Posts Tagged ‘Rhino Records’

Last year Joni Mitchell and Rhino stunned fans with the announcement of the Joni Mitchell Archives, an ongoing series of releases that look back at the career of the multifaceted songwriter, singer, producer, and visual artist. 

Joni Mitchell and Rhino announced the next volume in the series: “The Reprise Albums (1968-1971)”, to be released June 25th, just fifty years and three days after she released the classic album “Blue” on June 22nd, 1971.  This 4-CD or 4-LP set collects her first four albums, which feature some of her most enduring work:Song To A Seagull (featuring the essential tracks “Cactus Tree” and “Marcie”), Clouds (“Chelsea Morning” and “Both Sides Now”), Ladies of the Canyon (“Big Yellow Taxi,” “The Circle Game,” “Woodstock”) and the timeless Blue (featuring “River” and “A Case of You”), which recently landed on Rolling Stone‘s list of 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

Joni Mitchell released Blue, concluding her prolific four album run for Reprise Records with an album considered by many to be one of the greatest of all time. Its stirring, confessional songs have been celebrated by music lovers and critics alike for decades while inspiring a wide variety of artists as diverse as Prince and Taylor Swift. Even today, its stature as a masterpiece continues to grow. Just last year, the album was named #3 on Rolling Stone’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time.” To celebrate the album’s 50th anniversary, Rhino is releasing “The Reprise Albums (1968-1971)” the next installment of the Joni Mitchell Archives series, featuring newly remastered versions of Blue (1971) and the three albums that came before it: Song To A Seagull (1968), Clouds (1969), and Ladies Of The Canyon (1970).

In the case of Song To A Seagull, the original mix has been recently updated by Mitchell and mixer Matt Lee. The cover art for “The Reprise Albums (1968-1971)” features a previously unseen self-portrait Mitchell sketched during the time period. The collection also includes an essay by Grammy winning singer-songwriter Brandi Carlile, another artist who’s been influenced greatly by Mitchell.

All the music on The Reprise Albums (1968-1971)has been newly remastered by Bernie Grundman and it also premieres a new mix ofSong To A Seagull”  by Matt Lee and Joni Mitchell.  In interviews, Joni has applauded her producer David Crosby’s choice to keep her songs sparse as in her live shows, but also expressed dissatisfaction over the chamber reverb that it had been said was baked into the tapes.    The new mix honours the sonic fingerprint of the original while dialling back some of that reverb.  For fans, it will be a whole new way of experiencing Joni’s first artistic statement.

The box set is handsomely packaged in a deluxe slipcase and adorned with a newly discovered self-portrait of the artist from the era.  You’ll also find new liner notes by Brandi Carlile, a friend and admirer of Joni Mitchell and 6-time Grammy winner in her own right. If you purchase directly from Joni Mitchell’s online shop (in the U.S. or through the new EU storefront launched today), you’ll get a 7″x7″ print of the album artwork – one per copy purchased, no matter the format.  But vinyl enthusiasts will want to act quickly on this one, as the LP edition of The Reprise Albums (1968-1971) is limited to just 10,000 copies.

And speaking of Mitchell’s online store, today marks the launch of the first official Joni Mitchell merchandise line.  You’ll find a plethora of exclusive Joni Mitchell Archives-emblazoned memorabilia, as well as album cover T-shirts.

As for the vault material that fans are craving?  Joni and Rhino promise that Joni Mitchell Archives Vol.2: The Reprise Years (1968-1971) will follow later this year with a wealth of unreleased studio and live recordings.  “Mitchell continues to be intimately involved in producing these collections, lending her vision and personal touch to every element of the projects,” Rhino representatives said in the press release.  “Future releases in the Archives series will arrive in a similar manner, with a boxed set focused on studio albums from a specific era, followed by an official Archives release looking at unreleased audio from the same period.”

As Brandi Carlile writes in her notes, “No matter what we are dealing with in these times we can rejoice and know that of all the ages we could have lived through, we lived in the time of Joni Mitchell.”  The four albums on The Reprise Albums (1968-1971) remind us how lucky we are with a stunning portrait of an artist finding her voice.

The Reprise Albums (1968-1971) arrives on 4-CD, limited edition 4-LP, and digital on June 25th.  You can pre-order your set from the links below and preview the set with the new remaster of “A Case of You.”

Joni Mitchell, The Reprise Albums (1968-1971) (Rhino, 2021)

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Stone Temple Pilots are celebrating the 25th anniversary of their 1996 LP “Tiny Music…Songs From the Vatican Gift Shop” by releasing a three-disc/one-LP deluxe edition featuring a remastered version of the original album, alternate versions and mixes of several of the songs, and a complete concert taped at the Club La Vela in Panama City Beach, Florida, on March 14th, 1997. Released 25 years ago on 26th March 1996, the album is a pitch-perfect amalgamation of the band members’ musical personalities, yielding three us #1 hits – “Big Bang Baby,” “Lady Picture Show,” Rhino records announces the upcoming release of a newly remastered version of tiny music… expanded with unreleased studio and live recordings.

