Posts Tagged ‘Tom Petty’

Tom Petty released “Somewhere Under Heaven,” co-written with Mike Campbell for 1994’s Wildflowers but left unheard until now. The track, available for purchase now through digital retailers, which will be part of a new archival project titled Wildflowers: All the Rest.

Even a brief listen to “Somewhere Under Heaven” places it firmly in context with the original album’s layered complexity. You can hear a sample of the new song above. The three-times platinum Wildflowers, a No. 8 hit that marked the first of three Petty albums co-produced by Rick Rubin, moved with deceptive grace from brawny rockers (“You Wreck Me,” “Cabin Down Below,” “Honey Bee”) to acoustic fragility (the title track, “Time to Move On”) to moving longform narratives (“It’s Good to be King,” “Crawling Back to You”).

And apparently there was much more where that came from. The release of Wildflowers: All the Rest, which features songs written between 1992-94, apparently corrects a wrong that goes back more than two decades. Petty says Wildflowers was originally intended to be a double album.

“Somewhere Under Heaven” can also be heard during the closing credits for the movie Entourage, which opens this week. Petty’s  last studio album, Hypnotic Eye, became his first-ever U.S. No. 1. It was also his highest-charting U.K. release since Wildflowers went Top 10 20 years ago..

The track was recorded for 1994’s Wildflowers, which will see a second disc from those sessions called Wallflowers: All the Rest hit shelves at some point in the future. But Petty was quick to point out that these aren’t outtakes.

“The original plan was to release it as as the complete Wildflowers album with the original album and this,” he said. “And Warner Bros. came back to us and said, ‘Look, this is far too good a record to just send straight to the catalog racks. We’re going to put it out as its own album.’ I was behind that decision too. It’s done and we’re eventually going to put it out. It’s just sitting there finished,

Several of The Best of Everything’s 38 songs, including “You Don’t Know How It Feels,” are plucked from Petty’s beloved solo album Wildflowers, which was released on this day in 1994. To commemorate Wildflowers’ 24th anniversary,

While there’s no word on the long-promised expanded edition of Tom Petty’s 1994 album Wildflowers, we have some new insight of the sessions courtesy of its producer, Rick Rubin. In a new interview, he discussed the recording of the tracks and how Petty was “haunted” by its legacy.

As Rubin told Malcolm Gladwell on their Broken Record podcast (embedded below), the genesis for Wildflowers came from the sessions that resulted in the bonus tracks for the Heartbreakers‘ 1993 compilation, “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and the cover of Thunderclap Newman’s “Something in the Air.” After the meticulous work they did with Jeff Lynne, Rubin freed them in the studio, and it resulted in what Rubin called a more “organic” sound, that “felt more alive and more human,” and they decided to continue working together.

It was a particularly “fertile” and “prolific” period in Petty’s career, as Rubin noted. Plus, Petty was eager to please his new producer and open to suggestions. “Hope You Never,” one of the leftovers that wound up on the She’s the One soundtrack, was a particular example.

“We did that very in a straightforward way, kind of almost Jeff Lynne-y drumwise,” he said. “Very straight. And we probably played that a bunch of different ways before we decided, ‘Oh, we like it this way.’ [We] probably played it more like band-style and then it’s like, ‘This lends itself more to the kind of hypnotic, locked-in sound.’ It’s a more down-tempo, moody piece, sort of the sarcastic Tom — ‘I hope you never fall in love with somebody like you.'”

Rubin said that they recorded “between 26 and 28 songs,” but Warner Bros. felt a single LP would have greater commercial potential. Petty, who repeatedly fought with his former label MCA, agreed with his new bosses and they went about figuring out which songs to include and in what order. Wildflowers was eventually released in November 1994 with 15 tracks. But Petty always hoped to put out the others.

