘Dropping Bombs On The Sun’), Shaun Rivers (‘One Slow Breath’) and Friederike Bienert (‘Ich Bin Klang’).

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Couple With Records

STONE ROSES –  All For One 

The Stone Roses are joining in this release tomfoolery with a brand new single,
The band left the brief announcement on their facebook page and no other details are forthcoming at this point in time. one can only presume that your local record emporium won’t be working overtime with physical product ready at ’20 hundred hours’ – rather this will, at least initially, be a digital release. Hell, maybe they’ll just bung something up on YouTube or Soundcloud – who knows! Labels and artists do play fast and loose with the phrase “releasing a single” these days

The Mancunians have a number of shows planned for this year including four nights at Manchester’s Etihad Stadium with a slightly more rock ‘n’ roll pedigree, Madison Square Garden at the end of next month. The Stone Roses’ last single was Begging You from late 1995 which peaked at number 15 in the UK (although a four-track live EP, Crimson Tonight, was issued in Japan and Australia).

Image of Cate Le Bon - Crab Day

Cate Le Bon will releases her fourth album Crab Day ovia Turnstile on LP, CD. Recorded at Panoramic House studio, West Marin, California last spring, Crab Day was produced by Noah Georgson and Josiah Steinbrick.

According to Cate: “Crab Day was lovingly formed in the mouth of the Pacific Ocean, as it quietly mocked us with its magnitude. It’s the sound of the ‘accidentally on purpose’ coming together of the right people at precisely the right time in an environment that furnished and fuelled the abandonment we felt effortlessly. It’s a coalition of inescapable feelings and fabricated nonsense, each propping the other up.Crab Day is an old holiday. Crab Day is a new holiday. Crab Day isn’t a holiday at all.”

BAT FOR LASHES  –  The Bride

Bat For Lashes are back in July with their fourth album The Bride,
The ‘band’ is of course Natasha Khan and the new record sounds promising; a concept album that follows the story of a woman whose fiancé has been killed in a crash on the way to the church for their wedding. In the narrative ‘The Bride’ flees the scene to take the honeymoon trip alone, resulting in – we are told – “a dark meditation on love, loss, grief, and celebration”.

LOLA COLT  –  TWIST THROUGH THE FIRE

Lola Colt are a London 6 piece band. With roots in psych, influences in vintage film and cinematic sound and the use of unusual instrumentation such as Shahi-Baaja, Darbuka and Harmonium. There’s a depth and atmosphere in their music akin to a film noir soundtrack. Frontwoman Gun Overbye’s lyrics add another spiritual dimension, formed as standalone pieces of poetry on themes of hypnotism and heartache and merged later with the band’s enveloping soundscapes. The new album was self-recorded and produced in James Hurst’s London studio. Recreating the magic of the 6 piece live, much of the album began as spontaneous studio sessions, laying down ideas and treating the music making process initially as a fluid journey and an outpouring of creative ideas, before the borderline perfectionist band spent a year re-working the songs into the fully formed album you hear today.

BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE -BOUT DES DOIGTS

Recorded in March 2016 in Anton Newcombe’s studio in Berlin, Anton gathered Dan Alliare (drums), Colliin Hegna (bass), Joel Gion (tambourine), Ricky Maymi (guitar) and Ryan Van Kriedt (guitar) to record this track ‘Bout Des Doigts’ and ‘Fingertips’. ‘Bout Des Doigts’ features Rike (Friedrike) Bienert providing the vocals, ‘Fingertips’ vocals are provided by Tess Parks.

GOGGS -GOGGS

Chapter Two: We find our man stumbling through the darkness in the garden of illusion and fame. Chris Shaw smokes the microphone while Ty Segall and Charles Moothart trade lizardian licks and skin hits. Guest Goggs include Cory Hanson, Mikal Cronin and Denee Petracek. Ten tracks of misanthropic noise to bring home to mom’s house on fire. Boots to your face after the high speed chase, Then! A death trip down memory lane. The lead actor dies first and the shotgun shooter flashes chipped teeth. Created in Los Angeles in the middle of the summer of 2015: three years of planning, thirty days of writing, one week of ripping. A severed finger on the button, the player ends the game. Final notice has been served.
LP – With Download.

