Posts Tagged ‘King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard’

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard have announced their 15th studio album (!) in the past 7 years. Infest The Rats’ Nest will be released on Flightless Records on August 16th, 2019 with pre-order for the album going live on June 25th, Infest The Rats’ Nest features the band’s two recent singles Self-Immolate and Planet B, both of which were accompanied by dark, violent John Angus Stewart-directed videos.

The new tracks are evidence that Infest the Rat’s Nest will take a distinctly different track to the band’s recently released album, Fishing For Fishies, which came out on Flightless in late April 2019. That album ended up at #1 on ARIA vinyl charts.

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard released a whopping five new albums last year. The Melbourne psych-rock outfit shared their latest LP, Fishing For Fishies, back in April, and now they’ve announced their second album of 2019. Infest The Rats’ Nest will be King Gizzard’s 15th album in the past seven years.

Infest The Rats’ Nest sees the band embracing thrash metal. The press release says it’s their “hardest and heaviest album to date. How metal is it? Very Metal. Maybe even more.” The album was recorded with three of the seven band members. Frontman Stu Mackenzie and guitarist Joey Walker share guitar and bass duty while Michael Cavanagh handles the drums.

“The A-side of the album is set in the near future and is about real shit going on right now – especially ecological disaster,” Mackenzie explains in a statement. “We’ve got a lot of things to fear. The B-side tells the story of a group of rebels who are forced to leave Planet Earth and try to settle on Venus. I spend a lot of time thinking about the future of humanity and the future of Planet Earth. Naturally these thoughts seep into the lyrics.”

Infest The Rats’ Nest is out 8/16 via Flightless/ATO.

King Gizz will embark on a massive world tour . These shows are not to be missed.

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Sit back and strap yourself in as the seven-headed Aussie rock beast King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard return with Fishing for Fishies”, perhaps their most perfectly-realised album to date. Here is a world where the organic meets the automated; where the rustic meets the robotic. Where the past and future collide in the beautiful present.

The thirteenth album since their 2012 debut – and their first following the release of five vastly different albums in 2017 – Fishing for Fishies is a blues-infused blast of sonic boogie that struts and shimmies through several moods and terrains. From the soft shuffle Outback country of the opening title track through the sunny easy listening of ‘The Bird Song’ (think the lysergically-soaked Laurel Canyon circa 1973) and on through the party funk of ‘Plastic Boogie’ (which somehow summons the spirit of Stevie Wonder’s Innervisions) the road-trucking, Doors-like highway rock of ‘The Cruel Millennial’ and ‘Real Is Real’ – what The Carpenters might have sounded like had they existed entirely on vegemite and weed – it’s a dizzying, dazzling display.

Hell, The Gizz make it look so easy.

And that’s all before we even get to ‘Acarine’, a futurist blues tune which heads off into previously unchartered territories of shimmering Eno-esque ambient and dark John Carpenter-style electro, and the electro squelch of album-closing single ‘Cyboogie’, on which five of the seven King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard members play synths. It’s a stomping vocoder-lead anthem akin to Georgio Moroder or Trans-era Neil Young and a triumphant conclusion to an album that is as surprising as it is thrilling, as unexpected as it is effortless.

“We tried to make a blues record,” says frontman Stu Mackenzie. “A blues-boogie-shuffle-kinda-thing, but the songs kept fighting it – or maybe it was us fighting them. Ultimately though we let the songs guide us this time; we let them have their own personalities and forge their own path. Paths of light, paths of darkness. This is a collection of songs that went on wild journeys of transformation.”

“I didn’t really know who I was by the end of 2017,” continues Stu, of the band’s never-to-be-repeated year, which concluded with the fifth album being released on New Years Eve 2017. “It was a good kind of spent feeling though, as I like being busy. For most of the holiday period I was in the studio doing the last of the recording and mixing on Gumboot Soup. And as soon as it clicked over to 2018 I stopped worrying about recording for a while and started living instead.”

