Posts Tagged ‘Jagjaguwar Recordings.’

Angel Olsen’s 2016 marvel, My Woman, had been a career breakthrough, but it catalyzed a period of personal tumult, too: a painful breakup, an uneasy recovery, an inadequate reckoning. at home in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge mountains, Olsen penned songs that finally grappled with these troubles, particularly love—how forever is too much to promise, how relationships can lock us into static versions of ourselves, how you can go through hell just to make someone else happy. these heartsore explorations shape “Whole New Mess”.

Getting a glimpse at an alternate take of a classic album is something we’ve seen more and more in the modern era. But with her new album Whole New Mess, a fraternal twin to 2019’s “All Mirror”, songwriter Angel Olsen didn’t have to wander too deeply into the vault. But it’s not merely a “demos collection.” Instead, Olsen reimagines the songs of “All Mirror” in compelling and strange ways, documenting the way songs change and morph over time in an adventurous creator’s hands.

“If I’d wanted to release demos, it wouldn’t sound this way,” Olsen says of her first proper solo album since 2012. “The sonics would be very different if I’d just recorded it myself. I was still in the process of going through a lot of the material emotionally. I just wanted to have an account of how I would’ve done it without someone really stirring the pot.”

Olsen’s first solo album since her 2012 debut and an emotional portrait so intimate and vulnerable you can hear her find meaning in these crises in real-time. at least nine of the eleven songs on Whole New Mess should sound familiar to anyone who has heard All Mirrors, Olsen’s grand 2019 masterpiece that earned high honours on prestigious year-end lists and glossy spreads in stylish magazines. “lark,” “summer,” “chance”—they are all here, at least in some skeletal form and with slightly different titles. but these are not the demos for all mirrors. instead, Whole New Mess is its own record with its own immovable mood, with Olsen working through her open wounds and raw nerves with just a few guitars and some microphones, isolated in a century-old church in the pacific northwest.

“Waving, Smiling” from ’Whole New Mess’ by Angel Olsen, out on Jagjaguwar August 28th, 2020

Though its track list overlaps with her last record, this new project illustrates how songs can change over time. Much in the same way that a song’s meaning can soften and reshape itself over time for its author, here the material Olsen is working with is akin to metal freshly pulled from a forge, pliable into the forms that still hot emotions could bring about.

If the lavish orchestral arrangements and cinematic scope of All Mirrors are the sound of Olsen preparing her scars for the wider world to see, Whole New Mess is the sound of her first figuring out their shape, making sense for herself of these injuries. considered alongside All Mirrors, Whole New Mess is a poignant and pointed reminder that songs are more than mere collections of words, chords, and even melodies. They are webs of moods and moments and ideas, qualities that can change from one month to the next and can say just as much as the perfect progression or an exquisite chord. in that sense, these 11 songs—solitary, frank, and unflinching examinations of what it’s like to love, lose, and survive—are entirely new. this is the sound of Angel Olsen, sorting through the kind of trouble we’ve all known, as if just for herself and whoever else needs it

Pic by Jess Gleeson

Australian folk-pop singer and producer Gordi is set to play her official international album launch show for her latest record, “Our Two Skins”, released Friday 26th June. Gordi Performed a full set with her four-piece band, this special one-off event will be Gordi’s debut Opera House performance,

Gordi launched her new album “Our Two Skins” to stunning effect across the weekend, performing in the picturesque surrounds of Sydney Opera House’s Joan Sutherland Theatre.

The special launch show featured Gordi performing to an empty room at the iconic venue as part of its From Our House to Yours digital program, which has seen fans gifted exclusive content from the venue’s archives (including this performance from Empire Of The Sun). The album has received critical acclaim and many blogs have it as their Album Of The Week, describing it as “a ten-song story of love, acceptance and self-discovery”.