PINEGROVE  – CARDINAL

After a number of different releases and years of touring, Montclair, New Jersey’s Pinegrove have offered their finest work to date with their newest LP, ‘Cardinal’. The band’s captivating blend of indie rock, pop and country elements is more vivid, fine-tuned, and addictive than ever before. Vocalist / guitarist Evan Stephens Hall along with brothers Zack Levine (drums) and Nick Levine (guitar) form a core that has been playing together since early childhood. Painting his emotions onto these songs with colourful and kinetic strokes, Hall moves through Cardinal’s eight songs with unforgettable energy and passion, with a vocal performance that is pleasantly reminiscent of Will Oldham and Built to Spill’s Doug Martsch. Highlighted by the downtrodden nostalgia of twangy opener ‘Old Friends’ and the climactic refrain of ‘Size of the Moon,’ where the confession “I don’t know what I’m afraid of,” is just as much of a sing-a-long as it is an emotional breakdown, moods don’t stay in one place for very long on Cardinal – they are carefully crafted and revisited throughout to continually evoke the album’s central themes of memory, language, and home.
2CD – Double CD Version with a bonus 5 track CD and signed by Evan.
LP – With Bonus 5 Track CD and signed by Evan.
Tape – No extras.

CROWS  –  UNWELCOME LIGHT

Recalling the rhythm of Brian Jones Town Massacre, the unrelenting drive of Savages and the vocal warble of The Cramps, Crows debut EP, ‘Unwelcome Light’, sees the band at their most frenetic and offers an insight into the intensity and darkness the band produce.

CHELSEA WOLFE – UNKNOWN ROOMS: A COLLECTION OF ACOUSTIC SONGS

Northern California native Chelsea Wolfe’s sound is best described with broad strokes: elemental, intense, radiant, ancient yet modern, intimate yet expansive, dark and sparkling. Hues of black metal and deep blues inform her ever-evolving electric folk — a warm force that wraps itself around the listener, encouraging uplift, seeking triumph. Her voice similarly haunts and soothes, with words that illuminate life’s darker corners in order to reveal the unlikely truth and beauty hidden within. In a way, Wolfe is on a journey to the surface of her own music. 2012 finds releasing her first acoustic emanation on Sargent House, titled Unknown Rooms: A Collection of Acoustic Songs.The experience is a secret shared, a side of our heroine rarely seen or heard, and the making was as intimate as it gets: recorded in the woods of Northern California and at Wolfe’s L.A. home, co-produced by her bandmate Ben Chisholm, with players Ezra Buchla of Gowns (viola), Andrea Calderón of Corima (violin) and Daniel Denton of Gothic Tropic (bass).

Image of PJ Harvey - The Hope Six Demolition Project

This spring sees the release of PJ Harvey’s ninth studio album, The Hope Six Demolition Project.

The Hope Six Demolition Project draws from several journeys undertaken by Harvey, who spent time in Kosovo, Afghanistan and Washington, D.C. over a four-year period. “When I’m writing a song I visualise the entire scene. I can see the colours, I can tell the time of day, I can sense the mood, I can see the light changing, the shadows moving, everything in that picture. Gathering information from secondary sources felt too far removed for what I was trying to write about. I wanted to smell the air, feel the soil and meet the people of the countries I was fascinated with”, says Harvey.

The album was recorded last year in residency at London’s Somerset House. The exhibition, entitled ‘Recording in Progress’ saw Harvey, her band, producers Flood and John Parish, and engineers working within a purpose-built recording studio behind one-way glass, observed throughout by public audiences.

The second album from Minneapolis-based band Night Moves, ‘Pennied Days’ on Domino. Written and recorded by principle band members John Pelant and Micky Alfano, and produced by John Angello (Kurt Vile, Sonic Youth, The Walkmen), the album feels warm with feeling, tinged with a deep appreciation for rock and roll’s most storied songwriters. Ranging from traditionalist heroes like Leon Russell and The Band to r’n’b originators Curtis Mayfield and Sly Stone to pre-punk experimentalists Suicide. It’s distinctly modern and a great leap forward from 2012’s Colored Emotions. ‘Pennied Days’ was recorded following tours with Father John Misty, Lord Huron, Django Django, and Polica, in support of the previous album.
LP – Heavyweight LP with Download.
LP+ – Deluxe Heavyweight LP with a limited edition 10 inch with three bonus tracks and Download.