Out of this period came Fishing for Fishies, an album in which musical motifs recur: lush piano, mellotron and synth flourishes (the bulk of the album was written on piano); Ambrose Kenny-Smith’s distinctive harmonica, which brings to mind sidewinders crossing dusty widescreen vistas; a generous dose of vocoder; and a plethora of creative U-turns that conspire to create a general overall sense of man and machine melding together in a thrilling chrome-covered hybrid.

Because Fishing for Fishies is an album looking out across the horizon through mirrored sunglasses while twenty-tonne juggernauts thunder past. Here, perhaps, is a place where the spirit of two key songs released in the same year – Ram Jam’s ‘Black Betty’ and Kraftwerk’s ‘Trans-Europe Express’ – linger somewhere in the mix. And what may sound absurd on paper is actually the genius work of a band of musicians entirely simpatico with one another after nearly a decade of constant evolution.

“We have travelled a lot – we’ve seen the world – but it all still feels like discovery,” says Stu, in trademark self-effacing style. “We’re still essentially naive kids tinkering around with toys we don’t know how to use in the studio.”

Newcomers to King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard will find an entire self-contained universe awaits them in a thrilling body of work. Here are grand concepts where albums overlap, riffs resurface, circular songs chase their own tails, grand narratives are told, cryptic lyrics endlessly analysed and a whole army of fans regurgitate the band’s output via a deluge of remixes, memes, visual loops, mind-melting cut-ups and just generally pontificate wildly about everything in The Gizzverse, much of it available on Youtube and internet forums.

“I am aware that it exists,” laughs Stu, of the alternative world that exists in their honour. “But I’m completely social media-less and pretty stone-age really. Good on ‘em for digging deep though.”

Because King Gizzard are no longer a band, they are a cult, a youth movement, an exploration, a double-drumming trip, a cottage industry centred around their own Flightless Records. Many milestones have been ticked off along the way: a headline slot at the UK’s Green Man Festival; a huge sold-out US tour; playing to five thousand people at a sold-out Brixton Academy one day…and then 100 people in the Yorkshire hill town of Hebden Bridge the next. Meanwhile their Gizzfest gathering in Melbourne is now in its fourth year. They are a band to give your life to. Perhaps more than anything they provide transportive fun, a valuable and often-overlooked commodity in an increasingly fraught world.

Best of all, anyone can step into The Gizzverse – anytime, anywhere. No prior understanding is necessary. So whether it’s psyche rock played with breakneck precision (2014’s I’m In Your Mind Fuzz), life-giving acoustic folk and Tropicalia (2015’s Paper Mâché Dream Balloon), a three-part sci-fi/prog album (2017’s Murder Of The Universeor an album uploaded on an open license so that budding labels worldwide could press their own copies, which they duly did, currently 240 different pressings according to Discogs (2017’s, Polygondwanaland), King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard provide it. As Pitchfork noted, they have waged war against two tired clichés: “One, that rock is dead; and two, that the album is dead.” More than that, they have staked their claim as one of the most innovative, exciting and productive bands of the 21st century.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard are: Stu Mackenzie (vocals/guitar/flute), Ambrose Kenny-Smith (harmonica/vocals), Cook Craig (guitar/vocals), Joey Walker (guitar), Lucas Skinner (bass), Eric Moore (drums) and Michael Cavanagh (drums).

Fishing For Fishies

The King Gizzard’s fourteenth album since their 2012 debut – and their first following the release of five vastly different albums in 2017 – “Fishing For Fishies” is a blues-infused blast of sonic boogie that struts and shimmies through several moods and terrains.

From the soft shuffle outback country of the opening title track through the sunny easy listening of ‘The Bird Song’ (think the lysergically-soaked laurel canyon circa 1973) and on through the party funk of ‘plastic boogie’ (which somehow summons the spirit of Stevie Wonder’s Innervisions) the road-trucking, doors-like highway rock of ‘The Cruel Millennial’ and ‘Real’s Not Real’ – what the carpenters might have sounded like had they existed entirely on vegemite and weed – it’s a dizzying, dazzling display which addresses a number of pertinent environmental issues along the way. “we tried to make a blues record,” says frontman Stu Mackenzie. “a blues-boogie-shuffle-kinda-thing, but the songs kept fighting it – or maybe it was us fighting them. ultimately though we let the songs guide us this time; we let them have their own personalities and forge their own path. paths of light, paths of darkness. this is a collection of songs that went on wild journeys of transformation.”

