Posts Tagged ‘Something Else’

Something Else by The Kinks

‘The Village Green Preservation Society‘ may the one that gets all the plaudits, but ‘Something Else’ can lay claim to being just as good in it’s own way, featuring some of the best of Ray Davies’ songwriting, which of course means it’s up there with the some of the best song writing ever.

Apart from “End of the Season”, the album was recorded between the autumn of 1966 and the summer of 1967, when the Kinks had cut back on touring and had begun recording and stockpiling songs for Davies’s as-yet poorly defined “Village Green” project. The song “Village Green” was recorded in November 1966 during the sessions for the album, but was released on a French EP in 1967 and did not appear on a Kinks LP until the next release, The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society.

Opening with public school satire ‘David Watts’ (later made famous by The Jam), ‘Something Else’ is a bit of a dry run for ‘Village Green‘, lacking the overarching concept, but still rating high on essential Englishness and also delving into such standard Davies topics as identikit suburbia (‘Tin Soldier’), idle affluence (‘End of the Season) and sibling rivalry (‘Two Sisters’, apparently a coded comment on the band’s brother problems). What does it sound like? Well, it sounds like The Kinks, that is to say that there’s plenty of sprightly sixties RnB based guitar pop, a bit of copycat psychedelia (Davies was never one to overlook to convenience of hijacking bandwagons), some Cockney knees-up pleasantries (Dave Davies’ ‘Death of a Clown’) and enough good humour and essential pathos for most bands to base their entire careers on.

‘Afternoon Tea’, with it’s understated, very British sense of romance and charming, Davies brothers vocal interplay, would be quite enough to carry the LP on it’s own, but alongside the infectious ‘Harry Rag’, ‘David Watts’, ‘Lazy Old Sun’ and the rest, ‘Something Else’ is easily capable of unveiling masterpieces one after another. There is a little filler – Dave Davies’ other compositions don’t quite come up to the mark and ‘Situations Vacant’ is distinctly Kinks by numbers, but all in all this is an essential album by a band too often dismissed as a ‘singles act’. Oh, and it’s got ‘Waterloo Sunset’ on it – what else could you possibly want from a Kinks album?

A classic from the archives, “Something Else” is the fifth studio album by The Kinks and gets a loving reissue on Sanctuary Records. On 140g vinyl with the original UK track-listing, it’s the last Kinks album to be produced by Shel Talmy and showcases one part of a mid-career high that’s still an influence today. Out on vinyl LP from Sanctuary Records.

Originally Released 15th September 1967

The Move was probably the biggest British group of the late 60s/early 70s who utterly failed to make any sort of impression on the American market. Nearly every biography written about them begins that way as if it’s the most important thing about the Move. It’s not, although it does provide a bit of (perhaps necessary) context. In England the Move had nine top 20 hits and was arguably ranked just below the Who (and just above the Pretty Things) in terms of pop group popularity. In the US however the Move never really made a dent in the charts, and are recalledif they are recalled much at all more as the predecessor to the Electric Light Orchestra, or merely a footnote in that band’s story, than for their own merits. It’s rare to find a Move album when you are crate digging.

It’s true, in America still to this day the Move would be considered downright obscure, but on (very, very rare) occasion (as in almost never), one does meet a total Roy Wood fanatic.

 

The Move‘s original five-piece line-up formed in 1965 when teenaged guitarist Roy Wood (the band’s principle songwriter), drummer Bev Bevan, bassist Ace Kefford, vocalist Carl Wayne (older than the rest of them) and guitarist Trevor Burton “moved” from the ranks of several other semi-successful Birmingham-based bands to play together in a new Brummie “supergroup.” Like a heavier Hollies, four of the quintet were capable of handling vocals and although golden-throated Carl Wayne tended to take the lead, they also switched off that everyone got a turn in the spotlight. They were managed, first by Moody Blues manager Tony Secunda—who dressed the Move in Mod gangster suits, hired strippers for their stage act and got the band a residency at the Marquee club in London—and then later by a proper gangster, the notorious Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne, the former manager of Small Faces.

The original “Something Else” was a live EP, intended to catch the Move’s considerable live prowess on one of those heady Marquee nights of 1967. But it didn’t quote work out the way it was intended. “Live” would have to be in inverted commas here because when the record finally saw release, because of problems in the recording process with the vocals, it would have to be heavily doctored in the studio. The sleeve-notes here make it clear that two live dates were recorded for the EP and in between they managed to lose bass player Ace Kefford, with Trevor Burton switching over to guitar for the second session to cover.

The first part presented here are 12 tracks from these two gigs that were remastered in stereo about ten years ago and though obviously more studio creations than bona fide live recordings they certainly hit the spot. Bev Bevan’s drumming is so powerful throughout, whilst the flash bombs went off and singer Carl Wayne axed in TV sets the mighty back-beat he supplied went on no matter what. It is inevitable given the problems with the original recording that the live chatter appears a little incongruous sound-wise with the cleanness of the music on offer. But if you can suspend disbelief and imagine that this was all laid down on tape at the same time, what you have is a choice offering of the Move in their element playing a lot of spirited covers interspersed with two of the big hits (“Flowers In The Rain” and “Fire Brigade”) and this provides a decent facsimile of what their live show would have been like at the time (sonically at least). Their version of Eddie Cochran’s “Something Else” could have even been the template for Sid’s later effort, such is the spirit of abandon.