When The Coathangers started up in 2006, their aspirations were humble. “I think all bands in their early twenties start for fun,” says guitarist / vocalist Julia Kugel when talking about their early years of cheeky no-wave and irreverent garage rock. But Julia and her bandmates Meredith Franco (bass / vocals) and Stephanie Luke (drums / vocals) were serious about their craft, and that combination of modest outside expectations and absolute dedication to their music made for exhilarating live shows and contagious records. Ten years later, The Coathangers are still going strong, and while their palette has expanded over the years to touch upon hip-shakin’ classic rock, soulful country ballads, and golden oldies pop, their primary attack strategy still relies heavily on the jagged hooks and boisterous choruses of their formative years. Their fifth album ‘Nosebleed Weekend’ retains all the devil-may-care magnetism and serrated instrumentation of their debut, but it flourishes with a decade’s worth of songwriting discipline and chemistry. ‘Nosebleed Weekend’ kicks off with ‘Perfume’, a song that marries sultry pop vocals with toothy guitar riffs in a manner that would make Ann and Nancy Wilson proud. It’s hard to imagine The Coathangers writing a song this accessible in their early years, but in 2016 it fits perfectly into their canon. From there the band launches into ‘Dumb Baby’, which harkens back to the gritty neo-garage rock of Murder City Devils. Longtime fans who still clamor for their brash post-punk angle will be immediately satiated by ‘Squeeki Tiki’. And after hearing the noisy loud-quiet-loud bombast of ‘Excuse Me?’ it’s no wonder that Kim Gordon has become an outspoken fan of the band. It’s an eclectic album inspired by life on the road, lost loved ones, and Kugel’s recent move to Southern California. “We always say that each record is a snapshot of our life at the time,” Kugel says. “As far as style… it’s just what came out of us at that point.” So whether it’s the foreboding garage rock of the title track, the post-punk groove of ‘Burn Me’, the stripped-down pop of ‘I Don’t Think So’, or the dynamic grunge of ‘Down Down’, The Coathangers command their songs with passion and authority.
LP – Housed in Gatefold Sleeve with Download. Initial copies are pressed on coloured vinyl.

Image of Suuns - Hold/Still

Hold/Still, the third studio album from Suuns, is an enigmatic thing: an eerily beautiful, meticulously played suite of music that embraces opposites and makes a virtue of cognitive dissonance. It is a record that does not give up its secrets easily. The 11 songs within are simultaneously psychedelic, but austere; sensual, but cold; organic, but electronic; tense sometimes to the brink of mania, but always retaining perfect poise and control. “There’s an element of this album that resists you as a listener, and I think that’s because of these constantly opposing forces,” says drummer Liam O’Neill. “Listen to the song ‘Brainwash’, for instance, “It’s a very soft, lyrical guitar song, existing alongside extremely aggressive and sparse drum textures. It inhabits these two worlds at the same time.”

From the beginning, Suuns (you pronounce it “soons”, and it translates as “zeroes” in Thai) have sought to do things differently. They formed in Montreal 2007, when singer/guitarist Ben Shemie and guitarist Joe Yarmush got together to work on some demos, soon to be joined by Liam, Ben’s old schoolfriend, on drums and Max Henry on synth. Their group’s first two records, 2010’s Zeroes QC and 2012’s Polaris Prize-nominated Images Du Futur – both released on Secretly Canadian – were immediate critical hits, and Suuns soon found themselves part of a late ’00s musical renaissance in the city, alongside fellow groups like The Besnard Lakes, Islands and Land Of Talk. Still, at the same time, Suuns feel remote from the big, baroque ensembles and apocalyptic orchestras that typify the Montreal scene. “We write quite minimal music,” thinks Ben. “They’re not traditional song forms, sometimes they don’t really go anywhere – but they have their own kind of logic.” Or as Joe puts it: “It’s pop music, but sitting in this evil space.”

After two records produced by their friend Jace Lasek of The Besnard Lakes at his Montreal studio Breakglass, Suuns decided Hold/Still demanded a different approach. In May 2015, they decamped to Dallas, Texas to work with Grammy- winning producer John Congleton (St Vincent, The War On Drugs, Sleater- Kinney). For three intense weeks, the four recorded in Congleton’s studio by day, the producer driving them to capture perfect live takes with virtually no overdubbing. At night, they returned to their cramped apartment and stewed. “Recording in Montreal, it’s more of a party atmosphere,” says Joe. “Here it felt like we were on a mission. We were looking for something to take us out of our element, or that might seep into our music.” Luckily, the effect was galvanizing. Under Congleton’s instruction, ‘Translate’ and ‘Infinity’, songs the group had been reworking for years, suddenly found their form.

