Posts Tagged ‘Ba Da Bing Records’

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“I went to the moon, I saw your head up in the clouds, What could I do?” is such a great opening line from this swoon-worthy NYC trio. Back in January we had the pleasure of sharing the premiere of Wooing’s “In Colour” video, a song taken from their debut EP, Daydream Time Machinereissued at the start of the year via Ba Da Bing Records. The New York trio will bookend with 2018 with the release of The Clouds, a new 7″ due out next month on Kanine Records. The single’s a-side “Could Have Been” is another great psych pop song, led by Rachel Trachtenburg’s breathy vocals and visionary lyrics. Working itself into a claustrophobic space, Wooing dig into brightened pockets of layered melodies and dense textural effects that rest between haunting tension and soaring above the clouds. Trachtenburg sings “once I came back down to planet Earth” creating an inescapable feeling of an alien presence, and we’re ready for the invasion. Ultimately the song deals with relationships lost as we’re left with the repeated “you could have been dear to me.”

Wooing offer hauntingly beautiful vocals backed by echoing guitars: the urgency of underground 90s rock (i.e. Helium, Quasi) meets the psychedelic Syd Barrett sounds of the 60s.

From the forthcoming 7″ The Clouds on Kanine Records,

BAND.
Rachel Trachtenburg -Guitar & Vocals
Rosie Slater -Drums
JR Thomason -Guitar

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Over the course of the past six years, Omaha, NB musician David Nance has released three full-length albums for labels Grapefruit and Ba Da Bing Records, a 7-inch, numerous cassettes, CDRs and unlicensed “cover albums”. His latest full-length is credited to the David Nance Group and features Nance alongside his recent hot-shit live band of fellow Omaha musicians. “Peaced and Slightly Pulverized’s” sounds are alternatingly tender and brusque.

The anthemic Poison with its fuzzed-out guitar riff that leans into a Crazy-Horsian guitar maelstrom and white-hot solo, to Ham Sandwich; a blisteringly frantic rant about a lunchtime torment – uncomfortable in its directness. Side one closes with the epic seven and a half minute Amethyst; an emotional odyssey with Nance and Schroeder strangling their guitars into a twin-guitar, barbed-wire duel. The album’s centerpiece is In Her Kingdom, an emotive ballad that fades into view with a plaintive guitar strum that ebbs and flows with a ris ing tide of swelling guitars, it’s riffs gilding the melody and adding flecks of gold to Nance’s tale of poverty and grace. The album closes with Prophet’s Profit’s biting commentary on false idolatry utilizing the group’s not-so-secret weaponry of Nance and Schroeder’s six-string simpatico to bring the listener home.

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Arc Iris releases Icon Of Ego, its third groundbreaking album, as a trio that packs the heft of a far bigger band with fully realized sonic and visual intensity. On this latest album, vocalist / guitarist Jocie Adams, keyboardist / sample artist Zach Tenorio-Miller and drummer Ray Belli have crafted a vividly expressionistic new album that reflects both the group’s protean talents as well as its journey of survival. After its self-named 2014 debut on the nti- label, Arc Iris achieved critical acclaim, along with tours with St. Vincent and Jeff Tweedy and festivals like Bonnaroo followed. Within two years, the band self-released Moon Saloon in the US while Bella Union released the album in Europe. Tours supporting Kimbra, Gene Ween, and a complete re-imagination of Joni
Mitchell’s Blue performed at Washington’s Kennedy Center followed, which added to a growing, international fan base that has remained dedicated throughout.Icon of Ego finds a stronger, more experienced band. Recording at Providence’s Columbus Theater, home to silent movies and vaudeville during the ’20s, the band has evolved into a concentrated pop-prog explosion, mixing styles with disparate elements that captivate and surprise. With heavy synthesizer work by Tenorio and Adams, and seemingly impossible transitions executed effortlessly by Belli, the songs here carry a thick, analog electronic sound that harks back to the ’70s. Presiding over these are Adams’ powerful vocals that house the energy under pop forms.

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Released October 12th, 2018

Jocie Adams – vocals, electric guitar, keyboards
Zach Tenorio-Miller – vocals, keyboards, samples
Ray Belli – drums
featuring:
Anna Williams – violin
Misha Veselov – cello

All songs by Arc iris 

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Four years ago, Jocie Adams of The Low Anthem, stepped aside from the Rhode Island band she was a member of to begin the next evolution in her musical career as lead singer for Arc Iris. This Friday, Arc Iris will release its third album, Icon Of Ego, via Ba Da Bing Records. On it, Adams collaborates with her band mates — keyboardist/sample artist Zach Tenorio-Miller and drummer Ray Belli — on a collection of songs that bridge avant-pop with her folksy, musical roots.