It’s coming out July 23rd, but you can hear a previously unreleased version of “Big Bang Baby” right here.

“Tiny Music…Songs From the Vatican Gift Shop” landed in stores after a very difficult period in the group’s history marked by Scott Weiland’s arrest for heroin and cocaine possession and guitarist Dean DeLeo, bassist Robert DeLeo, and drummer Eric Kretz’s decision to form the side project Talk Show with vocalist Dave Coutts.

But they came together with producer Brendan O’Brien in late 1995 at the Westerly Ranch in Santa Ynez, California, to create the album, which generated the hits “Big Bang Baby,” “Trippin’ on a Hole in a Paper Heart,” and “Lady Picture Show.”

“Coming into our third album, we knew we wanted to get into uncharted waters as a band, and not just make an album that was a continuation of the first two, but really experiment with a homegrown mentality,” said Kretz . “Deciding to record in a house instead of a proper studio was our collective first choice. Once we started recording, we tried different songs and different overdubs in every nook and cranny the house had to offer.

For Dean DeLeo, going through the tape vault to assemble this new edition of the album was an emotional experience. “Re-listening to this album brought back some beautiful memories of all of us living, writing, and recording the record in the beautiful Santa Ynez Valley,”  “And of course, every time I revisit this stuff I miss Scott.”

It also gave him the chance to hear music he hadn’t thought about in many years, including “Kretz’s Acoustic Song.” “I always really loved that song, even when Eric laid it out for us back in ’95 or ’96,” DeLeo says. “What I dig most about it is that Eric played everything.” The very first stop on the Tiny Music tour was the Panama City gig they are releasing on the set. It was filmed for an MTV Spring Break special. “Back in 1997, MTV was a tour de force in the music world,” says Kretz. “To play a whole set in the surroundings of a beach with a crowd that was having more fun than us was really fantastic.”

Stone Temple Pilots parted ways with Scott Weiland in 2013, two years before his death. They are now fronted by Jeff Gutt. A year ago, they released their 8th LP, “Perdida”.

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Even beyond the grave, David Bowie continues to gift us new music. On January 8th, what would have been his 74th birthday, two previously unreleased covers will be made available to the public for the very first time. The new Bowie covers are going to be packaged as a limited-edition two-song 7-inch single from Rhino Records. A total of only 8147 copies will be up for grabs, 1000 of which will be cream coloured. Digital downloads and streaming versions are also promised.

The first is Bowie’s take on “Mother”, the 1970 track from John Lennon. This cover was originally recorded in 1998 with the Thin White Duke’s long-time producer Tony Visconti. It was supposed to appear on a Lennon tribute collection, but the release never came to fruition.

Meanwhile, the second offering is a cover of Bob Dylan’s “Tryin’ to Get to Heaven”, taken from his 1997 Grammy-winning album “Time Out of Mind”. Bowie also recorded his reimagining in 1998 while working on his live album LiveAndWell.com that came out the following year.

David Bowie – vocals
Reeves Gabrels – guitars
Tony Visconti – bass, harmony vocals
Andy Newmark – drums
Jordan Ruddess – piano
Richard Barone – harmony vocals

david bowie 74th birthday single john lennon bob dylan David Bowies Unreleased Covers of John Lennon and Bob Dylan Will Finally Be Unearthed for 74th Birthday

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I’ll take Manhattan in a garbage bag with Latin written on it that says “It’s hard to give a shit these days…”

Indeed, Lou Reed always gave off the vibe of someone who didn’t give a shit – and moreover, someone who didn’t take any shit.  But beneath that hip veneer was an artist who cared deeply, and had the talents to express himself and his keenly-felt beliefs in song.  He was ready for a new start in 1988 when he began recording his first album for Sire Records after his second stint at RCA had concluded. New York would be an album-length reflection on the city that had been his muse, as gritty and grimy and thrilling as the city itself.  Recording with just two guitars, bass, and drums, New York was both an answer to the slick, high-gloss 1980s and an embrace of the primal sound of The Velvet Underground.  Upon its release in 1989, Reed’s high-concept, back-to-basics endeavor paid off.  New York earned him a No. 1 single and is still recognized as one of the finest and most cohesive of all his solo albums.  Rhino has just revisited the album as an expansive 3-CD/2-LP/1-DVD box set with a whopping 26 previously unreleased tracks among its treasures.

The decision was made to primarily record the twin guitars first – singer-songwriter-guitarist-producer Reed on the left channel, Mike Rathke on the right channel – then Reed’s vocals and next, co-producer Fred Maher’s drums.  Rob Wasserman would later overdub his bass parts.  This approach ensured that Reed’s dense words would be front and centre.  The rapid-fire, stream-of-consciousness, near-spoken delivery of “Romeo Had Juliette” set the sonic tone for the album: the backings are tight and spare, and never detract from the lyrics (sometimes in free verse without the expected rhyme scheme) yet are still varied in mood and tempo.  Co-producer Maher remembers in David Fricke’s exemplary liner notes that “people were always trying to talk Lou into singing.  But knowing what was quintessential Lou, I wanted to put that voice in front of everything.”