MOVE-Something-Else_web

During one of their Marquee dates the group caused a fire after they’d smashed some television sets onstage with an ax. Three fire engines showed up to fight the blaze, inspiring front page headlines and the subject matter for a future hit single. Then Secunda, without consulting with the group, devised a controversial marketing campaign for the “Flowers in the Rain” single—the first record to be played on BBC Radio 1 and their third consecutive top five hit of 1967—consisting of a postcard depicting Prime Minister Harold Wilson in bed with his secretary. Wilson brought litigation against the Move for Secunda’s actions, which he won costing them—specifically Roy Wood who wrote the number and had nothing to do with the publicity stunt—their royalties for the hit, which were donated to charity. This led to Secunda’s firing and Arden’s hiring. In fall of 1967, the group took part in a two-week-long concert package tour around the UK, playing twice a night with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Pink Floyd and the Nice.

 

One major reason the Move never broke the American market is that they never toured here. They tried to—opening two shows for the Stooges before things fell apart—but it was a demoralizing disaster. Another reason might be their overt “Englishness” which would have been a turn off to many American rock fans at the time.

And don’t try to tell me that KISS didn’t base their entire sound on the stomp-all-over-yer-face “Brontosaurus,” because they so obviously did. (And just where do you think Paul Stanley got his “starchild” look from?,

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BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE  are set to release the first of two expected new albums in 2018
‘Something Else’ Is out on  Out On 1st June 2018, On his own imprint A Recordings.

Hear first single ‘Hold That Thought’

Brian Jonestown Massacre will release the first of 2 new albums in 2018; ‘Something Else’ is out on 1st June on A Recordings. The album, which is available on 180grm white vinyl, was recorded and produced at Anton Newcombe’s Cobra Studio in Berlin. The second album of 2018 is self-titled and will be out in September, more details to come on that at a later date…

‘Something Else’ is the Brian Jonestown Massacre’s 17th full-length release, the style of which is less experimental than more recent records and harks back to the traditional sound of the band. Recorded between 2017 and 2018, this 9-track album will please old and new fans alike.

Following a relatively quiet 2017 – the band did a tour of the US East & West Coasts and Mexico City to support last year’s album ‘Don’t Get Lost’ – the band have now announced tours of the USA, Canada and Australasia, and will shortly be announcing a tour throughout the UK and Europe.

Anton Newcombe has been a very busy man these past 4 years, having released 3 critically acclaimed Brian Jonestown Massacre albums and an EP, 1 soundtrack album and 1 album with Tess Parks, the follow up to which will be released in between the forthcoming BJM albums this year. All releases were fully recorded and produced at Anton’s studio.

The Brian Jonestown Massacre track ‘Straight Up and Down’ was used as the theme tune to the multi-award winning Boardwalk Empire. Anton penned the soundtrack for ‘Moon Dogs’, a film directed by multi-BAFTA nominated Philip John (Svengali, Downton Abbey, Being Human).

Track Listing
1. Hold That Thought
2. Animal Wisdom
3. Psychic Lips
4. Skin and Bones
5. My Poor Heart
6. My Love
7. Who dreams of cats?
8. Fragmentation
9. Silent Stream

‘a reaffirmation of their cult status.’  – Guardian
‘’Twenty years of enthusiastic participation in the rock’n’roll lifestyle may have cemented Anton Newcombe’s legend, but sobriety – he’s been clean for five years – clearly suits him.’ – Q Magazine
‘BJM delicately balance classic 60’s songwriting and woozy shoegaze…. they still inhabit a different, more enticing cosmos to their peers.’ – Mojo
Anton Newcombe is one of those rare artists who manages to stay prolific without compromising his output.’ – NME
‘astonishingly relevant in psych-obsessed 2014’ – Time Out
‘As notorious as he is prolific, Anton Newcombe has been creating shoegaze-inflected psychedelic jams for the best part of 25 years.’ – Record Collector
‘Anton Newcombe’s garage psych troupe excel on 14th LP’ – Guitarist
‘BJM are a fucking great band.’ – CRACK
‘Long Live Anton Newcombe, we still and will always adore you.’ – 1883

Click to view larger image

This is the new single which announces the band’s forthcoming two albums to be released this year. Are you ready for not one but two Brian Jonestown Massacre albums this year? Well get in the swing by buying this 10″ which contains a taster track.

The first track is “Hold That Thought” which comes from the album “Something Else” which is to be released on 1st June 2018.
The second track is “Drained” which will come from the self titled album that will be released in September of 2018.  Both tracks were recorded in Berlin & the band are announcing tours of the USA, Canada, Australasia & Europe throughout the year.
All tracks were recorded at Cobra Studios , Berlin in 2017 .

Booted with “Story Of Flowers” Directed by : Azuma Makoto Illustration by : Katie Scott Animation by : James Paulley

Brian Jonestown Massacre – ” Hold that Thought “

Fifty years ago on the 5th May 1967) The Kinks, led by singer/songwriter Ray Davies who as a great observer of daily life and an eloquent storyteller – released one of their most famous songs with Waterloo Sunset.  It was released as a single in 1967, and featured on their album “Something Else By The Kinks” . The record reached number 2 on the British charts in mid 1967 (it failed to dislodge the Tremeloes  “Silence Is Golden” from the number 1 position).

Image result for the kinks waterloo sunset cover

Years later, in 2010, Ray Davies revealed this secret: “Liverpool is my favourite city, and the song was originally called ‘Liverpool Sunset’. I was inspired by Merseybeat. I’d fallen in love with Liverpool by that point. On every tour, that was the best reception. We played The Cavern, all those old places, and I couldn’t get enough of it. I had
a load of mates in bands up there, and that sound – not The Beatles but Merseybeat – that was unbelievable. It used to inspire me every time. So I wrote ‘Liverpool Sunset’. Later it got changed to ‘Waterloo Sunset’, but there’s still that play on words with Waterloo. London was home, I’d grown up there, but I like to think I could be an adopted Scouser. My heart is definitely there…”Now it’s time to dream away…