“If You Can See” from the forthcoming album. Lovingly made while walking around downtown Providence, R.I., the song is ebullient and optimistic, an “up with people” anthem we all could use in these divisive times, regardless of the side you’re on.

The first thing you see in the video are faces, lots of them. Most are smiling. There are old folks and young folk, and people of all colors. These are everyday people, moving along to the song, all mouthing small phrases of it as Adams sings

The video culminates with everyone singing repeatedly in unison “we can work together” that results in a boost of emotional inspiration.

‘If You Can See’ is a reminder that the world is giving us gifts of support and love from many places all of the time,” Adams says via email. “We need to remember and acknowledge the good as well as the bad in order to maintain our positivity, which is needed to create change. If we all consider our grumpy egos to be justified by our ideas of a dystopian present and future, there is no motivation to be conscientious. Here we offer a ‘keep your chin up’ song for everyone. Life is hard.

Icon Of Ego is out Oct. 12 via Ba Da Bing Records.

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Slothrust band leader Leah Wellbaum and drummer/singer Mickey Vershbow met while both
immersed in the Boston music scene & then went on to pursue separate musical careers on opposite coasts. ANMLPLNET displays their magnetic musical bond, even while withstanding the physical distance andtheir hectic schedules. 

Nobody is more surprised about having created a full ANMLPLNET album than the group itself: Slothrust leader Leah Wellbaum along with drummer/singer Mickey Vershbow. The project and debut LP truly displays their magnetic musical bond, even while withstanding physical distance and hectic schedules. The band was formed originally on four disparate rules:

1. Always drink absinthe while rehearsing.
2. Write lyrics that are antonymic translations, meaning nouns,
adjectives and verbs were replaced with their antonyms.
3. Play songs straight through as one giant piece, no breaks.
4. Accept mostly unusual gigs, like their performances at a Dorchester
rave and in a wooden shack on the tiny Star Island off New Hampshire.

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Yeah, sure, so many bands have used these same precepts for vast success, so what? Even while seeking to create a dream-like soundscape, ANMLPLNET is surprisingly gimmick-free music being, both epochal in scope and surprisingly melodic. Their goal is to explore the space between songwriting and improvisation, and the result is an uncontrived melding of their personal styles and technical mastery of their instruments. Wellbaum and Vershbow basically plan, dig, then embark on a fresh road towards rock brilliance. Fall Asleep is their debut album and the first 500 copies are pressed on unique gold marble vinyl.

released April 20, 2018 on Ba Da Bing Records.

The Clean member Hamish Kilgour’s second-ever solo album, Finklestein, flips the singer/guitarist/drummer’s path taken on All Of It And Nothing. Having previously gone for intimate, minimalistic performances, Finklestein displays a chock-full production quality akin to a fairytale. It’s a fitting change, seeing as the songs are based around a children’s story Kilgour conceived for his son about a kingdom that invents a way of dealing with their depleting gold resources. The songs include organ, saxophone, pedal steel, piano, vibraphone, harmonica, even footsteps (Hamish is renowned for his stepping), most of it performed by Kilgour and his producer/collaborator Gary Olsen at Olsen’s studio, Marlborough Farms in Brooklyn. Originally conceived as being a children’s book as well as album, Finklestein rides roughshod through this fairytale world with grace.

Finklestein took a year to record, as Hamish’s involvement with a large part of the Brooklyn music scene, as well as dates with recent New Zealand Music Hall of Fame inductees The Clean, split his time. His songs benefit from this elongated recording period, as each track creates its own space within the Finklestein world, mixing instruments and melodies in a rainbow of ways. Yet it’s Kilgour’s songwriting sensibilities that hold the album together, his charismatic and loose arrangements within a congenial environment of musical play.

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For those early birds who love their Hamish, there’s a Finklestein Special Edition, which includes Funklestein, an entire second LP of music created to complement it’s cohort release. This bonus LP, limited to 50 copiesand vinyl only, provides two psychedelirious side long tracks (Side A: “Reaction” & Side B: “Action”) using the same musicians and studio as Finklestein proper.