Created by Jason Galea

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard return on Friday April 26th 2019 with a new album “Fishing for Fishies”perhaps their most perfectly-realised album to date. Released on Flightless Records world-wide, here is a world where the organic meets the automated; where the rustic meets the robotic. Where the past and future collide in the beautiful present. Having returned in late January with a regulation mind-blowing video to Cyboogie, the first track to be taken from the album, the band have today shared their latest Jason Galea directed video to the album’s title track, Fishing For Fishies.

The fourteenth album since their 2012 debut – and their first following the release of five vastly different albums in 2017 – Fishing for Fishies is a blues-infused blast of sonic boogie that struts and shimmies through several moods and terrains. From the soft shuffle Outback country of the opening title track through the sunny easy listening of ‘The Bird Song’ (think the lysergically-soaked Laurel Canyon circa 1973) and on through the party funk of ‘Plastic Boogie’ (which somehow summons the spirit of Stevie Wonder’s Innervisions) the road-trucking, Doors-like highway rock of ‘The Cruel Millennial’ and ‘Real’s Not Real’ – it’s a dizzying, dazzling display which addresses a number of pertinent environmental issues along the way.

“We tried to make a blues record,” says frontman Stu Mackenzie. “A blues-boogie-shuffle-kinda-thing, but the songs kept fighting it – or maybe it was us fighting them. Ultimately though we let the songs guide us this time; we let them have their own personalities and forge their own path. Paths of light, paths of darkness. This is a collection of songs that went on wild journeys of transformation.”

Quiet though it was on the record front, 2018 was hardly a year of rest – almost in perpetual motion, they continued their un-stoppable rise as their juggernaut of a live show grew, and grew, and grew with a mind-blowing headline slot at last year’s Green Man Festival, a massive sold-out U.S. tour in the summer which saw them play their biggest venues to date, a brain-frying sold out Brixton Academy show, 2 gigs in Russia & Istanbul in March where they played in front of over 15,000 people and putting on the 4th edition of their annual ‘Gizzfest’ in Melbourne amongst the highlights.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard are: Stu Mackenzie (vocals/guitar/flute), Ambrose Kenny-Smith (harmonica/vocals), Cook Craig (guitar/vocals), Eric Moore (drums), Joey Walker (guitar), Lucas Skinner (bass) & Michael Cavanagh (drums).

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard return with their first new music since 2017. Cyboogie b/w Acarine is a limited-edition 7” featuring two brand new songs from Australia’s freewheeling seven-piece band.  “Cyboogie” is a step in a new direction for Gizz with five of the seven members playing synth on the track and not a guitar in sight. It’s an incredibly fun, upbeat disco boogie track reminiscent of Stevie Wonder, Devo, Trans era Neil Young and everything that is good.

Cyboogie comes complete with a regulation Jason Galea video, which sees the band cast as a bunch of identikit analogue droogs.

 

Gizzheads have been eagerly awaiting the reissues of King Gizzard’s first 4 LPs + the Willoughby’s Beach EP. With no new material being released this year (as opposed to last year’s 5 albums…) Flightless Records has in the midst of some extensive touring finally made these gems available for the fans that weren’t around for the first few years of The Gizzness. The prices of the original pressings has skyrocketed hand-in-hand with the popularity of the band over the last few years, and value has been pretty stable inbetween 400-900 USDs pr LP for a couple of years already..

Flightless Records opened up orders on their website a couple of weeks back for some really cool mailorder exclusives (most still available HERE), but as it turns out the most limited variants will be the ones that they’re distributing via ATO in the US (very limited quantities also available via Discrepancy Records and JB Hi-Fi in AU).

