THURSTON MOORE – ” Klangfarbenmelodie…And The Colorist Strikes Primitiv “

Posted: November 22, 2020 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
Tags: , , , ,
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The solo discography of Sonic Youth co-founder Thurston Moore is littered with limited run work released on small indie labels amid his more blue chip LPs like Psychic Hearts and Demolished Thoughts. This 1995 recording of the guitarist making a free form racket with drummer Tom Surgal, for example, was originally issued only on CD in New Zealand by Bruce Russell of The Dead C. Did this need to be brought to a larger audience by U.K. label Glass Modern on a white vinyl pressing? Maybe not but we should still celebrate it.

Moore is as great an improviser as he is a songwriter and this explosive session is all the proof you’ll need of that. He sticks to a series of ringing tones, peppered with small sprays of feedback that builds and recedes with intensity as the mood and Surgal’s drums strike him. By the end, during the closing piece “Phase II,” he’s releasing little notes and squalls while the drums take control and drive them both toward infinity. Follow them into the light, brothers and sisters.

An extract from the Glass Modern Vinyl Reissue. First time on Vinyl. Originally released on CD only in New Zealand by the Dead C’s Bruce Russel’s label Corpus Hermeticum. New Liner notes by Bruce Russel too. “A 1995 release from the famed Sonic Youth guitarist, this recording sees him paired with free jazz drummer Tom Surgal for a blistering noise set, in keeping with New Zealand noise label Corpus Hermeticum’s aesthetic. The listener should not expect the sweet psychedelic pop of his Psychic Hearts album of the same year; rather, Moore explores his interest in freeform improvisation on this live set recorded in 1994. The recording is lo-fi, but that adds to it’s candid charm, as his guitar thrashing reaches peaks of noise only hinted at in early Sonic Youth. The duo works along lines that are more akin to the Blue Humans — with whom drummer Surgal began — and also seems influenced by such underground acts as Fushitsusha and the Dead C. Moore’s guitar is so distinct, however, that many parts here could be mistaken for a live Sonic Youth recording from that band’s more heady and chaotic ’80s period”

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