Setlist:
Introduction 00:00 Aeroplane Bathrooms 01:36 Volcanic 07:57 On My Side 11:25 Can We Work It Out 16:16 Extraordinary Life 20:56 Heaven I Know 26:16 Sandwiches 32:51 Unready 37:47

Our Two Skins chronicles the intense and impossible time Gordi spent renegotiating who she is and how she fits in the world. The writing of the album began after a nervous breakdown while pacing around an Etihad flight from Australia to Europe in late 2017. Sophie Payten, known professionally as Gordi, had finished exams to earn a medical degree and after trading her “nice, safe relationship” for a new one, she began coming to terms with a new truth in her identity. That identity struggle and her new relationship, which played out against the backdrop of the marriage equality plebiscite in Australia. Gordi’s versatility as a musician combined with her open and disarming disposition have helped establish her as an in-demand collaborator. Payten has collaborated with artists including Bon Iver, Alex Somers, Julien Baker, The Tallest Man On Earth, Asgeir, Fleet Foxes and many more, helping shape her artistic voice.

Album single Unready’s music video also featured a very special cameo appearance from Family Guy and The Marvelous Mrs Maisel’s Alex Borstein.

Gordi is set to embark on an Aussie tour in October, ‘Our Two Skins’ out June 26th Jagjaguwar Recordings.

Max Clarke, aka Cutworms returns with “Castle in the Clouds,” and an accompanying video. Clarke wrote “Castle in the Clouds” in April 2019, after tours supporting his 2017 EP Alien Sunset and 2018’s Hollow Ground. The songs came quick, then, too many to count. Eschewing demos for in-studio spontaneity, he finished “Castle in the Clouds” on a flight to Memphis, TN, and then recorded it the next day at Sam Phillips Studio with Matt Ross-Spang (John Prine, Jason Isbell, Margo Price). The resulting track is somewhere between a lonesome cowboy lullaby for the restless, and a doo-wop sci-fi elegy for the daydreaming teenagers of Mars. Its video, homemade by Clarke, pulls together luminous animations and mid-20th century stock footage.

Cut Worms, moniker of Brooklyn-based singer/songwriter and multi-disciplined visual artist Max Clarke, announces his new double album, “Nobody Lives Here Anymore”, out October 9th on Jagjaguwar Recordings. Today, he presents two new singles – “Sold My Soul” with an accompanying video and “God Bless The Day.” Nobody Lives Here Anymore is the haunted reverie of an American landscape in-and-out of Max’s mind. Recorded between May and November 2019 in Memphis, Tennessee, the album is a snow globe of the mid-twentieth-century’s popular music filled with jangling guitars, honkey tonk pianos, and Telstar organs.

“‘Castle in the Clouds’ was the first one we did,” says Clarke. “I remember being in the studio, thinking the control room looked like the bridge on a spaceship. It reminded me of the old Carl Sagan Cosmos, where he’s kind of hovering above, transporting you across the universe. I always really liked the theme song. I think that spirit found its way onto the recording.”

Max immediately started writing material for his sophomore LP after an extensive eighteen-months of touring in support of 2017’s Alien Sunset and 2018’s Hollow Ground. Mining his life-long devotion to the lost American songbook for inspiration, he stockpiled nearly thirty new songs  Unlike earlier works that were meticulously demoed, Max opted for rough drafts to capture something more immediate and honest. Most of the initial takes were tracked live with Noah Bond on drums, while Max sang and played rhythm guitar. Max then built lush arrangements around these intimate performances. A skeleton crew of friends and Memphis all-stars were called in to lay down pedal steel, sax, and strings. When all was said and done, they had recorded 17 new cosmic Americana gems.

“Sold My Soul” and “God Bless The Day” follow previously released singles “Unnatural Disaster,” “Baby Come On,” and “Castle in the Clouds.” “Sold My Soul” takes a look back and ahead at the choices we make, with a thinly veiled punchline to soften the blow. Over jaunty guitar, Max’s voice is expressive as he sings “I sold my soul somewhere so long ago // Oh I didn’t think too much at the time I was young and I didn’t know // oh till I saw it late one night on the antique road show // expert collectors to appraise.” The accompanying video, directed and shot by Caroline Gohlke on Route 66 from Chicago to Oklahoma, captures the aura of stumbling through a deserted time.

