Posts Tagged ‘Domino Records’

English multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter and producer Bill Ryder-Jones is releasing his fourth solo album, Yawn, due on November. 2nd via Domino Records. Ryder-Jones rose to prominence in the ‘90s as a founding member of Wirral pop band The Coral and he also recently played guitar on tour with Arctic Monkeys. In addition to his work in previous bands and his prolific solo career, the 35-year-old Ryder-Jones has also produced records for bands like The Wytches, Hooton Tennis Club, By The Sea and Our Girl. Tuesday, he released a new single from his forthcoming album, “And Then There’s You,” which was recorded and produced almost entirely by Ryder-Jones himself at his Yawn Studios in West Kirby, U.K. Following the lead single “Mither,” this new track proves Ryder-Jones’ classical music upbringing didn’t wear off as its richness, attention to detail and emotional chord progressions indicate his uncanny songwriting skills. His status as crafty wordsmith is also apparent in his use of poetic devices in the song’s chorus: “My mistrust / My mistress / Takes me home again / My mistress / My mistrust / We’re alone again.”

Advertisements

Still Life by Little Cub.  Vinyl LP, CD.

South London trio Little Cub will release their debut album “Still Life” on 28th April on Domino Records. Marrying a wry, worldly and subversive form of diarist lyricism with sumptuously evocative electronic production, Still Life announces the arrival of a band at once deeply in tune with the greatest traditions of progressive, homespun British pop music and at odds with the increasingly vacuous pop culture they are born into

Here’s a sombre reflection on life in 21st century England, with an equally dystopian music video to accompany. The band hail from south London, and their debut album, Still Life, drops at the end of this month on Domino Records.

Image result for real estate band

Real Estate have announced the release of new album In Mind coming out on the 17th of March via Domino. The news has been accompanied by the release of the new single and video ‘Darling’ which sees the band demonstrating their limited equestrianism skills and new line up including new guitarist Julian Lynch.

After a solo release from Martin Courtney and the departure of Matthew Mondanile, New Jersey indie rock treasures Real Estate have pulled together their fourth full-length, their first in 3 years.  Known for their sunny indie pop style, Real Estate make technical musicianship look easy.  From hazy 70s AM radio harmonies to jangly Byrds-era guitar tones, 2017 will see 11 new songs from the fellas,

The release with be the band’s first since the departure of Matt Mondanile last year to focus on his band Ducktails and Martin Courtney’s 2015 solo album Many Moons. The band have recently finished a short US tour but are expected to release new dates in support of the new album.

“Darling” from Real Estate’s album, In Mind, out March 17, 2017 on Domino Records.

Watch the new video for ‘Darling’ below:

Image may contain: text

White Lung Announce New LP Paradise, Share St. Vincent Q&A,

The first single from their second Domino release.

Canadian punk band White Lung have will release Paradise the follow-up to their excellent 2014 LP Deep Fantasy on May 6th via Domino Records. The announcement comes with a video for lead single ‘Hungry’, which features actress Amber Tambyln clinging to youth and beauty through a number of unconventional methods — like rubbing Bible pages on her face. The clip also features a cameo from Deafheaven lead singer George Clarke.

White Lung – Hungry (Official Video) Taken from the new album “Paradise”, coming May 6 on Domino.

The new album, Pond Scum (out today), is an integral piece in the evolution of Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s progressive and prolific catalogue. A collection of sessions recorded for John Peel’s influential BBC show, it spans eight years of Bonnie’s career and is essential for longtime fans and first-time listeners alike.

Bonnie 'Prince' Billy

Aaron Maine has been making gloriously affecting sad pop for a while now, with 2013’s Slow Dance In The Cosmos album a particular highpoint. Last year he announced his signing to Domino Records, alongside a superb new track called ‘Hour’, featuring his girlfriend and musical collaborator Frankie Cosmos. He’ll follow it up with a hotly-anticipated new album this year.

http://

Porches is the proliferation of Aaron Maine’s love affair with music. Never quite landing in any particular niche, Maine navigates through genres, learning, obsessing, and absorbing. Great victories and great defeats, cosmic or tangible, are the underlying elements that remain constant through his music.