Flightless stated that after an extreme internet meltdown that has been immortalised the Gizz folklore, we are proud to announce that the REISSUES will be on sale at 9am AEST Wednesday September 19, 2018.

The Gizzmaster, Stu Mackenzie announced a while ago that all of the reissues are original Flightless Records pressings, with variants to be distributed by their affiliates in the US (ATO) and EU/UK (Heavenly Recordings). There has been no wording as of yet by Heavenly, but at this point one can only assume that they will eventually be stocking the standard Black Vinyl pressings of the albums.

12 BAR BRUISE
‘Muckraker Edition’

“12 Bar Bruise” is being reissued on Doublemint Green colored vinyl and features new artwork re-imagined by Jason Galea. Packaging includes a 350gsm heavyweight sleeve with semi-gloss finish and an inner sleeve on 170gsm uncoated offset paper with new blurb from Stu.

– Clear with heavy doublemint and deep purple splatter
– 140-160 gram 12″ 33rpm vinyl
– 350 gsm heavy sleeve with semi-gloss varnish
– Inner-sleeves printed on uncoated offset paper
– New inner-sleeve design with blurb written by Stu

Re-imagined artwork by Jason Galea
Record packed & shipped in a poly bag outside of sleeve

EYES LIKE THE SKY
‘Gun Smoke Edition’

“Eyes Like The Sky” is being reissued on Halloween Orange colored vinyl and features new artwork re-imagined by Jason Galea. The album is available on 12″ 45rpm for the first time and includes narrative by Broderick Smith printed on a 200gsm inner sleeve with a preface by Stu

– Clear with Aqua Blue smoke
– 140-160 gram 12″ 45rpm vinyl
– 350gsm reverse board finish
– Inner-sleeves printed on 200GSM art paper
– Narrative by Broderick Smith printed on inner-sleeve with preface by Stu

Re-imagined artwork by Jason Galea
Record packed & shipped in a poly bag outside of sleeve

FLOAT ALONG – FILL YOUR LUNGS
‘Kale & Banana Smoothie Edition’

*”Float Along – Fill Your Lungs” is being reissued on Easter Yellow colored vinyl and includes a heavyweight jacket with inner sleeve printed on uncoated offset paper, and a 24″x24″ fold-out poster.

– Pin wheel with Kelly green and piss yellow spokes
– 140-160 gram 12″ 33rpm vinyl
– 350gsm reverse board finish.
– Inner-sleeves printed on 170gsm uncoated offset paper with blurb from Stu
– 24×24” double-sided fold out poster

Original artwork design by Jason Galea
Record packed & shipped in a poly bag outside of sleeve

ODDMENTS
‘Hot Wax Edition’

*“Oddments” is being reissued on Grimace Purple colored vinyl and includes a heavyweight gatefold jacket with original art by Jason Galea and an inner sleeve printed on uncoated offset paper, featuring a new blurb from Stu

– Black & White vinyl with Cyan Blue splatter
– 140-160 gram 12″ 33rpm vinyl
– Gatefold sleeve with original art by Jason Galea
– 350gsm reverse board finish.
– Inner-sleeves printed on 170gsm uncoated offset paper with blurb from Stu

 

 

Record packed & shipped in a poly bag outside of sleeve
Original artwork design by Jason Galea

WILLOUGHBY’S BEACH
‘Ocean Death 12” Edition’

“Willoughby’ Beach” is being reissued on Red(ish) colored vinyl and features re-imagined artwork by Ican Harem. Packaging includes an embossed and spot UV deluxe sleeve with 350gsm reverse board finish and an inner sleeve printed on 170gsm uncoated offset paper.