Max sees this record as a figurative shot across the bow to the modern attention span. He says Nobody Lives Here Anymore is about “throwaway consumer culture and how the postwar commercial wet dreams never came true, how nothing is made to last.” He considers the golden years of a society on its last leg with poignant curiosity, suggesting not only that nobody lives the American dream, but that nobody lives here, in this moment, anymore. “It’s about homesickness for childhood, for a place that never really existed,” says Max.

A loss of innocence lingers through this 80-minute opus as Max attempts to harbour love and meaning inside a world that sold itself out. While his grand anthems overflow with timeless pop charm, his ability to dig deeper than lollipops and holding hands sets his work apart from the days of 45s and Top of the Pops.

“Nobody Lives Here Anymore” the new album by Cut Worms out now on Jagjaguwar Recordings.

Losing someone close to you creates an almost phantom limb-like effect. Often, it feels like they’re a phone call away. But that instant between when you reach for the phone and when your brain delivers the new reality to you is a strange, momentary eternity. It’s both an uncompromising void and maybe as close as you’ll ever come to communing with that loved one again.

Gordi wrote “Sandwiches” as a tribute to the matriarch of her family. Her late grandmother was, in Gordi’s words, “a great feeder of people.” So when she fell ill, Gordi and her mother took it upon themselves to nourish the visitors gathered around her hospital bed. As they passed around sandwiches, “someone called out that she was gone.”

Gordi called on long-time collaborators and Bon Iver production duo Chris Messina and Zach Hanson to make “Sandwiches” at her family home in Canowindra, Australia — an old cottage littered with some of Sophie’s favourite pieces of musical arsenal combined with some flown in from Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The tiny farm town where her family has lived for over a century, Canowindra, and the heart of the matriarch, is embedded in this song.

The writing of Our Two Skins began after a nervous breakdown while pacing around an Etihad flight from Australia to Europe in late 2017.  Payten had finished exams to earn a medical degree and after trading her “nice, safe relationship” for a new one, she began coming to terms with a new truth in her identity.  That identity struggle and her new relationship, which played out against the backdrop of the marriage equality plebiscite in Australia and her Catholic upbringing, led to an isolated internal state. That state was further fueled by distance, trying communication and lost loved ones.  Our Two Skins chronicles the intense and impossible time Payten spent renegotiating who she is and how she fits in the world.

The imagery for ‘Our Two Skins’ was created during the drought and before the most extensive bushfires Australia has ever seen last summer.

It captured the unrelenting and deceptively positive blue sky keep watch over a dusty, dead orange landscape. A mirage of hope and dread.

The colour palette was actualised in my favourite variant of the 12″ vinyl. I’ve been told there’s only a few copies left. If you haven’t already,

In 20 anxious minutes on that lonely flight to an isolated six weeks in Europe, Payten penned the album opener “Aeroplane Bathroom”.  She recalls that time, “I had that sensation of being trapped so I climbed over the other passengers and tried to escape to the bathroom. The fluorescent lights in those spaces are most unforgiving. A terrible mirror.”

“This song is about feeling isolated. It comes at a very strange time now given we’re all locking ourselves in our homes, ‘socially isolating’ from our normal functional lives. There is no more dehumanising experience than to be cut off from everything you know. It can plunge you into total despair.”

Payten’s disposition is open and charming. She says, “A big theme of the record is: there’s nothing to hide behind. We didn’t have all the bells and whistles. You’re just standing there, with your hands in your pockets going: this is me. This is it. This is all I have.“

“Extraordinary Life” the new song by Gordi off ‘Our Two Skins’ out June 26 on Jagjaguwar Records.