The result is undoubtedly Suuns’ most focused album to date, the sound of a band working in mental lockstep, crafting a guitar music that feels unbeholden to clear traditions or genre brackets. From the haunted electronic blues of ‘Nobody Can Save Me Now’ to throbbing seven-minute centrepiece ‘Careful’, Hold/Still foregrounds the work of Max, a synthesizer obsessive who builds hisown patches and confesses to using cranky or budget equipment as well as top-of-the-range kit because “[good gear] does all the work for you, and that’s not always fun”. Certainly, this is a band as inspired by the dark groove textures of Andy Stott, the flourishing arpeggios of James Holden or the serrated productions of Death Grips as anything familiarly rock. “Things don’t feel right until they’ve been touched or cast over in an electronic light,” elaborates Liam. “It’s rare that acoustic drum kit, guitar, and bass comprise a finished product for us. For a song to be Suuns, it has to be coloured by electronics”.

Certainly this remains a band in love with the aesthetic of obscurity. The album cover is an image of Ben’s former workmate Nahka, who was captured by photographer Caroline Desilets using a pinhole camera with a four-minute exposure time – Hold/Still, indeed.

In another contradiction, this record finds Ben’s vocals far more enunciated and upfront than before. If there are themes that tie Hold/Still together, says Ben, they might be investigations “about sex… perhaps not the act specifically, just [themes] of a sexual nature. But there’s also a spiritual undertone that points to another kind of searching.” The sexual is illustrated in the dark romance of ‘Careful’, while longing becomes both sexual and spiritual in the thirsty pleas of ‘Instrument’: “I wanna believe/I wanna receive…” The spiritual takes over on the back half of the record. ‘Nobody Can Save Me Now’ evokes artist Tracey Emin’s ghostly invocation For You at the Liverpool Cathedral: “I felt you / and I knew that you loved me”, while side B opener ‘Brainwash’ wonders: “Do you see, all seeing? / Do you know, all knowing?”

In a cultural centre like Montreal, bands can get too comfortable playing to their peers. Suuns, though, feel like a band always looking to the nearest border. They found early audiences in France and in Belgium, where they curated the Sonic City Festival in 2012, booking acts as diverse as Swans, Tim Hecker and Demdike Stare. Meanwhile, the last couple of years have seen them tour as far afield as Mexico, Morocco, Beirut, Taiwan and Istanbul – sometimes with friend Radwan Moumneh of the multimedia project Jerusalem In My Heart, with whom they released a brilliant collaborative record, Suuns And Jerusalem In My Heart last year.

“We tour a lot as a band and we’ve been all over the map at this point,” says Ben. “There is a concerted effort on our part, when the opportunity arises, to do that. It’s like, this time, let’s try to go further east, let’s try to go further south. You find yourself playing in front of people who don’t get bands playing in front of them often, and that can be really fun.” In short, good things happen when you venture outside of your comfort zone – a truth that you could equally apply to Hold/Still itself: an album which derives its eerie power from simmering tensions and strange, stark juxtapositions, and in doing so, directs rock music down a new, unventured path.

This is a single disc version on 180grm Green vinyl. The ORIGINAL VERSION of this vinyl of this brand new EP was work of art collaboration between Anton Newcombe & Icelandic artist Jon Semundur Auoarson the double 12″ EP consists of 5 new tracks by the Brian Jonestown Massacre & double sided etched disc by Jon Semundur Auoarson & was strictly limited to 1,000 Units worldwide This VERSION is a single 5 track EP but with the same superb cover art as the original release . This was recorded after the extensive tour of Europe ,Australia , New Zealand & a few select dates in New York State (especially ATP supporting My Bloody Valentine et al ) in 2008 , Anton went to Berlin to focus on his next album ., 4 weeks before hitting the US tour in April 2009 ,Anton was bursting with ideas & went to Iceland where this 5 track EP was recorded . This album brings the traditional Brian Jonestown Massacre sound mixed with eastern influences & bringing it up to date with the benefit of all the additional weirdness that’s been discovered in the past 40 years.

Image of Kevin Morby - Singing Saw

Singing Saw is a record written simply and realized orchestrally. In it, Kevin Morby faces the reality that true beauty – deep and earned – demands a whole-world balance that includes our darker sides. It is a record of duality, one that marks another stage of growth for this young, gifted songwriter with a kind face and a complicated mind.