New York offers snapshots of the Koch-era city at the brink, playing like a movie in miniature at 57 minutes.  That length caused consternation for some Sire executives but hardly seems indulgent in the CD/digital era.  Their trepidation over how the album would sound on two sides of vinyl has been rendered moot here, anyway, as it’s presented on two platters (four sides of vinyl) in addition to CD.

Reed’s language is harsh but his attitude is affectionate on “Halloween Parade,” subtitled “AIDS”: “You won’t hear those voices again…you’ll never see those faces again,” he laments.  Underneath the cool aura and descriptions of boozers and hookers, Reed underscored the tremendous loss felt by New York’s artistic community due to the scourge of AIDS.  His heart-breaking realization that “it makes me mad and mad makes me sad/And then I start to freeze…” epitomizes this haunting reflection.

Reed earned a No. 1 single on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart with “Dirty Blvd.”  The three-chord rocker contrasts the rich and the poor in typically frank, blunt terms (“Give me your tired, your poor, I’ll piss on ’em/That’s what the Statue of Bigotry says…”).  But Reed’s comes to the fore with the song’s affection for young Pedro, a victim of child abuse living on welfare at the Wilshire Hotel: “He’s found a book on magic in a garbage can/He looks at the pictures and stares at the cracked ceiling/’At the count of three,’ he says, ‘I hope I can disappear, and fly, fly away.”  Reed’s pal Dion DiMucci brings a bit of New York verisimilitude as he chimes in on the closing background vocals, touchingly affirming Pedro’s prayer.  “Endless Cycle,” too, touches on child abuse and the ravages of drink and drugs over a gentle yet hypnotic, almost country-style gait.

With the aggressive “There Is No Time,” Reed calls for political action.  It’s one of the most urgent tracks on New York and like “Dirty Blvd.,” one that speaks loudly in 2020.  “This is no time for political speech/This is a time for action/Because the future’s within reach/This is the time,” implores Reed before the song concludes in a barrage of feedback.  He’s similarly pointed in the ecologically-minded “Last Great American Whale,” widening his scope to castigate those who would destroy nature.

The bitingly cynical “Busload of Faith” is seemingly a contradiction in terms; Reed observes that “You need a busload of faith to get by” while excoriating those who would profess to espouse faith (“You can’t depend on any churches/Unless there’s a real estate you want to buy”).  It’s one of his darkest lyrics set to one of the album’s most accessible melodies and catchiest choruses.  To a twangy quasi-country beat, a Dylan-esque flow of words, and a poppy refrain, “Sick of You” is startlingly recognizable today as Reed name-checks the Trumps and then-prosecutor Rudy Giuliani among the characters in its increasingly surreal narrative.

On the back cover of the original LP, Reed urged listeners to play New York in one sitting from start to finish, “as though it were a book or movie” – or a play.  On the tour supporting the album, Reed staged five performances on Broadway at the St. James Theatre, which most recently housed the musical Frozen until the outbreak of COVID-19.  The surroundings of the St. James would almost certainly have heightened the inherent theatricality of the song cycle.  The imagery of the “Statue of Bigotry” recurs in “Hold On,” an encapsulation of the darkness that had enveloped the city and that he had catalogued throughout New York.  “You better hold on – something’s happening here,” he intones over a churning but energetic rock rhythm.  That darkness, alas, hasn’t abated; the lyric mentions Michael Stewart and Eleanor Bumpurs, two African-Americans shot by police in 1983 and 1984, respectively.

It’s hard not to draw comparisons between Reed’s turbulent portrayal of New York circa the late eighties with current events today.  On “Xmas in February,” the artist demands attention to be paid to disenfranchised veterans.  Classic rock riffage abounds on “Strawman,” an anthem decrying racism, hypocrisy, and the “greed is good” mentality (“Does anyone really need another President, or the sins of Swaggart Parts 6, 7, 8 and 9/Does anyone need another politician caught with his pants down, money sticking in his hole?”).  He takes further aim at hypocrisy on the punk-ish inner monologue “Good Evening Mr. Waldheim,” pointing his finger not just at the diplomat Kurt Waldheim (whose career ended in a swirl of revelations about his complicity in Nazi war crimes) but also the Pontiff, Jesse Jackson, and Louis Farrakhan.

Yet it’s not all sturm und drang.  Reed co-wrote “Beginning of a Great Adventure” with Mike Rathke.  Over a jazz-inflected, finger-snapping backing, the singer turns to the personal, ruminating on parenthood with wry humour.  (Reed had no children.)  New York ends on a nostalgic note with “Dime Store Mystery,” subtitled “To Andy-honey.”  The Velvet Underground’s Maureen Tucker dropped in on drums for this elegiac but jagged, pensive salute to their old friend Warhol who had died in 1987 at just 58 years old.  This track was recorded live by Reed, Rathke, and Wasserman with Tucker.