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Australian musician Gordi shares the new single, “Volcanic,” from her new album, Our Two Skins, on Jagjaguwar Records. The release date for Our Two Skins has moved to June 26th due to disruptions related to COVID-19. Following previously released songs “Aeroplane Bathroom” and “Sandwiches,” “Volcanic” fizzles with a sense of urgency and swirling mania. Payten wrote the track in 2018 while in Sweden, when travelling with her parents and grappling with a new truth in her identity, against the backdrop of a Christian family and Australia’s same-sex marriage vote. The instrumentation came out of hours sitting at the piano behind the kitchen at Berlin’s Michelberger Hotel during PEOPLE Festival, the piano of which made it into the final version on the record (if you listen hard you can hear plates, pots and pans clinking from the kitchen). “Volcanic” is cathartic, driven by Payten’s deeply rich voice and frank lyrics.

“It speaks to a rush of anxiety – about why, about what is real and what is not, about the drama of it, about the vortex of it,” says Payten. “When it surges you can feel paralysed and out of control at the same time – ‘shut down’ and ‘manic.’ Its self-destructive nature can be so crippling. I wanted the song to feel like a wave of anxiety. The tempo never changes but the piano solo starts at half-time and rushes until it is double the speed, though the beat never changes. And then suddenly; it’s over.”

The accompanying video was directed by Madeleine Purdy and shot around Payten’s hometown of Canowindra, mostly on her family’s property.

“Volcanic” the new song by Gordi off ‘Our Two Skins’ out June 26th on Jagjaguwar

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A couple old unreleased tracks are out now: A version of “Alien Sunset” that was Cut from “Hollow Ground” for reasons I don’t recall. features @jonathanrado (who also produced it) on Drums, percussion, and I think some keyboards? and a demo called “Conspiracy Theorist Blues”

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released May 1st, 2020

Alien Sunset recorded July 2016 Los Angeles, CA at Dream Star Studios
outtake from JAG310 LP Hollow Ground

Produced by Jonathan Rado
All instruments and voices, Max Clarke
except drums, percussion, keys Jonathan Rado

In early 2003 a young Steve McBean was living in Vancouver and in the midst of a transition from his sorely overlooked rock band Jerk With A Bomb into an auspicious new chapter. JWAB was his umpteenth band in as many years woodshedding as both a front-man and a supporting musician in countless punk & hard core bands in the Canadian wilds starting in his teens and going through his twenties. JWAB was arguably the band in which he’d finally found his signature singing voice and started collaborating with drummer Joshua Wells and vocalist Amber Webber.

Around this time his friend Dan Bejar (Destroyer, New Pornographers) sent to Jagjaguwar a demo tape of new songs that Steve had been writing. He wasn’t sure if it they were JWAB songs or something new entirely. The songs were randy & ribald, with a primitive drum machine beat and a Bo Diddley guitar swagger. They were scintillating and taught us things that our parents were too scared to teach. These were the demos for the songs that would be re-recorded as the debut album by Pink Mountaintops, a sister project to the other McBean-fronted rock band that was being born at the same time — Black Mountain. This was an exciting time not only for McBean — who was bubbling with songs & ideas — but a turning point for Jagjaguwar, thrilled to sign two of its most significant projects simultaneously.

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We’re very pleased to be able to share these first demos which bred so much inspiration and provided a horny clarion call for things to come.

released May 1, 2020

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Kaya Wilkins—under the moniker Okay Kaya—is one of indie label Jagjaguwar’s freshest faces, but her latest single “Baby Little Tween” puts the new artist right at the level of her beloved labelmates Sharon Van Etten and Angel Olsen. The single is just one piece of her debut project on Jagjaguwar, Watch This Liquid Pour Itself, which shows Wilkins coming to terms with a former identity.

Album opener “Baby Little Tween” rests upon delicate, watery synths that cradle Wilkins’ half-whispered realizations. As the song picks up into a groove, she self-harmonizes, singing, “I used to be inspired / Used to feel something / I used to fight the feeling always let it win.” Sung through Wilkins’ multiple voices, these lyrical bridges between her two identities become even more apparent.

