Posts Tagged ‘Fire Talk Records’

Mamalarky’s indie rock summons an easy and pure joy. Like stepping out from under a tree canopy and into the sun, or feeling the first kick of wind on a hot, sticky day. It’s that sort of gentle wonder that the Los Angeles-based quartet — comprised of ex-Cherry Glazer bassist Livvy Bennett, drummer Dylan Hill, keyboardist Michael Hunter, and bassist Noor Khan channels on their latest song, The song’s bright guitar licks and Bennet’s fuzzy vocals go down like the sweetest little package. As Bennet’s inquisitive lyrics wonder.

While “Schism Trek,” the first single from Mamalarky‘s self-titled debut album took on a more rocking edge, “You Make Me Smile” is a more laid-back affair. With light, precise instrumentation and dreamy vocals, it shows the versatility of the Atlanta quartet.

A new single from Mamalarky out October 14th on Fire Talk Records.

Wish You Hadn’t, was the debut EP from Philadelphia’s Corey Flood, was both unnerving and calm—hushed vocals and plaintive pop melodies softened their brooding guitars. Now, two years later, their debut full-length “Hanging Garden” is out, and it has a similar wired fuzziness, but their melodies are a bit sunnier this time. Although their distorted post-punk is still fairly grey-skied, their classic indie-pop sweetness is a small break in the clouds. Lines like “Maybe it is really nothing / but I was in love” from the driving jam “Down the Hill” underscore their melancholia perfectly. Their abstract, evocative lyrics are deeply contemplative cyclones—just like their saw-toothed guitars will rattle around your brain, thoughts swirl until they begin to fester, gnawing at one’s psyche.

Corey Flood’s first EP was self-described as “basement goth”: a dark, brooding rock record that nestled itself in the corners of the listener’s mind. Their debut full-length, out today on Fire Talks, follows along a similar path, but given the extra room to move around, the Philly-based trio (Ivy Gray-Klein on vocals and bass; Em Boltz on vocals and guitar; Juliette Rando on drums) take the time to explore a wider range of sounds and lend a depth to their lyrics.

With simple melodies repeated in each song, Hanging Garden can put the listener in a dream-like state and flow seamlessly from one song into another, but listen closer and you can hear ideas running throughout the album: an atmosphere of distrust, strained relationships, and recklessness versus caution.

From Corey Flood’s debut album ‘Hanging Garden’ Out September 4th 2020 on Fire Talk.

Chicago’s beloved rock trio Dehd have released a new single, “Month,” from their forthcoming sophomore LP “Flowers of Devotion”, The album released July 17th via Fire Talk. This follows the release of “Flood” and “Loner,” which both portray the thoughtful direction Dehd is heading in with this new record. This track is softer and slower than most of their material, vibrating with quiet harmonies and tame riffs. With Jason Balla’s vocals at the forefront, he grapples with time and the way it affects his feelings.

Jason Balla cooly alludes to “This never-ending new summer feeling.” I imagine this wasn’t the summer feeling he had in mind when he wrote “Month,” but at this point it’s gonna be hard to untangle the two most monumental events to hit the city in the summer of 2020.

From Dehd’s new album “Flower of Devotion” out July 17th on Fire Talk

“I want nothing more than to be a loner,” Emily Kempf sings early on “Flower of Devotion”, the new album by Chicago trio Dehd. It’s a startling admission coming from a songwriter who, just a year ago on Dehd’s critically acclaimed “Water”, wrote eloquently about the joys and pains — more than anything, the necessity — of love, compassion, and companionship. But then, “admission” isn’t really the right word here, given the stridency of Kempf’s tone. “Loner” is a declaration.

The record ups the ante on Dehd’s sound & filters in just enough polish to bring out the shining and melancholy undertones in Jason Balla and Emily Kempf’s songwriting, even as it captures them at their most strident. Balla’s guitar lines at times flirt with ticklish cosmic country, while at others they reflect the dark marble sounds of Broadcast. Kempf, meanwhile, establishes herself as a singer of incredible expressive range, pinching into a high lonesome wail, letting loose a chirping “ooh!,” pushing her voice below its breaking point and letting it swing down there. When she and Balla bounce descending counter-melodies off one another over McGrady’s one-two thumps, or skitter off over a programmed drum pad, they sound like The B-52s shaking off heartache.