The wealth of supplemental material explores New York from every angle.  The second disc reprises the album’s fourteen tracks in sequence from various live performances again featuring Rathke and Wasserman.  On these dates (Washington, DC; Baltimore; London; Richmond, Virginia; Copenhagen; and Upper Darby (outside Philadelphia), PA) which are assembled in the manner of a single concert, Reed and his band played New York for Act One, and a “greatest hits” encore set for Act Two, but that encore is not represented on this disc.  The live take on “Dime Store Mystery” from the Virginia show has Maureen Tucker guesting.  (She and her band Half Japanese opened one leg of the tour.)

A live show from the same 1989 tour, recorded in Montreal, Canada, is included on DVD but again only has Act One of Reed’s touring show.  (It was previously available only on VHS and Laserdisc as The New York Album.)  Reed clearly believed in these songs, uncompromisingly sharing them from city to city and in doing so, revealing the universal truths that propelled them.  Though his vocals were often detached, there’s no doubt in these visceral and utterly confident audio and video performances that he believed every word and knew how to communicate them to an appreciative audience.  In addition to the concert, the DVD also contains two audio bonuses: the entire album in high-resolution stereo, and a chat with the late artist.

The third CD compiles 14 rarities and previously unreleased tracks including rough mixes, work tapes, alternates, the single remix of “Romeo Had Juliette” and its acoustic B-side version of “Busload of Faith,” the non-LP side “The Room,” and live versions of The Velvet Underground’s “Sweet Jane” and Reed’s solo hit “Walk on the Wild Side” from the Richmond second act encore.  Both “Dirty Blvd.” and “Sick of You” are heard in two versions: first, mainly instrumental demos from August 1st, 1988 and then in rough mixes from late in the month made at NYC’s Mediasound studio.  These tracks – many of which were sourced from cassettes now residing in the Lou Reed Archive at the New York Library for the Performing Arts – collectively illustrate how seriously Reed took the recording and compositional aspects of his music; on the work tape of “Endless Cycle,” he sings the bass and drum parts as he envisions them.  There’s terrific energy even on the simple instrumental take of “Last Great American Whale” from a work tape of Reed and Rathke rehearsing.  The frequently raw rough mixes are equally compelling.  Some lack central elements of the finished mixes such as the drums on “Sick of You,” while others like “Strawman” are strong and seemingly finished in their own right.  (Tantalizingly, the notes and images show that more demos and rehearsals relating to New York exist within the Archive, though it’s difficult to argue with the curated selection here.)

It’s no surprise that New York sounds so good on this deluxe set, as it was recorded and mixed by Jeffrey Lesser whose diverse credits include Rupert Holmes’ Widescreen, Barbra Streisand’s Lazy Afternoon, and Strawbs’ Deep Cuts.  (Lesser even provided some background vocals with Reed.)  The stellar remaster comes courtesy of the set’s co-producer, Bill Inglot, and Dan Hersch.  The 3 CDs, 2 LPs, and 1 DVD are housed in what’s by now a familiar Rhino format, the LP-sized hardcover.  The full-sized 16-page booklet has David Fricke’s essay, archivist Don Fleming’s notes, lyrics, original credits, and copious images.

New York just might be Lou Reed’s most powerful solo statement.  More than 30 years on, it’s more relevant than ever as it captures the energy, drama, violence, tension, excitement, sadness, and passion that still animate the city.  Rhino’s deluxe reissue makes for a worthwhile trip back to that dirty boulevard.

New York is available now 

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Joni Mitchell – the artist, songwriter, and singer who has created some of the most influential music of all time – has a reputation for not looking back. Despite her considerable legacy and personal archive full of treasures, it wasn’t until recently that she began began really celebrating her past. Films, tribute concerts, and a recent book of art and lyrics have done their part to reaffirm her influence and artistry in the public consciousness, but now Joni Mitchell has approved something long thought unthinkable; something that will surely leave diehard fans’ jaws on the floor: a series of box sets and archival albums that shows the arc of her artistry, to be released over the next several years. Rhino promises that Joni “has been intimately involved in producing the archive series, lending her vision and personal touch to every element of the project.”

The Five-CD box set kicks off the long awaited ‘Archives’ series

Joni Mitchell opens her vaults for the first time for the Joni Mitchell Archives, a new series of box set releases that will span the next few years and start Next Month with a five-disc box set, “Archives – Volume 1″ and two associated vinyl releases.

Mitchell has been “intimately involved in producing the archive series” and Archives Volume 1: The Early Years (1963-1967) features nearly six hours of unreleased home, live, and radio recordings that flow chronologically to map Joni’s rapid growth as a performer and songwriter during the period leading up to her debut album.