“He thought it was really important because the legacy of the Wildflowers album loomed large in his career,” Rubin continued. “And he knew that the second half of Wildflowers was an important statement. His issue was [that] he didn’t want to put it out as a new Tom Petty album, ’cause it’s not a new Tom Petty album — it was recorded 25 years ago — and he didn’t want to release it as an old catalog album because he thought it deserved more than being a catalog album. He felt like it was too good to just put out and was sort of looking for the right story where it would have the exposure that it deserved. And he never came up with it.”

About two and a half years ago, Petty went to Rubin’s house and played the unreleased tracks, which he had since made a few changes to, for Rubin, and the quality “floored” him. “I had, like, a vague memory of them,” he said, “but some of them just hit me like, ‘Wow, what a great song! How did we ever miss this?'”

But during that listening session, Petty opened up about how he knew they had channeled something magical on those tapes, and could never get it back.

“He told me Wildflowers scares him, because he’s not really sure why it’s as good as it is,” Rubin said. “So it has this, like, haunted feeling for him. … He loves it, but it’s not like he can turn that on again. He couldn’t make Wildflowers 2 today. That was the point. The point was, ‘I can’t do this now. This was then, and it was where I was then and it was a prolific period. This is an extension of that moment.'”

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She's the One

When asked for a song to include in writer-director Edward Burns‘ romantic comedy She’s The One,  Tom Petty responded with an entire album. Though nominally a film soundtrack, the Warner Bros. collection stands proudly with the singer-songwriter’s best work of the 1990s. Cut with producer Rick Rubin and the ever-reliable Heartbreakers, Songs and music from “SHE’S THE ONE” has a relaxed feel and eclectic mix of material (including Beck and Lucinda Williams covers) that give the impression Petty was really enjoying himself. Which doesn’t mean his customary craftsmanship is absent; the dozen originals include such terrific songs as “Climb That Hill” and single “Walls (Circus),” which features guest vocals from Lindsey Buckingham. Released in 1996, SHE’S THE ONE is an album sometimes forgotten but well worth rediscovering.

The album was not mentioned on the four-hour documentary Runnin’ Down a Dream, though Petty could be seen doing a studio session of the song “Angel Dream (No. 4)”.

Some songs were originally recorded for Wildflowers and were put on this album to fill it out. When In April 2015, when Tom Petty’s back catalog was released in High-resolution audio, this was one of only two albums not included in the series (the other being Wildflowers).

There are two songs on the disc that Petty chose to record and release in two different versions. The first is Walls which kicks off the album with its Beatles- and Byrds-inspired psychedelic version, aptly titled Walls (Circus). The version appearing later in the disc is more barren and Dylan-esque in nature. The second song to appear twice is Angel Dream. Both versions borrow a page from the Simon and Garfunkel book. The first to appear is more like the Bridge over Troubled Water era, while the later version borrows from the Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M. era. One of my favorites on this disc is Hung Up and Overdue which borrows heavily from The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds album.

Most notable on this disc is Petty’s merging into a pattern similar to Neil Young’s. His Heartbreakers are like Young’s Crazy Horse, and his sound blends from solitary acoustic music to all-out feedback-laden rockers. It certainly keeps things fresh with the stark contrast between the styles and seems to fit Petty as well as it fits Young.

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American Treasure, is a 60-track box set featuring previously unreleased live and studio material from Tom Petty, will be released on September. 28th. The songs on the collection are reportedly drawn from all phases of Petty’s career with his longtime band the Heartbreakers.

Full details including a complete track list are expected to be announced soon. The news was revealed today on Petty’s SiriusXM radio station, along with the debut of the first track from the box set, 1982’s previously unreleased “Keep a Little Soul.” American Treasure was reportedly compiled by Petty’s daughter Adria, his wife Dana, Heartbreakers guitarist and keyboardist Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench and “studio collaborator” Ryan Ulate.

After the countdown clock emerged this morning, many fans speculated that the news would be concerning the release of a double album version of Petty’s 1994 record Wildflowers. He had originally intended for the album, his second solo effort, to be a double album, but, at Warner Bros. request, he scaled it back to a single disc.