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What makes Flower of Devotion so impressive is how its creation seems to have strengthened its creators, both as individuals and as a unit, even as they’ve stared down their own limitations. It’s also striking just how much fun they seem to be having in the process. “It’s okay to be lighthearted in the face of despair,” Kempf says. It’s a theme that runs through the album, from the opening back-and-forth build of “Desire” to the click-clacking chorus of “Haha,” which finds them deflating their own history. Flower of Devotion was recorded in April and August of 2019 in Chicago.

It will be released on Fire Talk Records on July 17th 2020.
Recorded by Jason Balla & Dehd

Fire Talk is excited to announce the signing & new EP from Cindygod, the project which saw Gauntlet Hair’s Andy Rauworth and Craig Nice reuniting, are announcing their second effort, following their 2018 Demos EP, under the new name with EP2 out August 14th on the label. The lead single “Rhys” takes a darkly sinister route, with Rauworth’s ghostly vocals flickering between Nice’s driving rhythms, culminating in a potent post-punk-meets-new-wave warped reverie. “Rhys” establishes the new direction Cindygod are taking with confoundingly pummeling rhythms cut with oscillating riffs that lend a sonic unease to the lyrical unease at the heart of the first single. EP2 is full of familiar yet skewed sonics, simulacrums of dream pop sit atop menacing angular guitars while the occasional yelps from Rauworth agitate between dreamy synths. The sublimely idiosyncratic amalgam of genres on Cindygod’s EP2 points not only to how far the duo have come since disbanding Gauntlet Hair in 2013 but the new EP succinctly soundtracks our ongoing descent into a fully realized dystopia.

EP2 is the second EP from Cindygod the new project is due out July 10th 2020 on Fire Talk. Stereogum noted 2018’s EP1 filled with “new wave shimmers and hooks… a sort of ramshackle and scrappy charm.” The new EP doubles down on the hollowed-out saccharine sound of Rauworth’s recent work, while retaining glitchy agitated electronics that pierce together the best of dream pop, post-punk and indie nostalgia. Fans of Gauntlet Hair rejoice! Cindygod is an honest creative extension of some of those original ideas, a little darker & sinister around the edges.

Conveniently enough the only song available at this moment(“Rhys”) happens to be absolutely stellar, though if you’re lucky enough to have already heard “Not Right” you might agree that it combines the magic of “Simple” and “Top Bunk” into yet another banger from Andy and Craig. Impossible to pick a favourite track but then if you’re a longtime fan of Gauntlet Hair it’s a familiar and welcome problem to have. Demos B-Sides in due time?.

From Cindygod’s EP 2 Out August 14th on Fire Talk

Chicago trio Dehd will return with their new album “Flower of Devotion”, due out July 17th via Fire Talk. They previously shared lead single “Longer” and have followed that up today with the second single “Flood.” The track’s release comes with a new music video directed by the band’s very own Emily Kempf and Andrew Miller.

“I want nothing more than to be a loner,” Emily Kempf sings early on Flower of Devotion, It’s a startling admission coming from a songwriter who, just a year ago on Dehd’s critically acclaimed Water, wrote eloquently about the joys and pains more than anything, the necessity of love, compassion, and companionship. But then, “admission” isn’t really the right word here, given the stridency of Kempf’s tone. A flood is powerful, uncontrollable, devastating. Water can nourish or destroy.”

The record ups the ante on Dehd’s sound & filters in just enough polish to bring out the shining and melancholy undertones in Jason Balla and Emily Kempf’s songwriting, even as it captures them at their most strident. Balla’s guitar lines at times flirt with ticklish cosmic country, while at others they reflect the dark marble sounds of Broadcast. Kempf, meanwhile, establishes herself as a singer of incredible expressive range, pinching into a high lonesome wail, letting loose a chirping “ooh!,” pushing her voice below its breaking point and letting it swing down there. When she and Balla bounce descending counter-melodies off one another over McGrady’s one-two thumps.

What makes Flower of Devotion so impressive is how its creation seems to have strengthened its creators, both as individuals and as a unit, even as they’ve stared down their own limitations. It’s also striking just how much fun they seem to be having in the process. “It’s okay to be light hearted in the face of despair,” Kempf says. “Flood” is a meditative and atmospheric indie rock offering that carries a great deal of emotional weight and the video perfectly captures this emotive quality visually.