– A-Side / B-side Reddish with Cyan Blue vinyl
– Printed on 140-160 gram 12″ 45rpm vinyl for the first time
– Inner-sleeves printed on 170gsm uncoated offset paper
– Embossing & Spot UV deluxe sleeve with 350gsm reverse board finish

Re-imagined artwork by Ican Harem
Record packed & shipped in a poly bag outside of sleeve

 

Like a better version of Murder of the Universe, Gizzard’s raw early side is the best. Eyes Like the Sky is the second studio album by Australian psychedelic rock band King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard. It was released on 22nd February 2013 on Flightless Records

Not only is the album unlike any other of theirs, described as a “cult western audio book”, the album is narrated and written by Broderick Smith – who tells a story of outlaws, child soldiers, native Americans and gun fights, all set in the American frontier. As it turns out, the roots of Eyes Like the Sky lie in King Gizzard’s debut album, 12 Bar Bruise.

Stu Mackenzie – “the weird, genius savant of that band” – and Smith both share a similar obsession of the Wild West, so Mackenzie approached his bandmate’s father (who is a respected musician in his own right) to pen the lyrics to a single track he had written. When asked about the album’s influences, Stu Mackenzie alluded to the spaghetti western influence throughout the album, stating “I love Western films. I love bad guys and I love Red Dead Redemption. Oh, and I love evil guitars”

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It was the book My 32 Years Among the Indians by Richard Dodge where Smith found his inspiration.

“There was a section in the book called Sam Cherry’s Last Shot… about Sam Cherry who was a scout that was killed by the Indians.”

Smith took that story and narrated it for the band, and that tune became Sam Cherry’s Last Shot on their debut album. When the band looked at doing a second record, Mackenzie simply contacted Smith and asked if he’d like to do a full album. When it came to a story for the album, Smith again turned to American history. Specifically, he looked at a time in Texas in the 1840’s where Comanches (a population of Native Americans from the south) were raiding white settlements and kidnapping the young boys to raise as their own.

Smith tells. Through this historical lens, he created a story not only about American history, but one that also explores the importance and struggles of heritage and identity.

Let’s now turn to the band itself. Formed out of casual jam sessions with mates, King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard have become a staple on the Australian indie music scene. They have cemented themselves a place among the most ambitious artists in the world today, from having two drummers  to releasing five albums in a single year.

Australian experimentalists King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard was arguably 2017’s most prolific band, releasing five full albums over the course of the year. There was the mind-melt Flying Microtonal Banana; the cyborg-narrated sci-fi trip Murder of the Universe; the yacht-rock/Brit-folk/jazz-fusion collab with Mild High Club, Sketches of Brunswick East; the psych-prog beast let loose for free use, Polygondwanaland; and now the groovy finale, Gumboot Soup, released just under the wire on December 31.

Even more impressive is the vast array of killer songs tucked among this quintet of curiosities. One of our favorites is Polygondwanaland’s final track, “The Fourth Colour,” a meandering yet propulsive groove built on dizzying, circular riffs, feverish drum fills, and a trippy vocal technique called hocketing, in which multiple vocalists sing alternating syllables.

“The Fourth Colour” itself refers to the phenomenon of tetrachromacy. The rare tetrachromat possesses four (instead of three) types of cone cells in the eye, meaning they have the ability to see millions of more colors than the average human. It’s perhaps the essence of psychedelia as we visually interpret it. For the band, it’s a gateway to divinity: “Third eye is free/I am not body/Tetrachromacy,” they chant, before their final words reveal all: “Now I am a god.” At this revelation, the instruments dissolve into a deep-space drone before resurfacing for one final bout of psych-rock delirium.

Fifth album of 2017 and it’s still this amazing. These songs were too good for the albums they were supposed to be on so instead we get a singles collection.

To many it may seem like an impossible task, but for King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard, the notion of releasing five albums in a year is not beyond the realm of possibility. In fact, while some were doubting the band’s plan would come to fruition, the group left it until the last day of the year to prove the doubters wrong, releasing Gumboot Soup overnight.

Following the four albums released this year, including Microtonal Banana, Murder Of The Universe, Sketches Of Brunswick East, and Polygondwanaland, the band had already released a major stack of music,

Image may contain: one or more people and people playing musical instruments

Near the end of last year, King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard promised they’d release five albums by the end of 2017. As we creep closer to the end of this year, the Aussie psych outfit have thus far shared three: Flying Microtonal Banana, Murder of the Universe, and Sketches of Brunswick East (with Mild High Club). They’ll bring the tally up to four this week with the release of their latest full-length effort, Polygondwanaland.

