Posts Tagged ‘Cover’

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There are some bands that you really should just never try to cover. Cocteau Twins is one such band and tackling “Cherry Coloured Funk” seems like a dangerous move for an up and coming band. That said, Arctic Lake hit a home run with this beautiful rendition. They stay true to the overall sound and Liz Fraser’s vocal style, but there are enough twists to make it their own. I’m especially in love with the last part of the song where the music intensifies, Sigur Ros style.

We’re so happy to be a part of the music for ‘Back to Life’, working alongside Solomon Grey with Clyma – it’s being aired on BBC1 and available to stream via the BBC iplayer.

Artic Lake“Cherry-Coloured Funk “ (Cocteau Twins Cover). Taken from the Soundtrack to BBC’s ‘Back To Life’

J Mascis Covers Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers' 'Don't Do Me Like That'

US indie guitar hero J Mascis (Dinosaur Jr) has unleashed a incendiary cover of legendary classic hits mainstays Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers‘ awesome rocking hit ‘Don’t Do Me Like That‘. The oft-languid Mascis summons hidden energy reserves for his fiery yet soulful rendition, conjuring majestic guitar solos and crunchy riffage like the axe-wielding wizard he is. The standalone release follows Mascis‘ 2018 solo album “Elastic Days” and drops in advance of a heady tour season for the artist, who’s gearing up for shows in Japan, the UK and Europe. Dive into his reimagining cover of ‘Don’t Do Me Like That’

J Mascis covers Tom Petty’s “Don’t Do Me Like That”

Kevin Devine will transform into Kenny O’Brien and The O’Douls for a St. Patrick’s Day celebration in the Boston-area and NYC . He’ll be playing at Great Scott in Allston, and early and late shows and at Mercury Lounge in NYC, and in his words: “It’s gonna be a party, essentially, the kind of punk, uptempo side of what I do with some Celtic instrumentation.” To get a taste of what it might be like, Kevin’s got a newly-recorded cover of The Pogues“The Body of An American,” It’s a pretty faithful take on the original, but it also has that unmistakable Kevin Devine touch, and it’s good stuff.

Kevin also put together a (pretty funny) video of himself explaining the reasoning behind the name “Kenny O’Brien and The O’Douls” and what these shows will be all about. He also includes a story about a St. Patrick’s Day 14-hour alcoholic blackout at SXSW.

To get a sense of what we’re doing, head over to BrooklynVegan (who’ll be presenting the shows), enjoy our cover of The Pogues’ “The Body of An American” & get some more info on the project & the weekend:

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Released December 13th, 2018

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To many, Lady Lamb the Beekeeper (aka Aly Spaltro) is an enigma. Her songs are at once intimate and unbridled- both deeply personal and existentially contemplative. Spaltro is a fearless performer who can command a pitch-black stage with nothing more than her voice. Yet, when the band bursts in and the lights come up, what began as a demonstration of restraint shifts seamlessly into an emphatic snarl.

It was in Spaltro’s home state of Maine that she first found her voice among thousands of films in the independent rental store where she worked the closing shift. After hours, Spaltro would create songs completely uninhibited by musical conventions, learning to play and sing as she hit record.

10 Years of Mom + Pop: CoversLady Lamb“Come Save Me” (Jagwar Ma Cover).

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We took one of our fave songs and an indie classic, Beirut’s ‘Nantes’, and tried to make the song our own for Covers Inc. Huge thanks to Mahogany for having us – we loved recording this.

Band Members
Sebastian Fox ‘Bassi’,
Stevie Red McMinn,
Al Mitchell,

COVERS brings together Classic Songs and amazing New Artists against a bold silhouetted backdrop. Available on YouTube, Spotify and Apple Music.

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Manchester Orchestra and Julien Baker cover Pedro The Lion’s “Bad Things To Such Good People” Recorded in Manchester Orchestra’s studio outside Atlanta, GA — and produced by Andy Hull, bandmate/co-writer Robert McDowell, and Julien Baker.

Hull details the cover’s origin: “This song has held a deep weight with me since I was 16, and my awe of Bazan’s songwriting has never died down. It does what so few others can accomplish by painting a detailed and powerful world with minimal words, and allowing the listener to do the rest of the work. And working with Julien was an incredible experience…After meeting digitally and discussing how we could collaborate, we knew we had to do a Pedro song, and it suddenly clicked when she suggested this one. We met in person for the first time about 30 minutes before we started sketching out our re-creation. It didn’t take me but about five minutes to realize just how deeply talented and layered Julien is. I’ve called her ‘the truth’ ever since our first sessions and look forward to working with her as much as we can in the future.”

Net proceeds from sales and streaming will be donated to1 Million 4 Anna, a Foundation dedicated to Anna Basso with the mission to eradicate Ewing sarcoma. The Foundation’s main initiative is to fund promising Ewing sarcoma research, and also provides college scholarships for survivors as well as support to families with a family member receiving treatment.