Flower Of Devotion by DEHD out May 22nd on Fire Talk

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Chicago trio Dehd are back with sophomore album “Flower of Devotion”, which will be out June 17th via Fire Talk. “The last record, the vibe was ‘How minimal can it be? What’s the minimum that a song requires to succeed?’ This one was like, ‘How can we make this thing that’s really powerful?,” says singer/guitarist Jason Balla, while singer/bassist Emily Kempf adds, “We didn’t become more perfectionist. We’ve always been really scrappy, but we decided to polish our scrappiness just a little bit.” First single “Loner” is definitely bigger sounding than anything on Dehd’s debut.

“I want nothing more than to be a loner,” Emily Kempf sings early on Flower of Devotion, the new album by Chicago trio Dehd. It’s a startling admission coming from a songwriter who, just a year ago on Dehd’s critically acclaimed Water, wrote eloquently about the joys and pains — more than anything, the necessity — of love, compassion, and companionship. But then, “admission” isn’t really the right word here, given the stridency of Kempf’s tone. “Loner” is a declaration.

Watch the video, which was shot in Joshua Tree and at Chicago’s The Hideout:

From Dehd’s new album “Flower of Devotion” out May 22nd on Fire Talk Records

We couldn’t be more proud to share Deeper‘s sophomore album “Auto-Pain” out today on Fire Talk. Truly love these boys and hope you’ll take some time today to check out the record. The press has been all over it, if you want to dig in more read this excellent feature via Stereogum .

Auto-Pain represents the constant wave of depression felt by many in everyday life. Stemmed from Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’, Auto-Pain is a concept meant to be an inverse to soma, a pill in the book which makes everything numb. The idea of auto-pain is to epitomize the desire to return to a connection with thoughts and clarity, which comes at the expense of feeling everything simultaneously. The album artwork features the now-demolished Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago capturing the band’s rounded-off brutalism, and the album title appears in Urdu, a nod to drummer Shiraz Bhatti’s Pakistani heritage. The record was recorded and mixed by Chicago scene luminary Dave Vetraino (Lala Lala, Dehd) and mastered at Chicago Mastering by Greg Obis (Ne-Hi, Melkbelly).

A portion of the proceeds from Auto-Pain will be donated to Hope For The Day an organization that actively works to break the silence surrounding mental health

From Deeper’s Sophomore album “Auto-Pain” out March 27th on Fire Talk Records.

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Listening to Weeping Icon’s debut album is too enter a dim catacomb of psychical catharsis. Urgent yet calculated riffs rip through a thunderous pummel of percussion, with a blend of punk and psychedelic drumming which carries the songs with an atmosphere of organized chaos. Lyrically they are both serious and sarcastic, trading off vocalists to confront issues central to a generation, dosing listeners with the controlled sense of horror and humour like flavors in a dish.The band’s debut record “Weeping Icon” is a collection of 7 songs that archive the metamorphosis into heavier and more provocative territories.

In keeping with their live performance’s, a sequence of dystopian sound interludes complete the album, serving as guided meditations between the candid subversive fury of the main tracks. Recorded and mixed by Uniform’s Ben Greenberg and mastered by Jonathan Schenke in New York City.

Weeping Icon’s self-titled debut album, out now on Fire Talk and Kanine Records, is a chilling adrenaline rush. It’s the kind of record that will make you run faster out of fear. Their gothic psych-punk is a noisy, dark tunnel, and the only way you can get out is by riding their wave of pummeling rock ‘n’ roll.

It’s an undeniably underground record, and this trio’s maniacal cacophonies will appeal to those on the fringes, but all the better given that New York City has more than enough outsiders.

Weeping Icon’s debut self titled album on Fire Talk Records.

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After a few years of small tours and an EP, Patio have finally put out their great debut album, “Essentials”. The vocals are deadpan and detached as electric guitar shards contribute to their off-kilter post-punk vibe. Essentials is filled with violent visions as a form of release and repair. Alice Suh weaves intricate drumbeat webs over the vocals of Lindsey Paige-McCloy and Loren DiBlasi. Whether airy and aloof or heavy with a lingering drawl, their voices are both eerie and mesmerizing. All at once, Patio are a poignant, dark, grotesque, and really affecting listen.

Post-punk trio Patio happily do more with less. Their 2019 debut album, Essentials, is marked by cutting riffs and chunky bass lines, and while both can easily hold their own, their vocals are particularly mystifying. They take turns on vocal duties—often joining in for harmonies, speaking with detachment or singing gently.

Each mode helps them illustrate complicated relationship dynamics and insecurities, and they often do so with dry humor. In short, Patio make 21st century punk for stylish, antsy twenty somethings desperately clinging to their last ounce of hope.

Patio’s debut album Essentials out April 5th on Fire Talk.