The collection begins in 1963 with her earliest-known recording as a 19-year-old Mitchell performs at CFQC AM, a radio station in her hometown of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The box culminates with a stirring, three-set 1967 nightclub performance recorded at the Canterbury House in Ann Arbor, Michigan. In total, the five-CD box includes 29 original Mitchell compositions that have never been released before with her vocals.

Volume 1: The Early Years (1963-1967) is a five-CD box set 

As you can probably guess, it focuses on the period prior to the release of her 1968 debut album, Song To a Seagull. The staggering 119-track, 5CD box set is a treasure trove of unreleased rarities from her archive, including significant upgrades to certain dubiously sourced radio material – all finally made canon some 50 years on. You’ll hear her perform Child ballads and Guthrie covers in the folk club setting, work out early versions of classics like “Both Sides Now,” “Chelsea Morning,” and “He Comes For Conversation” – the latter with interesting lyric variants – years before their official versions. And you’ll hear 29 previously unheard songs, among them “Jeremy,” “Free Darling,” and “Gemini Twin,” which had been slated for Seagull, plus other early favourites like “Urge For Going,” and “Eastern Rain.” And for the guitarists and banter-lovers, you’ll hear her tune up to those mystifying alternate tunings and tell stories about her songs as she puts them to tape. It totals nearly 6 hours of incredible material, an in-depth testament to the undeniable talent of an artist finding her way, building an impressive oeuvre of original material, and wooing crowds with her stunning music and lyrics.

The box set includes a 40-page booklet that features many unseen photos from Mitchell’s personal collection as well as new liner notes featuring conversations between Cameron Crowe and Mitchell, who recently spent a couple of Sunday afternoons together discussing her archives. Crowe will continue to provide liners for future releases in the series.

Looking back, Mitchell reflects on her early label of “folk singer”: “The early stuff, I shouldn’t be such a snob against it. A lot of these songs, I just lost them. They fell away. They only exist in these recordings. For so long I rebelled against the term, ‘I was never a folk-singer.’ I would get pissed off if they put that label on me. I didn’t think it was a good description of what I was. And then I listened and…it was beautiful. It made me forgive my beginnings. And I had this realisation…I was a folk singer!”

CDs four and five of the box set feature Mitchell’s previously unreleased, entire three- set performance at Canterbury House in 1967. Those three sets are also issued as a special 3LP vinyl package: Live at Canterbury House – 1967.

To complete the physical archive releases, a single 180g vinyl, Early Joni – 1963 features the nine-song CFQC AM performance in her hometown of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Here, the 19-year-old Mitchell performs at her hometown. The next year, she’s working through two sets of folk music in a Yorkville, Toronto folk club and preserving a clutch of favourites on tape at her parents’ house. Just months later, Joni begins writing her own original material, and lays down some early compositions from her apartment in Detroit for her mother Myrtle’s birthday – “Urge For Going,” “Born To Take The Highway,” and “Here Today and Gone Tomorrow.” By August 1965, she’s preparing a demo tape for Jac Holzman of Elektra Records with “Day After Day” – considered her first composition – the unheard tracks “Student Song” and “What Will You Give Me,” plus a cover of “Let It Be Me”! That’s before we get to the wealth of CBC TV recordings, radio sessions from Philadelphia, intimate home tapes of some of her best early work, and recently unearthed tapes from three sets at Canterbury House, Ann Arbor, in October 1967.

This is featured on CD 1 of the box set. The enclosed 40-page booklet features unseen photographs from Mitchell’s personal archives and new liner notes by Cameron Crowe, who will pen the notes for future volumes. The liner notes are drawn from new conversations with Joni Mitchell where she discusses her beginnings as a folk singer, her transition into song writing, and her ascent as an artist.

As an added bonus for collectors, the new Official Joni Mitchell Online Store will offer two additional vinyl variants: a clear vinyl edition of Early Joni – 1963 and a white vinyl configuration of Live At Canterbury House – 1967. Each exclusive colour vinyl configuration will be limited to 1,500 units. No matter your choice of format, if you order from the official store you’ll also get an exclusive 7″x7″ lithograph featuring two images of Joni Mitchell.

The five-CD box set, the 3LP Canterbury package and Early Joni will all be released on 30 October 2020.

One of the more difficult side effects of this very strange year is bidding farewell to a number of musical luminaries due to the COVID-19 pandemic. John Prine‘s passing looms large among them, not only as one of the first cases but in light of the incredible few years he’d had: in 2018, his 18th album The Tree of Forgiveness became his first-ever Top 5 album, and in February 2020, only two months before he died, he earned a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

On October 23rd, fans new and old will have the chance to discover or rediscover what made him such an enduring legend of folk music with the release of a new box set from Rhino Records. Crooked Piece of Time: The Atlantic & Asylum Albums collates his first seven releases from 1971 to 1980, newly remastered and packaged in mini replicas of the original LP jackets. The box, featuring a new painting of Prine by Joshua Petker (inspired by a photo of him taken by Jim Shea), will also include a 20-page booklet featuring new liner notes by David Fricke and poster inserts.