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Aside from a pit-stop at Desert Daze Festival (at 5AM as the sun arose, no less!)
Wand‘s forthcoming European tour is THE most Wand-ificent event remaining in 2018! Beginning in early November, Wand kick it off in Bristol and continue the journey throughout the UK and beyond. Not a road less traveled for the seasoned band, but every performance in towns new and old blossom into trans-formative experiences!

To celebrate such an occasion, Wand have dropped a terrific cover of Brian Eno’s “Here Come The Warm Jets”! The band says: “This tune has been a favorite live cover over the years, the way it tumbles after a distant horizon. This scrappy live version is a little lit match we rescued off the cutting room floor at Bauer Mansion, and dates back to early 2015. We’re sharing it as a banner of some flailing joy we’ll be flying on this final leg of our ‘Perfume’ tour.”

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With such a constant evolution of material, any attendee will be transported into one of Wand’s many worlds. With a roadmap like that leading the way, how could you ever go wrong? Prep yourself by having a listen to “Here Come The Warm Jets”, then hurry and grab your tickets–they won’t be Wand-ering around forever!

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Twenty years after the Beastie Boys first said “Hello Nasty” to the world, D.A. Stern and Jacuzzi Boys are teaming up to celebrate its birthday in the form of a split 7” of covers brought to you by Slumberland Records. Focusing on two fan-favorite deep cuts, the three JBs and one D.A. chose songs that showcase the Beasties’ unique versatility while offering messages of mindfulness, emblematic of their later career.

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“Song For the Man,” a Horovitz-penned feminist anthem originally steeped in Sixties psychedelia now sees a garage treatment that only Jacuzzi Boys could deliver while “I Don’t Know,” once an Adam Yauch bossa nova standout, gets the D.A. Stern treatment replete with jangly guitars and sun-drenched backing vocals supplied by Felicia Douglass (Dirty Projectors, Ava Luna). The Beasties were about a lot more than just fighting for your right to party, and this great single is a fitting tribute to their depth in miniature form.

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Released by: Slumberland Records Release date:3 August 2018

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Phoebe Bridgers gave indie rock a shot in the arm last year with the wonderful “Stranger In The Alps”, the Los Angeles musician’s debut album – she became one of our favorite artists of 2017, and her song “Funeral” was among our most played tracks of the year’s roundup. Today, she’s back with a beautiful cover of “The Gold” by Manchester Orchestra, and contrary to the title, the Elliott Smith-harkening song is about a relationship that’s lost its lustre

Phoebe’s cover of Manchester Orchestra‘s “The Gold,” the excellent single from last year’s A Black Mile to the Surface. Phoebe doesn’t change the song up too drastically, but she performs it in that same intimate, instantly-gripping way that she performs her own music, and really makes the song sound like one of her own (as she has done with other covers, like the Mark Kozelek song she did for her great 2017 album Stranger in the Alps.

Manchester Orchestra“The Gold (Phoebe Bridgers Version),” out now on Dead Oceans Records.

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Florence and the Machine pay tribute to Fleetwood Mac, a crucial influence for her with a stripped-down cover of “Silver Springs” that was recorded during a special radio session for The Spectrum at the SiriusXM Studios.

Singer Florence Welch commands the track with her fluttering vibrato, occasionally adopting a light twang as she channels Stevie Nicks. The arrangement opens with subtle piano and acoustic guitar, building with layered backing vocals and a faint tambourine.

Welch spoke about Nicks as a creative inspiration “I’m pretty obsessed with Stevie Nicks, from her style to her voice,” she said. “I like watching her on YouTube and her old performances, the way she moves and everything.”

Florence Welch is in a totally new headspace for new album High as Hope, the follow up to Florence + The Machine‘s chart-topping How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful.

During the SiriusXM session, Florence and the Machine also performed three original tracks: 2009’s “Cosmic Love” and recent singles “Hunger” and “Sky Full of Song,” both from the band’s fourth studio album, High as Hope. 

Speaking to Jenny Eliscu ahead of her exclusive SiriusXM performance, Welch acknowledged that her life and the way she views the world has changed since her last record. This led to her single Hunger becoming a celebratory song about the human condition rather than something dark and dramatic. Along the way, she also learned that freedom can come from being disciplined and isn’t just a “let loose, smash everything to bits kind of thing.”

Florence + The Machine performs “Hunger” at SiriusXM Studios in New York City.

Elsewhere in the interview, she discussed the origins of the album title High as Hope, saying that it came out of a poem she wrote about New York, and she also clarified why her recent breakup wasn’t a focal point of the album.

“I didn’t feel like people needed to hear that any more, and I think, at that point, there were bigger heartbreaks going on than my own heartbreak,” she told Eliscu. “It somehow didn’t feel like that interesting to me. And maybe ‘How Big, How Blue’ had covered every nook and cranny of heartbreak that you possibly could. And also, I guess, in the journey that I had in the last couple of years, I understood that it wasn’t really about the other person, you know?”

Florence and the Machine, opened for the Rolling Stones in April,