It’s incredibly rare to find an album where you can say there’s not a bad song on it. Well, All We Are have accomplished this and made it sound effortless. The amalgamation of backgrounds and influences of the three musicians results in numerous highlights; the goose-bump-inducing sign off to Keep Me Alive, the slick bass riff on Utmost Good, and the simplistic beauty of Something About You which epitomised their set on the main stage at Liverpool Sound City are just a handful.

http://

 A sign of how remarkable the album is lies in the fact that we’re unable to put our finger on a favourite track – this prestigious title has changed hands at least half a dozen times. Single Honey is a pretty good starting point for newcomers but on an album rife with high points it’s best to digest it all in one hugely palatable portion.

http://

http://

When Matthew E White’s debut album, “Big Inner”, emerged unheralded in 2012, there was a sense of wonder that someone had emerged, seemingly fully musically formed, without anyone realising. But there was also a pleasing oddness about Big Inner: for all the obvious soul influences, the likes of Big Love and Brazos had a trancelike mood that was less Curtis Mayfield than Spiritualized. Its follow-up is a more straightforward affair, and – though still a delicious record – slightly less eye-opening. Memphis and Philly are the soul moods that dominate, and this time round White has added some singalong-ready choruses, notably on Feeling Good Is Good Enough: once someone starts rolling out the la-la-la-la-la codas, you suspect they’re picturing twilight festival crowds swaying in unison. There are depths, though: the emotional heart of the album, Tranquility, is a beautifully orchestrated meditation on the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman, with a feedback guitar solo that resolves into a loping groove, as if death is the peace that follows turmoil.

http://

You say you don’t like it, but I know you’re a liar/ ’Cause when we listen to this cover of the Bruce Springsteen song “Fire”  by Anna Calvi… fire the Calvi’s cover of the 1977 Boss track is the B-side to her new “Suddenly” 7-inch; “Suddenly” is also the first song on “One Breath”, her recent sophomore effort for Domino Reords. Feel the smoldering cover here,

 

http://

A 4cd or 4LP Anthology with original with rare and archival recordings and extensive liner notes from Robert Forster, Domino Records are honoured to announce the upcoming Autumn 2014 release of an extraordinary anthology for one of the most beloved and influential Australian groups of all-time, The Go-Betweens.

G Stands For Go-Betweens Volume One extensively documents the band’s origins in an ambitious box containing four vinyl albums, four compact discs and an extensive 112-page book, featuring a trove of archival photos and extensive historical liner notes from founding member Robert Forster, along with additional pieces from guest essayists, fans and contemporaries. The box set captures the band’s output from 1978 through 1984 and includes the first vinyl re-pressings of their first three studio albums in over thirty years (Send Me A Lullaby, Before Hollywood & Spring HillFair), all re-mastered from the original analog tapes. G Stands For Go-Betweens also brings together their early classic and collectible singles together on a fourth vinyl LP entitled The First Five Singles, featuring new artwork from its creators. Additionally, the set comes with four compact discs of rare, hard-to-find and unreleased demos, recordings, radio sessions and a complete live concert radio broadcast from 1982. If that’s not enough, the set comes with a silkscreen of their first promotional poster for their debut single, “Lee Remick”, as well as a reproduction of their very first press release from their own Able Label.

http://www.dominorecordsco/gobetweens/

The first three albums, the first five singles, outtakes, demos, radio sessions and a live show…

In the 1980s, Australia’s Go-Betweens were the dark horse among all those sharp-edged, sweet-and-sour guitar bands with literary pretensions. For those who found the cult of Morrissey too messianic and Lloyd Cole too self-satisfied, here was a connoisseurs’ choice: a band who name-checked Jean Genet while blending Sixties pop nous, 80s indie elegance, the brittle intensity of post-punk and the wayward non-conformity of The Modern Lovers.