In 2014, it was reported that a set expected to be called Wildflowers: All the Rest, that restored the complete track list, was in the works to coincide with the album’s 20th anniversary. Only the song “Somewhere Under Heaven” has officially surfaced, appearing during the closing credits of the Entourage movie.

He was planning to support the release with a unique tour. “I want to take the Heartbreakers and whoever else I need to reproduce every sound in a big way,” he had said. “That album was really about sound in a big way. I would like to go out there and perform the entire album as it was originally conceived with all of the songs.”

“That would have been smaller-scale, away from the hits,” guitarist Mike Campbell later added. But he said that the plan, to which Norah Jones had signed on, was scrapped in favor of a career-spanning trek to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Heartbreakers. Unfortunately, Petty died a week after the last date of the tour, a September. 25th show at the Hollywood Bowl.

Tom Petty‘s family and former collaborators compiled the four-CD box set of previously unreleased material by Petty and the Heartbreakers, for release on September 28th, SiriusXM announced. The release, called An American Treasure, marks the first posthumous album of Petty material since his death in October. The SiriusXM broadcast debuted a clip from one of the unreleased songs from 1982 called “Keep a Little Soul.”

An American Treasurewill contain previously unreleased studio recordings, live recordings, deep cuts and alternate versions of popular Petty songs,. The collection will encompass 60 tracks in total. A less expensive two-CD set will also be available for purchase.

Petty was as prolific as he was talented. During the Eighties and Nineties, he released albums at a rapid pace. His studio productivity dipped slightly in the new millennium, when he put out an album roughly every four years. The last album Petty released under his own name was 2014’s Hypnotic Eye. He also contributed to 2016’s Mudcrutch 2 with members of his pre-Heartbreakers band.

TomPetty - An American Treasure D2C pack shot Image

Petty was found unconscious at his home in Malibu on October 2nd, 2017. He was taken to the hospital and put temporarily on life support. He died hours later.

In January, a medical examiner ruled that the singer died of an accidental overdose. Petty had been prescribed drugs to treat emphysema, knee issues and a fractured hip, according to a statement from his family. “On the day he died, he was informed his hip had graduated to a full-on break,” Dana and Adria wrote. “It is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his overuse of medication.”

After we lost the iconic rocker Tom Petty. The 66-year-old died of cardiac arrest. In his memory, a new tribute collection called “An American Treasure” features previously unheard recording and live performances. Anthony Mason spoke to Petty’s daughter, Adria, in her first TV interview since her father’s death.