Hamish Kilgour’s new album “Finklestein” out June 22nd on Ba Da Bing Records

Katie Von Schleicher is following up her excellent 2017 debut, Shitty Hits, with a 7″ vinyl for Record Store Day. The 7″ will be entitled  “Glad To Be Here/Party Dawn” and released on May 4th via the fine folks at Ba Da Bing.

“On a break from touring this winter I went alone to Maryland, where I am originally from, and made these two songs, taking the gear I’ve very happily accrued since making my album Shitty Hits. I built a fire, I set up my gold drum kit, I saw a ton of stars and felt smushed by silence, and it was lonely, so I made these songs. ‘Glad to Be Here’ is where I find myself right now. ‘Party Dawn’ is tied to Maryland, to my friend and our adolescence. Both are a bridge toward the subject matter of my next record. Back in New York, my collaborator Adam Brisbin (Sam Evian, Jolie Holland, Buck Meek) contributed guitar and bass, and Julian Fader (Ava Luna, Frankie Cosmos, Nadine, Palehound) mixed it.”

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Shitty Hits’, the debut album from Brooklyn-based songwriter Katie von Schleicher wasn’t just a brilliant title, but a great record.

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Don’t let the name of Katie Von Schleicher’s newest album, “Shitty Hits”, put you off—the songs it contains are neither. Her music—a darker take on Americana that calls to mind Lee Hazlewood and Mazzy Star—should be hits in another world’s Top 40, no question, but they’re definitely not crap.

Range is key throughout Shitty Hits. One of the album’s quietest songs, “Mary,” is nestled at the heart of the album, and is immediately followed up with the big, easy-going swagger of “Life’s A Lie.” Other songs carefully invert expectations: “Paranoia” starts with bass and vocals only, suggesting a bleaker approach, but then shifts into a lovely, downright uplifting full arrangement and chorus before concluding with a big—but not ham-fisted ending. That makes the slow doom grind of “Nothing” hit harder, with growling tones underscoring its final two minutes, like a threat.

If the album has a standout track, it’s “Soon,” an intimate performance which showcases Von Schleicher’s precise creative control. You can hear that focus in the way gentle drum taps cut through the arrangement, the way the keyboards and guitars complement and echo each other, the way saxophone carefully emerges towards the end, and the way that ending is sudden, but not abrupt. It’s the work of someone who knows exactly what she wants, and has the vision and skill to realize it.

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17035_030_034_Lo res credit Chris Baker

Signed to Full Time Hobby , Katie Von Schleicher is to release her follow-up to a demo tape made for her label Ba Da Bing Records boss whilst working as a intern, her debut full-length album, Shitty Hits. With a sound that takes in everything from the expansive country soul perfected by Natalie Prass to the melancholic sway of Andy Shauf, Katie seems to have emerged a master of more styles than most people ever even try.

Discussing the inspiration behind the record, Katie has suggested it’s a record not inspired by grand themes or great achievements, but about mediocrity, and the entirely human quality of being deeply flawed. The impressively full-bodied production belies the fact the whole thing was created on a tape machine in Katie’s childhood bedroom at her parents’ house in Maryland. Whilst Katie Von Schleicher’s career path is already a remarkable success story, with a record this good,

from the album ‘Shitty Hits’ – out 7/28 via Ba Da Bing Records & Full Time Hobby (UK/EU)

Claire Cronin Athens, GA

Came Down a Storm is an album that creates a world. Through Claire Cronin’s deep, intimate voice come songs of wreckage and redemption. A published poet and English Ph.D. student as well as a musician, Cronin uses images and symbols to craft songs that reach beyond the personal.

Death comes in unexpected ways, and for some it does not come at all when it could. While very much an album about death, ‘Came Down A Storm’ is, thanks mainly to Cronin’s deeply affecting voice, a defiant celebration of life. A collaboration between Cronin and Deerhoof guitarist John Dieterich, it is a collection of dark folkish songs whose simplicity recalls a harsher, yet less complicated time. Dieterich’s atmospheric, turbulent guitar and sampled sounds is matched by Cronin’s poetic tales of ghostly misadventure and redemption, shared with us by crackling twilight campfire, with a voice that was intended for such a purpose. What is remarkable here is that Cronin somehow connects us to something beyond the music itself, to a rhythm that beats in the background our whole lives, but one which we only really hear in the stillness of our most authentic moments, in grief or humility. Like the handed down music of the first pioneers or settlers in a strange new land, the songs are implicitly traditional but describe an altogether different, alien world. Magical and terrifying listen.

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