In the Autumn of 2014, Kevin Morby moved to the small Los Angeles neighborhood of Mount Washington. The move would shape Singing Saw, Morby’s first album for new label Dead Oceans. Previous tenants at Morby’s new home happened to leave an upright piano behind, with a few mysterious pieces of sheet music and an introductory book of common chords stacked on top. Thankful to finally be in one place for an extended spell, Morby, a beginner at the piano, immediately sat at the new instrument and began composing the songs that would form Singing Saw.

Alongside, he began taking long walks through the winding hills and side streets of the neighborhood each night, glimpsing views of both the skyline’s sweeping lights and the dark, dried out underbrush of the LA flora. The duality of the city itself began to shape a set of lyrical ideas that he would refine with the sparse accompaniment of piano and acoustic guitar.

What is a singing saw? It is an instrument that creates ethereal sounds, but it is also a tool: basic and practical while also being fearsome, even destructive. Morby watches the singing saw in its eponymous song; that instrument of eerie soft beauty cuts down the flowers in its path and chases after him, while his surroundings mock and dwarf him, Alice in Wonderland style. And in a singing saw, we can understand music as something more powerful than its inviting, delicate sound. No wonder Morby talks about a “songbook” in his head as something he needs to take up the hills so he can “get rid of it.” Heavy themes are nothing new for Morby, whose previous records (2013’s Harlem River and 2014’s Still Life, both released on the Woodsist label) dealt with their own eerie visions and damning prophecies.

Morby opens Singing Saw with “Cut Me Down”, a song of tears, debts and a prescient vision of being reduced to nothing. “I Have Been to the Mountain”, “Destroyer” and “Black Flowers” continue to explore beauty and freedom, seizing upon the rot that seeps into even the supposedly safest of realms; peace, family and romantic love. By the end of the record on “Water”, Morby is literally begging to be put out once and for all, like a fire that might burn all the visions away.

Travels beyond his mountain walks inform songs like “Dorothy”, which recounts a trip to Portugal, witnessing a fishing ritual and luxuriating in the aura of a bar light-tinged reunion with old friends The touching innocence of “Ferris Wheel” stands alone in stark simplicity amidst the lush sonic textures of the album. Here, the album is balanced by Morby’s signature sweetness and joie de vivre.

The arrangements of Singing Saw trace back to Morby’s experience playing in The Complete Last Waltz, a live recreation of The Band’s legendary last performance. There, Morby developed a fast friendship with producer/bandleader Sam Cohen (Apollo Sunshine, Yellow Birds), which led Morby to forgo recording in Los Angeles and take the nascent songs of Singing Saw to Isokon Studios in Woodstock, New York. There, in a converted A-frame house, they set about creating a record that would bring a sonic balance, intricacy and depth to match these songs and all that inspired them.

Sam Cohen added a multitude of instrumentation to the record (guitar, bass, drums and keyboard), and were joined by fellow Complete Last Waltz alum Marco Benevento on piano and keyboard, fleshing out Morby’s original compositions and upholding the vision for a cohesive piano sound that serves as a touchstone for the entire album. Backup vocalists Hannah Cohen, Lauren Balthrop and Alecia Chakor contribute soaring harmonies; Nick Kinsey (Elvis Perkins) adds drums and percussion; Justin Sullivan, a longtime Morby collaborator and staple of his live band, contributes drums; Oliver Hill and Eliza Bag lift numerous songs with string accompaniments, and Alec Spiegelman on saxophone and flute and Cole Kamen-Green on trumpet bring dramatic swells. Finally, John Andrews (Quilt) adds the eerie lilt of the album’s promise, providing saw on the “Cut Me Down” and “Singing Saw”.

In the end, Morby fulfills the promise many heard on his first two albums, bringing his most realized effort of songwriting and lyricism to fruition. The songs of Singing Saw reflect the clarity that comes from welcoming change and embracing duality, and the distillation of those elements into an entirely new vision.