1              Surrender           Previously unreleased track from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers sessions-1976
2              Listen To Her Heart         Live at Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA-November 11, 1977
3              Anything That’s Rock ‘N’ Roll      Live at Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA-November 11, 1977
4              When The Time ComesAlbum track from You’re Gonna Get It!-May 2, 1978
5              You’re Gonna Get It       Alternate version featuring strings from You’re Gonna Get It! sessions-1978
6              Radio Promotion Spot    1977
7              Rockin’ Around (With You)          Album track from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers -November 9, 1976
8              Fooled Again (I Don’t Like It)       Alternate version from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers-1976
9              Breakdown         Live at Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA-November 11, 1977
10           The Wild One, Forever  Album track from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers-November 9, 1976
11           No Second Thoughts      Album track from You’re Gonna Get It!-May 2, 1978
12           Here Comes My Girl       Alternate version from Damn The Torpedoes sessions-1979
13           What Are You Doing In My Life  Alternate version from Damn The Torpedoes sessions-1979
14           Louisiana Rain    Alternate version from Damn The Torpedoes sessions-1979
15           Lost In Your Eyes              Previously unreleased single from Mudcrutch sessions-1974
CD 2
1              Keep A Little Soul             Previously unreleased track from Long After Dark sessions-1982
2              Even The Losers               Live at Rochester Community War Memorial, Rochester, NY-1989
3              Keeping Me Alive            Previously unreleased track from Long After Dark sessions-1982
4              Don’t Treat Me Like A Stranger  B-side to UK single of “I Won’t Back Down”-April, 1989
5              The Apartment Song      Demo recording (with Stevie Nicks)-1984
6              Concert Intro     Live introduction by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
7              King’s Road         Live at The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
8              Clear The Aisles                Live concert announcement by Tom Petty, The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
9              A Woman In Love (It’s Not Me)Live at The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
10           Straight Into Darkness   Alternate version from The Record Plant, Hollywood, CA-May 5, 1982
11           You Can Still Change Your MindAlbum track from Hard Promises-May 5, 1981
12           Rebels  Alternate version from Southern Accents sessions-1985
13           Deliver Me          Alternate version from Long After Dark sessions-1982
14           Alright For Now                Album track from Full Moon Fever-April 24, 1989
15           The Damage You’ve Done            Alternate version from Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) sessions-1987
16           The Best Of Everything  Alternate version from Southern Accents sessions-March 26, 1985
17           Walkin’ From The Fire    Previously unreleased track from Southern Accents sessions-March 1, 1984
18           King Of The Hill  Early take (with Roger McGuinn)-November 23, 1987
CD 3
1              I Won’t Back Down          Live at The Fillmore, San Francisco, CA-February 4, 1997
2              Gainesville          Previously unreleased track from Echo sessions-February 12, 1998
3              You And I Will Meet Again            Album track from Into The Great Wide Open-July 2, 1991
4              Into The Great Wide Open          Live at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Arena-November 24, 1991
5              Two Gunslingers              Live at The Beacon Theatre, New York, NY-May 25, 2013
6              Lonesome Dave               Previously unreleased track from Wildflowers sessions-July 23, 1993
7              To Find A Friend               Album track from Wildflowers-November 1, 1994
8              Crawling Back To You      Album track from Wildflowers-November 1, 1994
9              Wake Up Time  Previously unreleased track from early Wildflowers sessions-August 12, 1992
10           Grew Up Fast    Album track from Songs and Music from “She’s the One”-August 6, 1996
11           I Don’t Belong   Previously unreleased track from Echo sessions-December 3, 1998
12           Accused Of Love              Album track from Echo-April 13, 1999
13           Lonesome Sundown      Album track from Echo-April 13, 1999
14           Don’t Fade On Me           Previously unreleased track from Wildflowers-sessions-April 20, 1994
CD 4
1              You And Me       Clubhouse version-November 9, 2007
2              Have Love Will Travel     Album track from The Last DJ-October 8, 2002
3              Money Becomes King    Album track from The Last DJ-October 8, 2002
4              Bus To Tampa Bay            Previously unreleased track from Hypnotic Eye sessions-August 11, 2011
5              Saving Grace      Live at Malibu Performing Arts Center, Malibu, CA-June 16, 2006
6              Down South       Album track from Highway Companion-July 25, 2006
7              Southern Accents            Live at Stephen C. O’Connell Center, Gainesville, FL-September 21, 2006
8              Insider  Live (with Stevie Nicks) at O’Connell Center, Gainesville, FL-September 21, 2006
9              Two Men Talking              Previously unreleased track from Hypnotic Eye sessions-November 16, 2012
10           Fault Lines           Album track from Hypnotic Eye-July 29, 2014
11           Sins Of My Youth             Early take from Hypnotic Eye sessions-November 12, 2012
12           Good Enough    Alternate version from Mojo sessions-2012
13           Something Good Coming             Album track from Mojo-July 15, 2010
14           Save Your Water              Album track from Mudcrutch 2-May 20, 2016
15           Like A DiamondAlternate version from The Last DJ sessions-2002
16           Hungry No More              Live at House of Blues, Boston, MA-June 15, 2016

Chris Martin of Coldplay

An outpouring of grief swept the music industry at the passing of Tom Petty , as it was confirmed that Tom Petty died from a cardiac arrest at the age of 66.