Lead single ‘Crumbling Castle‘ opens the immersively brilliant POLYGONDWANALAND. It’s a mystical, slow-building psych-blues epic. The song sets a fine precedent for an album that listens like a cleverly constructed amalgamation other King Gizzard releases. The 60’s pop relaxation of 2015’s Paper Mache Dream Balloonthe jazzy time signatures of 2017’s Sketches of Brunswick Eastthe trackless rhythmic relentlessness of 2016’s Nonagon Infinitythe microtonal, ancient conjurings of (also) 2017’s Flying Microtonal Bananaand the lyrical stories and themes so strongly present in (also, also) 2017’s Murder of the UniverseThese guys have so richly explored and stretched the boundaries of their own musical and thematic universe that it’s nearly impossible for all their new stuff not to be entirely self-referential. King Gizzard can only sound like King Gizzard, and that’s a really, really awesome thing.

The album’s eponymous second track cruises upliftingly along on the burbling surface that is Gizz’s ever-deepening rivers of intertwining concept-driven song themes and stories. It opens in to the mouth of a swirling ocean, pulsing synth and clever guitar picking that spreads itself across the expansive and catchy ‘The Castle in The Air‘ and ‘Deserted Dunes Welcome Weary Feet‘. These back-to-back tracks will swallow you up in them. Gizzard front man Stu Mackenzie delivers slightly tense, staccato vocals over a somber bass and synth combination.

A hugely 80’s synth warble that’d be at home in the middle of the Stranger Things intro opens ‘Loyalty‘ and ‘Horology‘; a back-to-back psych trip that skips along with whimsical aplomb. Mackenzie unleashes the exceptionally capable flautist within him, making sure Gizz’s trademark of deft musical ability.

Lucas Skinner’s trademark bass wanderings really come to the jazzy surface, then guitarist Joey does some more Mongolian throat singing, then there’s what I believe is a sitar for a bit, and then ‘Tetrachromacy‘ seamlessly begins, Eric and Michael begin to really warm up on the drums, and we change gears once more… goodness gracious. Always on the hunt for new horizons both thematically and musically, Gizz employ that desire and curiosity here more so than any other track on POLYGONDWANALAND. We get our first – and very minimal – taste of Ambrose Smith’s mouth organ skills, dashes of cross-album hook repetition and recycling, more glass/ tubular bells, a lyrical querying of undiscovered colours near blue, flute throughout, and some seriously swift rolls and fills from the beguilingly synchronized actions of dual-percussionists Michael Cavanagh and Eric Moore (who also runs Flightless Records while seamlessly doing tandem drumming across some seriously complicated musical structures .

The album expansively closes with the hypnotic and polysyllabic wanderings of ‘Searching‘; heavily 60’s stoner psych journey in to introspection, and finally ‘The Fourth Colour‘; a staggeringly large and complicated song that both drifts and turns corners.  It’s a rollicking album closer.  Just put POLYGONDWANALAND on repeat and keep discovering.

If King Gizzard and the Lizard didn’t release another LP for a decade, their musical output within this year alone would still eclipse most (if not all) multi-millionaire, studio-backed, advertising-funded, marketing-think-tanked pop-star’s album releases by a wide margin. And they did it in their own houses, with their own equipment, under their own record label, while touring the world to sold out shows, running their own music festival, making half a dozen film clips, and personally sending you the merch and records from each release to save on overheads.

Tracklist:

0:00 – Crumbling Castle 10:44 – Polygondwanaland 14:16 – The Castle In The Air 17:04 – Deserted Dunes Welcome Weary Feet 20:38 – Inner Cell 24:35 – Loyalty 28:13 – Horology 31:06 – Tetrachromacy 34:36 – Searching… 37:40 – The Fourth Colour