After the critically acclaimed release ‘Deep Fantasy’ (2014), White Lung return with their fourth album ‘Paradise’. Vocalist Mish Barber-Way, guitarist Kenneth William and drummer Anne-Marie Vassiliou, reconnected in Los Angeles to work with engineer and producer Lars Stalfors (Health, Cold War Kids, Alice Glass). Mixed by Stalfors and later mastered by Joe LaPorta, ‘Paradise’ is their smartest, brightest songwriting yet. Coming in at 28 minutes, the album simmers with desire and pain, love and beauty, and a seething urgency, hurtling towards the album closer and title track Paradise at signature breakneck speed.
LP+ – Pressed on pale blue vinyl limited quantity worldwide includes printed inner sleeve and MP3 download card.
Tape – Limited edition cassette version of the album in a silver / blue / red tri-glitter shell, limited to 300 worldwide, includes MP3 download card.
CD – Digipack.
LP – Black Vinyl with printed inner sleeve and MP3 download card.

Image of Sam Beam & Jesca Hoop - Love Letter For Fire

Love Letter for Fire is a collaboration between Sam Beam (aka Iron and Wine) and singer-songwriter Jesca Hoop. The thirteen-track album features the singles “Every Songbird Says” and “Valley Clouds,” and was written throughout 2014. Love Letter for Fire features Beam and Hoop on vocals and guitar along with Robert Burger (keys), Eyvind Kang (violin, viola), Glenn Kotche (drums, percussion), Sebastian Steinberg (bass) and Edward Rankin-Parker (cello). The album also features a cover photo by Sam Beam.

As Iron and Wine, Sam Beam recorded for Sub Pop from 2002-2007, releasing a number of highly-acclaimed albums, singles, and EP’s, including The Creek Drank The Cradle (2002), Our Endless Numbered Days (2004), Woman King (2005) and The Shepherd’s Dog (2007). He went on to record for Warner Brothers, Nonesuch, and 4AD. Recent releases include a covers album with Ben Bridwell from Band of Horses, and the two-volume Archive Series, which features material that preceded Sam’s Sub Pop-era recordings.

Jesca Hoop is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. She is an incredible live performer, known for her wonderfully-eclectic take on folk, rock, and electronic music. Hoop has released five albums and two EPs, including the critic favorites Hunting My Dress and The House That Jack Built. Jesca has toured and collaborated with the likes of Shearwater, Willy Mason, Blake Mills, Andrew Bird, The Ditty Bops, Guy Garvey, and Elbow, and has recorded for Bella Union and Vanguard. Love Letter for Fire was produced, recorded and mixed by Tucker Martine (Modest Mouse, Decemberists, Neko Case) at Flora Recording & Playback in Portland, OR and mastered by Richard Dodd in Nashville, TN.

Late last year, Destroyer released ‘Poison Season’ – a treasure trove of mid-’70s Bowie-esque thumpers, string-laden laments and E Street horns – to universal acclaim. Recorded in the same sessions as ‘Poison Season’, the song ‘My Mystery’ was a huge favourite yet somehow felt like it didn’t quite fit on the album. Now it gets released as a stand alone 12″ backed by ‘My Mystery (DJ johnedwardcollins@gmail.com remix)’.

Tanya Donelly is a singer-songwriter and founding member of three of the most successful bands of the post-punk era. At the age of 16, she and stepsister Kristin Hersh formed Throwing Muses, which became the first American band ever signed to the influential British label 4AD. Not only did the Muses’ dreamy, swirling guitar sound prove highly influential on many of the alternative acts to emerge in their wake, but they also made any number of unprecedented advances into the male-dominated world of underground rock. Donelly later sidelined with Pixies bassist Kim Deal to form the Breeders, appearing on the debut LP, Pod. She later exited both the Breeders and Throwing Muses to form her own band, Belly. After issuing a pair of well-received EPs, Belly released their full-length debut, Star — a superb collection of luminous, fairy tale-like guitar pop songs — and for the first time in her career, Donelly earned commercial success commensurate to her usual critical accolades. Not only did the record go gold on the strength of the hit single ‘Feed the Tree’ but the band even garnered a Grammy nomination for Best New Artist. Donelly would eventually disband Belly to raise her two daughters. She still found time to write and record music as a solo artist — Beautysleep, Whiskey Tango Ghosts and This Hungry Life were all exceptional albums and enjoyed critical success. The Swan Song Series is a collection of songs in which Donelly collaborated with friends, musicians and authors such as Rick Moody, Robyn Hitchcock, John Wesley Harding, Damon Krukowski and Naomi Yang (Damon + Naomi/Galaxie 500), Bill Janovitz (Buffalo Tom), Tom Gorman (Belly), and Claudia Gonson (Magnetic Fields), and explored an impressive range that wasn’t always captured on previous albums. This exclusive collection includes the first 5 self-released digital EP’s + 7 brand new, previously unreleased, tracks on a 31 song set.