The emoting continued at the Moda Center in Portland, Ore., as Coldplay held a minute of silence for the passing of a rock ‘n’ roll legend. They followed the silence with a cover of “Free Fallin’” as they were joined by Peter Buck of R.E.M.

The band joined figures from all over the industry in expressing their sadness at Petty’s passing.

Watch fan-shot videos of Coldplay and Buck’s performance

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Father John Misty offered up probably the most poignant and thoughtful tribute to Tom Petty with a soulful rendition of his “To Find a Friend” from the iconic Wildflowers record.

Performing at the Orpheum Theatre in Phoenix, AZ, Josh Tillman took some time to pay homage to the late singer-songwriter with a solo acoustic version of the song.

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Tributes to departed American icon Tom Petty have been pouring in since his death on Monday. Jeff Tweedy and company’s faithful rendition of the Hard Promises hit became a cathartic sing-along at the Music Factory. The world was still reeling from Petty’s death Monday following cardiac arrest at the age of 66.

Last night at the Irving Music Factory in Irving, TexasWilco showed their love with a faithful cover of Petty’s “The Waiting,” the lead single from 1981’s Hard Promises and Petty’s first ever No. 1 single on the U.S. Rock Charts. Nine more would follow: “You Got Lucky,” “Jammin’ Me,” “I Won’t Back Down,” “Runnin’ Down a Dream,” “Free Fallin’,” “Learning to Fly,” “Out in the Cold,” “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and “You Don’t Know How It Feels.” (Incredibly, Petty never scored a Top 5 single on the regular U.S. Charts, with “Free Fallin’” reaching as high as No. 7 in 1989.)

On Monday, Wilco also posted this video of them playing Petty’s “Listen to Her Heart” way back in 1995.

Photo: Allyce Andrew

An offering of praise for the late great master. Hey beautiful people,
I tend to be pretty quiet about celebrity deaths… but I’ve got some words about this one. 

I was raised on Tom Petty. Trapped in the car on long family road trips, his music made me feel colors. His songs felt like peepholes into a great wild world I knew I would one day be exploring myself… and he gave some good pointers. Every time I hear those records, no matter where I am or what’s going on, I feel as though I’m in the company of a dear old friend.

More than just being obviously one of the greatest songwriters ever, Petty was a rebel with a cause who took several bold and very public stands for what he believed in, resisting record label executives who wanted to use him as a pawn in their game. If you haven’t seen “Runnin’ Down a Dream,” the epic Heartbreakers documentary directed by Peter Bogdanovich, I highly recommend it!

To honor the life and death of this super rad being, on the night of his passing, I recorded a live video of my cover of his song “You Got Lucky.” Best Wishes Johanna Warren.

Initially following its release, the album received little attention in the United States.  But Following a U/K tour, it climbed up the UK album chart and the single “Anything That’s Rock ‘n’ Roll” became a hit in the UK. After nearly a year and many positive reviews, the album reached the U.S. charts, and eventually went Gold.

It’s a great American rock album with beautifully constructed songs and a passionate vocal from Tom Petty.
It runs in at a little over 1/2 an hour so it is slightly short by today’s standards but the music there in is wonderful.
Before I mention the songs individually , I should say that there isn’t the searing guitar overload of a live performance, in that the solos are short and not as stand-out in the mix.
Live, there was more emphasis on soloing but the songs are rock ‘n’ roll works of art and this is an album that you can’t tire of.
Luna, is a beautiful ballad, is my favourite song of the album and I would say that it is a unique song , part blues, part lullaby , with a beautiful organ melody that you’ll never forget.
huge anthemic track American Girl is a joy and the guitar solo at the end is a piece of magic,
The Wild One Forever and Mystery Man are beautiful , gentle songs with melodies to die for.
Throw in Fooled Again, Breakdown and Strangered in the Night et.al. and you have one of the best albums ever made. Wonderful stuff !.