Though an incredibly gifted songwriter, Prine was hiding in plain sight through the late ’60s and early ’70s, delivering mail in Chicago after serving in Vietnam and performing open-mic gigs on the side. But only a few months into his time at the small folk club The Fifth Peg, Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert happened to be in attendance for one of his gigs, and wrote a rapturous review that put Prine on the map. A year later, Kris Kristofferson happened upon a gig, and invited Prine to open for him at The Bitter End in New York City; Jerry Wexler signed him to Atlantic Records off the strength of that performance.

Prine’s song writing catalogue remains among the most evocative American folk music of the late 20th century, and many of his most beloved songs are on this collection, including “Angel From Montgomery,” “Paradise,” “Sam Stone,” “The Great Compromise,” “Christmas In Prison,” “That’s The Way That The World Goes ‘Round” and many more. A host of luminaries have covered his songs over the years, spreading their influence far beyond his original albums, including Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, John Denver, George Strait, Norah Jones, The Everly Brothers, Bette Midler and Tammy Wynette.

Pre-order Crooked Piece of Time at the links below and check out a list of each album included in the set below. Additionally, links are live for new vinyl pressings of the first four albums in this set, due out September 18th.

Crooked Piece of Time: The Atlantic & Asylum Albums (Rhino, 2020)

Disc 1: John Prine (Atlantic SD 8296, 1971) (Amazon U.S. / Amazon U.K. / Amazon Canada)
Disc 2: Diamonds In The Rough (Atlantic SD 7240, 1972) (Amazon U.S. / Amazon U.K. / Amazon Canada)
Disc 3: Sweet Revenge (Atlantic SD 7274, 1973) (Amazon U.S. / Amazon U.K. / Amazon Canada)
Disc 4: Common Sense (Atlantic SD 18127, 1975) (Amazon U.S. / Amazon U.K. / Amazon Canada)
Disc 5: Bruised Orange (Asylum 6E-139, 1978)
Disc 6: Pink Cadillac (Asylum 6E-222, 1979)
Disc 7: Storm Windows (Asylum 6E-286, 1980)

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Wilco’s third album “Summerteeth” is Rhino Record’s latest offering in 2020’s holiday box set season. A 4CD and 5LP edition of the 1999 release, packed with unreleased material, will be issued November 6th.

Wilco have announced that their third LP, 1999’s Summerteeth, will be receiving the Deluxe Edition treatment, set for a November. 6th release. The updated and expanded edition will come in a four-CD or five-LP set.

The four-CD version included a remastered version of the original album and “an entire disc of unreleased studio outtakes, alternate versions and demos that chart the making of the album from song writing demos to alternate studio arrangements to finished masters.” (Quote via press release.) The remaining two discs will be dedicated to a never-before-released live show: “The concert took place late in the Summerteeth tour, on November 1st, 1999 in Colorado at The Boulder Theatre, when the new songs had been road-tested and the band was in top form. Sourced from an uncirculated soundboard recording, it features band members Jeff Tweedy, John Stirratt, Ken Coomer and Jay Bennett.” (Press release.)

The 5-LP vinyl version will not include the Colorado show; instead, it will feature “a special, exclusive performance from early 1999 titled ‘An Unmitigated Disaster,’ a previously unreleased live in-store performance at Tower Records on March 11th, 1999, just two days after the album was released.” (Quote via press release.) The show will only be available in the LP set.

Both physical and digital formats feature a brand-new remaster of the original album by Bob Ludwig, plus two dozen previously unreleased demos, outtakes and alternate versions. Each set features an unreleased live show as well: the CD featuring an extended, soundboard-sourced set at Colorado’s Boulder Theatre recorded on November 1st, 1999 (well into the band’s tour to promote the album), while the LP includes a Tower Records gig in Chicago the week of Summerteeth‘s release, broadcast on radio station WXRT-FM and labeled here as An Unmitigated Disaster. A “Slow Rhodes Version” of the title track, included on the outtakes set,

Recorded through 1997 and 1998 in Willie Nelson’s Texas recording studio and Chicago’s Kingsize Soundlabs – during which, separately, Wilco recorded and released Mermaid Avenue with Billy Bragg, consisting of unused Woody Guthrie lyrics – the follow-up to 1996’s Being There was markedly different from anything Wilco had ever released. Most of the tunes were written by Jeff Tweedy and company in the studio, and for the first time, the band achieved their desired sound with overdubs. While Summerteeth didn’t outsell Being There, it was critically lauded, making No. 8 on the Village Voice‘s annual Pazz & Jop poll that year.

The deluxe Summerteeth features revisited cover artwork with metallic foil packaging by the band’s Grammy-winning art director Lawrence Azerrad. The band’s official store will also sell a limited colour-vinyl edition of the LP box, topping out at 2000 copies. (The general vinyl box will also be limited to 6500 copies.)

