Posts Tagged ‘Ian Curtis’

Warner Music will issue a limited edition 40th anniversary version coloured vinyl edition of Joy Division‘s debut studio album “Unknown Pleasures” next month.

The album will be pressed on ‘ruby red’ 180g vinyl and will come packaged in alternative artwork – a white sleeve that resembles the original Peter Saville design concept.

In June 1979, Joy Division released the bleak masterpiece that is ‘Unknown Pleasures’, a record so majestic it changed the face of music. There can’t be many people left in the civilised world who haven’t, at one time or another, sat down and discussed the influence of ‘Unknown Pleasures’ over the last few decades. But reeling off a list of indebted bands that’s longer than time itself is now only one facet of why Joy Division’s first album is so significant.

The story of how Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Ian Curtis teamed up with their peerlessly innovative producer Martin Hannett to make the album is so fascinating that it has provided for more books that most people will read in their lives. That’s to say nothing of the numerous documentaries which have provided a nice little earner on the talking head circuit for anyone who spent more than two weeks in Manchester during the late 1970s. Let’s not forget the two major motion pictures — 24 Hour Party People and Control — that also depicted the album’s recording and which were widely celebrated for it.

This August will see Joy Division’s legendary bass player Peter Hook join forces with The Metropolitan Orchestra to bring his brand new project Joy Division Orchestrated to Australia. The shows will see classic tracks from the seminal UK post-punk outfit performed in a new light with a full orchestral arrangement. This is the first time that an original member of the group has taken part in such a project.

Ahead of the tour, we’ve decided to look back at the group’s 1979 seminal album Unknown Pleasures and the key players outside of the band – Hook, frontman Ian Curtis, drummer Stephen Morris, and guitarist Bernard Sumner – who helped shape the classic release.

Peter Saville – graphic designer

Even if you’re not familiar with the album itself, chances are you’ve seen its cover across someone’s t-shirt in Fitzroy, Newtown or anywhere else across the globe. Saville’s work goes much further than just Joy Division, and subsequently New Order, having gone on to produce artwork for the likes of Peter Gabriel (1986’s So), Martha & The Muffins (1980’s Metro Music), Wham! (1986’s Music From The Edge Of Heaven), Roxy Music (1980’s Flesh & Blood). He was a founding member of Factory Records, the label that would release Joy Division’s work. Last year, he redesigned Burberry’s logo and just this week, he walked the catwalk for Ferragamo.

Martin Hannett – producer

Hannett first met Hook, Curtis and Sumner between 1976 and 1977, when they first appeared as Warsaw and he was booking shows around Manchester; he added Warsaw to his roster soon after. In 1978, Hannett would first work with the group to produce their tracks Digital and Glass. Hannett would ultimately go on to record both Unknown Pleasures and their final work, Closer. He was tasked with producing U2’s debut album, Boy, but passed up the opportunity following the death of Curtis. Hannett work continues to influence long after his own death in 1991, at age 42, helping shape tracks from artists like Happy Mondays, Buzzcocks, Stone Roses and more in their formative years.

Rob Gretton – manager

Gretton met the group soon after they began booking shows with Hannett; it was during 1977 that they crossed paths at Rafters where Gretton was the venue’s resident DJ. He’d recently began managing local acts and the newly renamed Joy Division soon joined this roster. Gretton scored rights for the group’sIdeal For Living back from RCA Records early on and was fundamental in the transition from Joy Division to New Order. Following the dissolution of Factory Records in the ‘90s, he started his own Rob’s Records.

Tony Wilson & Alan Erasmus – Factory Records co-founders

Perhaps at the centre of the Joy Division world is the iconic, and infamous, Factory Records; the label that launched them. Founded in 1978, the label would go on to helm the Madchester music scene, in part through its influence with nightclub The Haçienda, which was co-owned by the members of New Order. Wilson would pass away in 2007, following a long career as a journalist in addition to his many music industry roles. Erasmus has kept a pretty low profile since the closure of Factory Records.

This new coloured vinyl edition of Unknown Pleasures will be released on 14th June 2019.

Lvy524

More stunning live material to come out of the vaults...Ian Curtis, Peter Hook and company recorded this live at the legendary Les Bains Douches in Paris on December 18th, 1979. Containing great versions of Love Will Tear Us Apart, Shadowplay, Atmosphere, Transmission, and more, this is one of the most classic live sets of the group’s storied career.

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In January of 1980 Joy Division kicked off a tour of The Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany with a show at the legendary Paradiso Club in Amsterdam. Little did anyone know that in less than 6 months, Ian Curtis would be dead, and the brief, brilliant run of the group would be over. This is a particularly heavy and deep set, with the band performing at their angular best, and Curtis in top form vocally. Essential live broadcast for any fan of Joy Division.

If you are not already acquainted with this gig at Paradiso in Amsterdam in 1980. Here’s some info from a blog. “The local support didn’t want to play so Joy Division stood in for them. They played two completely different sets for the price of one.” And how it was described in a fanzine at the time: ‘When I arrived at the Paradiso, it appeared that most of the regular visitors had decided to stay at home.

So the JOY DIVISION played for a handful of people only, two long sets, together around 70 minutes of excellent music. At that time only the first album and two singles had been released, so they played a lot of new songs that went down well with the small audience. The gig was (along with the PIL-gig in Bruxelles) the best I have ever seen. Fantastic bass playing by Peter Hook and a strained Ian Curtis.  The Paradiso management had lowered the ceiling to make things more intimate. It was a good idea. Shame to all the people who stayed at home’ SJC This is the most bootlegged live Joy Division show, but I’m not sure any of the bootlegs have sound this good. If they do, I certainly want to snag a copy.

Check the intensity on the live versions of tracks like “Transmission,” “Digital,” and “Disorder,” plus “A Means To An End,” “These Days,” and the timeless “Love Will Tear Us Apart.” 

The British group Joy Division wrote and recorded 43 songs and played over 120 shows in just 29 months between 1978 and 1980.

iancurtis

34 years ago this weekend the Joy Division vocalist and lyricist Ian Curtis, tragically took his own life but the legacy that the post punk pioneer and his songs, have left behind is unmistakable, despite only releasing two full length albums “Unknown Pleasures” and “Closer” his influence is evident in their sound produced by countless bands who continue to be inspired, his baritone vocal, dance style amd minimilistic sound, the tone of Curtis’s voice and the lyrics were huge,

here is a cover of the song “Transmission” slowed down and recorded around the time of LOW’s second album,
next up is the Band PINK MOUNTAINTOPS and their version of “Atomosphere” sounding very much like the Velvet Underground would if they had covered this song

and a version from the seminal goth,punk band THE CURE with “Love Will Tear Us Apart”