A vehicle for the songs and voices of Robert Forster and Grant McLennan, the Go-Betweens formed in December 1977 in Brisbane and ended their first act in 1989. Six years into a fruitful post-Millennial reunion, they finally ceased trading in 2006 following McLennan’s sudden death from a heart attack. Forster has been plotting this gargantuan eight-disc slab of cultural excavation since shortly after that unhappy event; the first of three planned anthologies, it’s a beautifully conceived exploration of the band’s origins and early evolution.

Included are the first three Go-Betweens albums, Send Me A Lullaby (1982), Before Hollywood (1983), and Spring Hill Fair (1984), as well as all ten sides of their first five 45s, collected here on a new stand-alone LP titled The First Five Singles. Running parallel to these four vinyl albums are four CDs, arranged chronologically, consisting of outtakes, hard-to-find and unreleased demos, radio sessions and a complete (and excellent) live concert, recorded at the Mosman Hotel, Sydney, on April 23rd, 1982. There are over 100 tracks in all.

Meeting as fellow arts students at the University of Queensland, Forster and McLennan named their band after L.P. Hartley’s 1953 novel, and throughout its lifespan the group’s music was characterised by a darting intellectual curiosity. Debut single “Lee Remick” is a faux-naif piece of fan mail directed at the actress (“She was in The Omen / with Gregory Peck / She got killed / what the heck”), but its dumbness is studied and self-aware; on the B-side, “Karen”, a song clearly in thrall to Patti Smith’s “Gloria”, they’re already name-checking Brecht, Joyce and Chandler.

By 1980, and third single “I Need Two Heads”, the music had started to catch up with the words. Released on Postcard Records following trips to London and Glasgow, the song is an assured blend of The Cure and The Gang Of Four, giving the Go-Betweens their first Top 10 indie hit in the UK. Orange Juice drummer Steven Daly guested on the track, but by the time they started recording Send Me A Lullaby Lindy Morrison had joined on drums. As a settled three piece, the Go-Betweens’ house sound began to emerge: brittle and sharp, with lots of air between Forster’s guitar, McLennan’s bass and Morrison’s idiosyncratic rhythm. “Careless” has the compulsive twitch of early Orange Juice, and the urgent jangle of “Hold Your Horses” has shades of REM’s Chronic Town, but any sweetness is balanced by a sour twist. The vivid psycho-sexual drama of “Eight Pictures” creeps and crawls, the waspish digs at some thespian love-rival (“Same publicity shots for six years”) barely lightening the mood, while “It Could Be Anyone” recalls the neurotic funk of Talking Heads.

Released the following year, Before Hollywood marks a leap forward in both composition and execution, excising any lingering hints of ramshackle amateurishness. Robert Vickers joined as bassist, McLennan moved to guitar, and piano became a more prominent texture, notably on the lovely “Dusty In Here”. The album includes the masterful “Cattle And Cane”, a taut, minimal, bittersweet reflection on McLennan’s Cairns childhood, written on Nick Cave’s guitar. A slightly reconfigured version of the song features on the fourth CD of rarities.

On Spring Hill Fair, the Go-Betweens’ sound shuffles towards something lusher, more pop-savvy. A serrated edge remains on “Five Words” and the lowering “River Of Money”, but by now the band were lining up against the great song stylists of the mid-80s. Washed with synthesisers, “Bachelor Kisses” is animated by the same restrained romanticism as Prefab Sprout’s “When Love Breaks Down” (if anything, the demo is even more swoonsome), while “Part Company” – from its quivering emotional urgency down to its intricate, concentric weave of bass, vocal and fluid guitar lines – is a kissing cousin to The Smiths’ “Reel Around The Fountain”.

Parts of Spring Hill Fair point towards the glossier, more measured elegance of the Go-Betweens next phase, bookended by 1986’s Liberty Belle And The Black Diamond Express and 1988’s 16 Lovers Lane. But that’s another story, for another anthology. For now, Volume One of G Stands For Go-Betweens is a giddy treat, marking the spot where the headlong rush of new beginnings meets the steadying hand of accomplishment.