The singles “Breakdown” and “American Girl” became an FM radio tracks that can still be heard today.

The album was recorded and mixed at the Shelter Studio, Hollywood, California.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

It’s about an hour before Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers play Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre for what may be the last time. Backstage, Petty is in his dressing room putting on a frontier rebel’s headdress to fight the chill. Keyboardist Benmont Tench is tweeting about the sad state of our country under Donald Trump. Bassist Ron Blair has battled stage fright for years since rejoining the Heartbreakers in 2002, after a 20-year sanity break. He wanders into Tom Petty’s dressing room and cops to something you’re not likely to admit to your bandleader unless you’ve known him for 40 years. “I’m kinda nervous, you know,” says Blair in a quiet voice.

Petty rarely describes himself as the leader of his band, but as “the older brother they sometimes have to listen to.” Tonight, he gives Blair some fatherly assurance and a toothy Southern smile: “Let me be nervous for you.”

The band takes the stage and blows through “Rockin’ Around (With You),” the first song on its self-titled first album, from 1976. Petty ends the next few songs strumming in front of the drum set, trading man-crush smiles with drummer Steve Ferrone (Tench jokes, “They should get a room”). Petty even grins through a joyous version of “Walls,” from 1996’s She’s the Onean album he’s complained about for nearly 20 years.

And then there’s a flash of lightning. Rain pours down. The Heartbreakers are shooed into the catacombs of Red Rocks, and 9,000 fans head for cover.

As the bandmates wait out the rain, Petty asks if they want to add their 1999 song “Swingin'” to the second half of the set. Everyone agrees: They do. The Heartbreakers aren’t a democracy, but more of a benevolent dictatorship. This is true when it comes to the set list. “We can make suggestions,” says Tench with a wry smile. “Sometimes they’re even accepted.”

After 20 minutes, the Heartbreakers retake the stage. They play “Swingin’,” which has a chorus where Petty lists icons who “went down swinging,” including Sonny Liston and Sammy Davis. Tench, who sings with Petty on the song, switches it up. Epstein provided the beautiful high harmonies on the record, so Tench sneaks in a tribute to his departed friend: “He went down swingin’/Just like Howie Epstein.”

Petty is supposed to do some acoustic numbers from Wildflowers, his 1994 solo album. There’s just one problem: His guitar is dead, soaked by the rain. There’s confusion and uncertainty on the band mates’ faces for a moment, like it’s a 1975 show at a honky-tonk in Gainesville. Then Petty and Campbell shout across the stage, “Ben, play something!”

Tench, the best keyboardist in American rock, breaks into a pastiche of boogie-woogie, a homage to pianist Pete Johnson. The group chimes in, not quite in sync, until Petty switches to Chuck Berry’s “Carol.” The Heartbreakers fall in line, sounding like the best bar band you don’t want to tell your friends about.

They encore with “American Girl.” The bandmates take a bow, wiping sweat and rain off their faces. Everyone exits, but Petty seems reluctant to leave. He takes a few steps toward the front of the stage and gives a last wave.

One word Petty and the band never mention: retirement. Petty still goes into his Malibu home office to write songs  right across from his home studio. He’s mostly a homebody, rarely even venturing the 45 minutes into Los Angeles unless it’s to see his two daughters and his young granddaughter. There was a Mudcrutch tour last year and a turn producing a record for former Byrds bassist Chris Hillman. The Heartbreakers will record again and play live in some capacity. After 40 years, it would be surprising if there weren’t a few regrets. “Howie should’ve gotten some lead on a record,” Tench says of Epstein. “He should’ve produced a record for the Heartbreakers. I would’ve loved that.” Then he shrugs. “But I’m not in charge.”