Summerteeth Reissue

The Doors went back to basics when they checked into Morrison Hotel for their 1970 studio album. The band’s fifth LP, it’s now being reissued by Rhino on October 9th as a 2-CD/1-LP 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition. This release follows the label’s similar reissues for The Doors’ first four albums including The Soft Parade which expanded their sound to include orchestration. Morrison Hotel got them back to blues-rock in striking fashion.

The box set features original engineer Bruce Botnick’s remastered version of the 1970 album produced by Paul Rothschild on both CD and vinyl. While Morrison Hotel didn’t yield any major chart hits – “You Make Me Real” b/w “Roadhouse Blues” only made it to No. 50 on the Billboard Hot 100 – it’s since been recognized as a powerful full-length album statement. Henry Diltz’s cover photography has since become one of rock’s most familiar images. The LP made it to No. 4 on the albums chart, and became the band’s highest-charting album in the United Kingdom with its No. 12 berth.

The new box set expands the original album with a second disc of 19 outtakes – totalling more than one hour’s worth of session material. Botnick states in the press release, “There are many takes, different arrangements, false starts, and insightful studio conversations between the band – who were in the studio – and producer Paul Rothchild – who was in the control room. It’s like being a fly on the wall.”

Disc Two kicks off with three sessions for “Queen of the Highway” and continues with another three for “Roadhouse Blues,” arguably the album’s most beloved track. The latter song evolved with different bass players including Soft Parade veteran Harvey Brooks and Lonnie Mack. The pseudonymous John Sebastian (appearing as “G. Puglese”) appeared on the final take with Mack on bass. The disc concludes with the “Peace Frog”/”Blue Sunday” session. Along the way, the set presents the previously released outtake “I Will Never Be Untrue” (indicated here as in an unissued version or mix) and outtake jams on Barrett Strong’s Motown classic “Money (That’s What I Want)” and B.B. King’s “Rock Me Baby.”

David Fricke has penned the liner notes which place the album in the context of its creation, when legal troubles plagued Jim Morrison and threatened to curtail the band’s activity. The Morrison Hotel: 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition is due from Rhino on October 9th. You’ll find pre-order links and the track listing below!

The Doors, Morrison Hotel: Deluxe Edition (Elektra/Rhino, 2020) (Amazon U.S. / Amazon U.K. / Amazon Canada)

CD 1: The Original Album (Elektra EKS-75007, 1970)

Side One: Hard Rock Cafe

“Roadhouse Blues”
“Waiting For The Sun”
“You Make Me Real”
“Peace Frog”
“Blue Sunday”
“Ship Of Fools”
Side Two: Morrison Hotel

“Land Ho!”
“The Spy”
“Queen Of The Highway”
“Indian Summer”
“Maggie M’Gill”
CD 2: Mysterious Union

Black Dressed In Leather (“Queen Of The Highway” Sessions)

First Session (11/15/68)

“Queen Of The Highway” (Take 1, She Was A Princess) *
“Queen Of The Highway” (Various Takes) *
“Queen Of The Highway” (Take 44, He Was A Monster) *
Second Session (1/16/69)

“Queen Of The Highway” (Take 12, No One Could Save Her) *
“Queen Of The Highway” (Take 14, Save The Blind Tiger) *
Third Session (Date Unknown)

“Queen Of The Highway” (Take 1, American Boy – American Girl) *
“Queen Of The Highway” (Takes 5, 6 & 9, Dancing Through The Midnight Whirlpool) *
“Queen Of The Highway” (Take 14, Start It All Over) *
“I Will Never Be Untrue” *
“Queen Of The Highway” (Take Unknown) *
Money Beats Soul (“Roadhouse Blues” Sessions)

First Session

“Roadhouse Blues” (Take 14, Keep Your Eyes On The Road) *
“Money (That’s What I Want)” *
“Rock Me Baby” *
Second Session

“Roadhouse Blues” (Takes 6 & 7, Your Hands Upon The Wheel) *
“Roadhouse Blues” (Take 8, We’re Goin’ To The Roadhouse) *
Third Session

“Roadhouse Blues” (Takes 1 & 2, We’re Gonna Have A Real Good Time) *
“Roadhouse Blues” (Takes 5, 6 & 14, Let It Roll Baby Roll) *
Dawn’s Highway (Peace Frog/Blue Sunday Session)

“Peace Frog/Blue Sunday” (Take 4) *
“Peace Frog” (Take 12) *
LP Track Listing

Side One: Hard Rock Cafe

“Roadhouse Blues”
“Waiting For The Sun”
“You Make Me Real”
“Peace Frog”
“Blue Sunday”
“Ship Of Fools”
Side Two: Morrison Hotel

“Land Ho!”
“The Spy”
“Queen Of The Highway”
“Indian Summer”
“Maggie M’Gill”
(*) previously unreleased

Image may contain: one or more people, text that says 'LOUREED REED DVD'

A newly remastered deluxe edition of Lou Reed’s “New York” will include 26 previously unreleased recordings.  The 1989 album will be given its first remastering in a massive deluxe edition by Rhino Records, out September 25th.