Baby Little Tween’ from ‘Watch This Liquid Pour Itself’ by Okay Kaya, available January 24th, 2020 on Jagjaguwar

Nap Eyes will release their new album, “Snapshot of a Beginner”, their most concentrated and hi-fi effort to date, on March 27th via Jagjaguwar / Royal Mountain, in partnership with Paradise of Bachelors. Throughout the album, there’s an immediately noticeable leap in arrangement and muscle, one that still holds the raw, nervous energy and the earnest, self-deprecating poetry that make Nap Eyes an enduring cult favorite. The music still brings to mind the bucolic ennui of the Silver Jews and Daniel Johnston’s jittery naïveté, but the new sheen and maturity also now brings to mind the wide-angle appeal of The Jayhawks and the addictive brightness of Green Day’s Kerplunk!.

Lead single “Mark Zuckerberg” is a hi-fi jangle-pop earworm that, at its outset, sounds like it could be the theme song from Party of Five. Less a takedown of any one specific, capitalist tech fascist than it is a poem about the confounding and beautiful swirl of modern life, it is their thoughtful, incisive Hit for The People. “Transcendence is all around us,” Chapman repeats, a freeing incantation and a gift to us all as the coda slows and expands.

On the video, the band notes: “People are scared of Mark Zuckerberg. You look at him before Congress and think, ‘Is this the bogeyman? Is he a CIA plant? Can he read my mind with some sort of God-mode search feature in all my chat transcripts?’ This video leads us to believe that Mark wants to enjoy and surveil whatever world he inhabits, whether it’s starting a band with ghastly apparitions in the spirit realm or changing size according to his whim while observing natural and urban landscapes with equal awe. He wants you to accept his friend request and let him watch over you. ‘When there was only one set of footprints in the sand…’”

Almost all the songs of Nap Eyes are whittled into their final form from frontman Nigel Chapman’s unspooling, 20-minute voice-and-guitar free-writing sessions. Each member — drummer Seamus Dalton, bassist Josh Salter and guitarist Brad Loughead — then plays a crucial role in song development, composing around the idiosyncratic structures and directing the overall sound and feel of the songs.

‘Mark Zuckerberg’ from ’Snapshot of a Beginner’ by Nap Eyes, available March 27th, 2020 on Jagjaguwar

Bon Iver’s “Blood Bank” is “arguably the most consequential EP of the 2000s” and now, the group announces its 10th Anniversary  reissue. Released 11 years ago yesterday (we know), and coming March 27th on Jagjaguwar, the package pairs each of the original four songs with brand new live renditions recorded during shows in Stockholm, Dallas, London, and Paris.

Similar to how the first Blood Bank followed For Emma, Forever Ago, the reissue forecasts the evolution of Bon Iver as the project expands to new breadths of sound and community. In its new liner notes, Wisconsinite Ryan Matteson reflects on the mantras of Blood Bank and the growth of Bon Iver, writing how songs like “Woods” heralded “not just a new direction but a new beginning entirely. A place where boundaries don’t exist. It was a signal change of things to come, laying the groundwork for new collaborations.”

Bon Iver performed music from Blood Bank throughout their 2019 arena tour supporting new album i,i. That tour will extend through November 2020 with a series of just-added European dates

The reissue will feature new artwork by Eric Timothy Carlson, both original and brand new live renditions of each track, and an in-depth essay written by longtime Bon Iver friend Ryan Matteson.

Side A:
01 – Blood Bank
02 – Beach Baby
03 – Babys
04 – Woods

Side B:
05 – Blood Bank (Live from Ericsson Globe, Stockholm SE, Oct 31 2018)
06 – Beach Baby (Live from The Bomb Factory, Dallas TX, Jan 23 2018)
07 – Babys (Live from Eventim Apollo Hammersmith, London UK, Mar 4 2018)
08 – Woods (Live from Pitchfork Paris Presented by La Blogothèque, Nov 3 2018)

Blood Bank (10th Anniversary Edition) – out March 27, 2020 via Jagjaguwar Recordings.