There’s been a valedictory feel to the Heartbreakers‘ 40th-anniversary tour, which Petty says is the band’s final country-spanning run – the “last big one.” Everyone else is a bit skeptical. “I’ve been hearing that for 15 years,” says guitarist and original Heartbreaker Mike Campbell. “We’ll see.”

The crowds are still there, something Petty is clearly proud of when we sit down in a hotel room on an off day. To be honest, he looks more jittery offstage than on. This may be because he is chain-smoking, alternating between Marlboros and vaping, perhaps as a concession to the Denver Ritz-Carlton’s smoking policy.

Petty says sleep is now his friend. “I need a new Netflix show, does anyone have any suggestions?” he asks just before his assistant ducks out of the room. Someone suggests Bloodlinea noirish series set in his native Florida.

Petty is defiant about the hyper pace of the tour, which hits 30 cities this spring and summer. “Unless you’ve done it, you can’t understand what it is,” says Petty, brushing his scarecrow hair out of his face. “And if you’re not really experienced, you will fall.”

What keeps the Heartbreakers together is simple: The band has been their life since 1976.  Benjamin Montmorency Tench III, was a prep-school kid and piano prodigy. Tench wears suits and went to Exeter, but he’s the fiery one. In the Peter Bogdanovich documentary on the Heartbreakers, 2007’s Runnin’ Down a Dream, Tench can be heard screaming at his bandmates to take things seriously. His nickname is Mad Dog. When Tench used to go on one of his tirades, a roadie would slide a dog bowl of water under his piano.

Petty, Campbell and 
Tench formed the nucleus of the band Mudcrutch,
which morphed into the
 Heartbreakers in 1976,
 after adding San Diego native Blair on bass and 
Stan Lynch on drums.
 Blair fried out and
 bailed in 1982. He opened a bikini shop in the Valley and was replaced by Howie Epstein, but the band loomed in his subconscious. “I’d dream I’d be walking to the stage, and be like, ‘I don’t know “Mary Jane’s Last Dance,”‘ recalls Blair. “I had half a dozen of those nightmares, so I started learning those songs so I could get a night’s sleep.”

This proved fortuitous when Epstein died of heroin-related complications in 2003. “I don’t think the band continues without Ron,” Tench tells me. “Bringing in someone new wouldn’t have worked.”

“About 20 years ago, we stopped doing soundchecks,” says Petty. “It eats up the whole day and we’d argue, and then you’d come back and the sound would be completely different with a crowd.”

The other game-changer was Dylan. By 1986, the band had toured relentlessly for a decade. Off the road, everyone was a mess – some members dealing with substance issues, some just dealing with real life. “The road and the studio are the only places I’ve ever felt completely OK,” says Petty, lighting another Marlboro. “In any other life situation I’m terribly retarded.” Petty got a call from Dylan asking if the band would back him on a tour. Petty raced out a “hell, yes.” Watching footage, you can see him smiling his head off, ecstatic to not be leading the show. The experience taught him how to be in the Heartbreakers, not just lead them. “That’s when we learned how to really be a band,” says Petty.

 

One word Petty and the band never mention: retirement. Petty still goes into his Malibu home office to write songs  right across from his home studio. He’s mostly a homebody, rarely even venturing the 45 minutes into Los Angeles unless it’s to see his two daughters and his young granddaughter. There was a Mudcrutch tour last year and a turn producing a record for former Byrds bassist Chris Hillman. The Heartbreakers will record again and play live in some capacity. After 40 years, it would be surprising if there weren’t a few regrets. “Howie should’ve gotten some lead on a record,” Tench says of Epstein. “He should’ve produced a record for the Heartbreakers. I would’ve loved that.” Then he shrugs. “But I’m not in charge.”

I cannot really say too much as I was a huge Petty admirer Really extremely Sad News, As LAPD issues a new statement saying they are now unable to confirm the death of Tom Petty I cross my fingers. He was found not breathing after a full cardiac arrest and placed on life support. It would be nice to think that he got to the gates of hell and they sent him back because he was better off with us.

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