Originally released in 1989, New York marked the 15th album of Reed’s solo career. Hailed by critics and fans alike, the LP would go down as one of the rocker’s strongest efforts, earning Reed his first Grammy nomination. Notable tracks from the LP include “Busload of Faith” and the modern rock chart-topper “Dirty Blvd.”

The new expanded reissue of New York will include a remastered version of the original album on CD and vinyl, along with 26 previously unreleased studio and live recordings culled from Reed’s archives. These include demo versions and alternate mixes of many of New York’s songs. Bonus material includes live renditions of the Velvet Underground classic “Sweet Jane” and “Walk on the Wild Side,” Reed’s hit single from 1972’s Transformer. The first CD makes up the remastered album, the second CD consists of live versions and the final disc contains unreleased early versions of the album’s tracks.

A concert film, The New York Album, will also be included in the set. The recording, which captures Reed performing the entire LP live in Montreal at the Theatre St. Denis, was previously released in 1990 on VHS and laserdisc. The long out-of-print video makes its DVD debut here; it’s also being made available on streaming services.

A hardcover book accompanies the New York: Deluxe Edition set. It features new liner notes written by David Fricke, along with essays from archivist Don Fleming. Reed’s widow, Laurie Anderson, and recently deceased music producer Hal Willner also contributed to the book’s publication.

The New York: Deluxe Edition comes out September. 25th. It’s available for pre-order now.

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS - JUNE 18TH: American musician Lou Reed performs live on stage at Carré in Amsterdam, Netherlands on 18th June 1989. (photo by Frans Schellekens/Redferns)

From the first hit to the last breath, where the design and the aesthetic are so in focus to both reality and the magic that is the essence of true creative vision, “Fun House” was the blueprint, the template for what I wanted in Rock n Roll: direct action rhythm where the bass and drums are informed by Urban Blues swing, fire-in-the-hole guitar shred that is way too cool to show off, and a singer who is In the moment alive with all the love, rage, guts and glory that his sonic prayers could beseech. Speaking for anyone who was saved by punk-noise-art-hardcore-psyche-folk-no wave foreverness – Fun House is where it begins, where we all come out to play. – Thurston Moore

Fun House is the raw and beautiful truth, it is beyond categorization, and I’ll be listening to it for the rest of my life. – Flea

“Down On The Street” taught me everything I needed to know about groove to this day.
“T.V. Eye” taught me all I needed to know about how to play a guitar.
“Dirt” killed me… the slow drudge and discord.
“Loose,”, “1970,” “Fun House,” and “L.A. Blues” remain pure motherfucking classics on how rock n’ roll should be done. Period.
This is THE record to have, if you know what the fuck is up. – Duff McKagan

We could go on and on with the famous fan quotes but let’s get to the nitty-gritty because by the time you get to the end of reading this, this f!#@ing boxed set may very well be sold out. This year marks the 50th anniversary of The Stooges’ iconic Fun House record and we’re bringing you an extremely limited, numbered compendium on a whopping 15 LPs. Featured are a newly remastered 2-LP 45 RPM (for highest audio quality) version of the album, the vinyl debut of The Complete Funhouse Sessions, and Have Some Fun: LIVE AT UNGANO’S, a recording of The Stooges performing live in New York City in August 1970, just as Fun House was released.

Rounding out the music in this deluxe set are two mixes of the single “Down On The Street”/“I Feel Alright.” The first is the “Mono Single Edit” released in France, and the other is the unique “Single Mix” that was unreleased until the original 1999 boxed set. Each one is pressed on 7-inch vinyl and presented in a sleeve with reproduction artwork.

Beyond the music, the collection also includes a 28-page booklet with rare photos and extensive liner notes, featuring an essay by Henry Rollins and testimonials penned by an extensive list of rock ‘n’ roll luminaries including Flea, Joan Jett, Shirley Manson, Duff McKagan, Thurston Moore, Tom Morello, Karen O, Mike Watt, and Steven Van Zandt, among others, plus posters, prints, a slipmat, and a 45 adapter.

Exclusive to Rhino.com, “FUN HOUSE 50TH ANNIVERSARY DELUXE EDITION VINYL BOXED SET” is set for a July 17th release

The Set Contains:

  • 15 X 180-gram Black Vinyl LPs
    • 45 RPM Version Of The Album On 2-LP With 4th Side Etching
    • The Complete Fun House Sessions
    • Have Some Fun: Live At Ungano’s
  • 2 Replica Black 7” Vinyl Singles
    • “Down On The Street” (Mono Single Edit)/ “I Feel Alright” (Mono Single Edit) [French Picture Sleeve]
    • “Down On The Street” (Single Mix)/ “I Feel Alright” (Single Mix)
  • 28-Page Book With Rare Photos And An Extensive Essay By Henry Rollins
  • Ephemera Including 2 24″x12″ Posters, 2 12″x12″ Prints, A Slipmat, And A 45-Adapter
  • Gold-foil Stamped Numbering

Strictly Limited, Numbered Edition Of 1970.