Image of Lush - Blind Spot EP

The first new music from Lush for 20 years, and the first the band have released since their single 500 (Shake Baby Shake), taken from their last album Lovelife, in July 1996.

The four tracks were recorded in the summer of 2015 with Daniel Hunt (Ladytron) and Jim Abbiss (Adele, Kasabian, Arctic Monkeys)

Talking about the recording of the EP, Miki Berenyi commented:
“It certainly took sometime to come together, but once we were in the studio, everything came together incredibly quickly. It was great fun!
It’s been a long time since I’ve written Lush lyrics, and I realised early on with this EP that what I wrote about then is not what I feel comfortable writing about now. My perspective, and what is close to my heart, has changed, and I think that’s conveyed in the songs.”

Bassist Phil King added:”I know I’m biased, but I work for a music magazine and so much of the music I hear played in the office sounds non-descript or derivative. Emma has this way of writing unusual chord changes and manages to weave lovely melodies over the top, and it immediately sounds distinctive, like Lush.”

Signed to 4AD in 1989, over the course of 3 full-length albums, an early mini-album and a number of EPs and singles, they went on to sharpen their pop sound, outliving and outgrowing the ‘scene’ with which they were initially associated.

4AD recently released, to much acclaim, both a vinyl reissue of Lush’s ‘best of’ compilation Ciao! and a limited edition five-disc box set titled Chorus.

Serving up a combination of Southern musicality and garage rock ferocity, Shreveport, Louisiana natives Seratones announce their debut album ‘Get Gone,’ released via Fat Possum Records. Led by powerhouse frontwoman A.J. Haynes whose thunderous vocals recall the grit of Janis Joplin and gospel of Mavis Staples, Seratones make a strong case with ‘Get Gone’ to be your new favourite alt-rock band of 2016. Recorded at Dial Back Sound studios in Mississippi, ‘Get Gone’ is all live takes, a portrait of Seratones in their element. Add the soul and swagger of a juke joint with the electricity coursing through a basement DIY show, and you’d begin to approach the experience of seeing this foursome live. Haynes’ powerful singing voice, first honed at Brownsville Baptist Church in Columbia, Louisiana at age 6, rings across every track. ‘Don’t Need It,’ which opens with a muscular swing and tight guitar lines, builds into a monster finish with a nasty corkscrew of a guitar line. ‘Sun,’ a brawny thrasher, courses with huge, raw voltage riffs. ‘Chandelier,’ a mid-tempo burner and vocal workout by Haynes, goes from croon to a crescendo that would shake any crystals hanging from the rafters. Shared history in Shreveport’s music scene brought the Seratones together a few years ago. All four had played together with one or another in various local punk bands, bonding through all-ages basement shows, gigs at skate parks and BBQ joints, and late nights listening to jazz and blues records. In a city of multiple genres, no fixed musical identity and a flood of cover bands, these adventurous musicians carved out their own path, personifying the do-it-yourself ethos. The band’s unwavering dedication to staying true to themselves is echoed throughout their debut; however you try to describe it, ‘Get Gone’ is unexpected and unbowed, a head-snapping showcase of the twin pillars of Southern music, restlessness and resourcefulness.
LP – Black Vinyl With Download.
LP+ – Limited Yellow Coloured Vinyl with Download.

Limited 7″ (200 copies) with CD (CD contains Stereo, Mono & Instrumental mixes), and digital download. We have 50 copies only !!! Alt pop super-group FIR combines the songwriting genius of Brent Rademaker from Beachwood Sparks and Matt Piucci from Rain Parade, with the extraordinary talents of Rob Campanella from The Brian Jonestown Massacre and Nelson Bragg from the Brian Wilson Band. On this record, the bittersweet combo is made complete by the smooth harmony vocals of the Allah-Las. Sounding something like a sugary, drugged out Beatles, FIR’s first 7″

 

The Brian Jonestown Massacre was formed in San Francisco in 1990. The band has had over 40 members since then, but its driving force and main songwriter is Anton Newcombe. Other prominent members have included Matt Hollywood, Dean Taylor, Jeff Davies, Brian Glaze, and Joel Gion. Their sound is heavily influenced by the sounds of the 1960s, but also carries influences from , , , and genres.