Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Combs’

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Andrew Combs’ the Nashville singer-songwriter. Using his gifts for lyricism and wry observation, Combs weaves tales of love, sin and redemption, in a style that brings together classic country and contemporary pop. Nashville singer-songwriter Andrew Combs has released This Is The Light (Quarantine EP) All earnings from the EP will be donated to MusiCares’ COVID relief fund Combs also released a music video for the EP’s third track “Fire Escape.”

This is a collection of love songs — for my wife, my daughter, the moon, an Ingmar Bergman film — all little pieces I love about quarantine life that I tried to magnify,” Combs explains. The pandemic has obviously caused anxiety, pain, and frustration for many people, so it’s hard for me to relish in the fact I am able to stay at home and be creative, but I’d be lying if I said this whole experience has not been fruitful for my art.

Without any sort of pressure coming from the industry side, it’s been freeing to make some new recordings for fun! Everything about this EP happened organically. The songs were written quickly, recorded on my humble little recording rig (a laptop, keyboard, and two microphones), then sent on to musician friends to lay down tracks from their own home recording setups.

The EP features pedal steel and electric guitar from Spencer Cullum (Steelism), drums from Dominic Billett, bass and electric guitar from Jerry Bernhardt, and Dan Knobler mixed, mastered, and played various instruments. Filmmaker Austin Leih produced the video for “Fire Escape” and is currently working on another for the track “Your Light, Your Love.

This Is The Light (Quarantine EP)
Your Light, Your Love
This Is The Light
Fire Escape
To Love Someone
Through The Glass

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Dom Billett – drums and percussion
Jerry Bernhardt – bass
Spencer Cullum – pedal steel guitar
Andrew Combs – acoustic and electric guitars, keys, bgvs

Releases May 13th, 2020
All songs written and produced by Andrew Combs

Andrew Combs’ sophomore album, All These Dreams, marks a huge step forward for the Nashville singer-songwriter. Using his gifts for lyricism and wry observation, Combs weaves tales of love, sin and redemption, in a style that brings together classic country and contemporary pop.

Ideal Man was produced by Sam Cohen (Kevin Morby, Benjamin Booker) and follows Combs’ critically acclaimed 5 Covers & A Song EP, which featured his interpretations of songs by The Strokes, Radiohead, Blake Mills, Lucinda Williams, and Loudon Wainwright III.

The album sees Combs pushing the boundaries of his music as he sets aside his acoustic aside in favour of atmospheric synthesizers and distorted electric guitars. Ideal Man was captured live in Cohen’s Brooklyn studio and also features Combs’ longtime collaborators, drummer Dom Billet and guitarist/keyboardist/bassist Jerry Bernhardt.

“One of the things I really admired about Sam is that he wants to capture a moment,” says Combs.

“In the past, I’ve tended to pursue a studio sound that was really polished and clean, but I wanted to do something different this time, and I knew that working with Sam would lead to more of a loose, psychedelic, spaced-out vibe. We did everything live in the studio, even my vocals, and there’s a sense of immediacy and discovery in those early takes that you can’t recreate.”

The first track to be lifted from the album is Stars of Longing, Combs wrote the albums song with some of his favourite writers including Joe Henry, Dylan LeBlanc, Jeff Trott and Kenny Childers.

“It really changed the way that I write songs,” he reflects. “When I paint, I might start with a very abstract idea or maybe even just a feeling, but from there I’ll paint and scrape and paint and erase and keep on painting until something starts to take shape. I just let nature play out.”

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releases September 20th, 2019

Andrew Combs – vocals, keys, guitar
Sam Cohen – keys, guitar, bass, bgvs
Dominic Billett – drums, bgvs
Jerry Bernhardt – keys, guitar, bass, bgvs

Andrew Combs will release new album Ideal Man on 20th September 2019 via New West Records.

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Andrew Combs released a great album in 2017 titled Canyons Of My Mind. Now, he’s set to release an EP and head out on tour. The first track is a cover of Reptilia by The Strokes.

Combs kicks off a US tour on release day in his hometown at The Basement. About the tour, Combs notes, “Each show will include one or two “special guests” performing a few covers and originals as well. I’ll have the full band in tow, and look forward to playing the songs on the EP, as well as other covers and originals.”

From the EP ‘5 Covers & A Song,’ available July 27th

Andrew Combs doesn’t want to repeat himself. It’s his number one rule, his guiding principle, the only thing he’s really sure of as an artist. in fact, stressing that despite his traditionalist approach to songwriting and despite the fact that iconic 70’s singer-songwriters like Guy Clark and Paul Simon get tossed around every time he’s written about, Combs has little patience for musical retro-revivalism.

“I like art to push you in new directions and make you think and not just regurgitate what’s already been done, even though we all do that. I’ve done it, and still do it; To a certain degree, you can’t not do it. But I try,” says the 30-year-old songwriter.

Over the past five years, Combs has pulled off the trickiest of feats for a singer-songwriter, releasing three markedly different albums that nevertheless share a deeper sense of continuity in voice. Whereas his 2012 trad-country debut Worried Man presented a world of mid-twenties mishap and young Nashville man blues, 2015’s follow-up All These Dreams established the singer as a polished crooner gradually coming into his own as a narrative storyteller.

On Canyons Of My Mind, however, Combs blooms into a proper adult songwriter, one daring enough to both probe inward and reach outward, to hold a mirror up to one’s own interior insecurities and anxieties while at the same time acknowledging, for the first real time, that there are topical and societal concerns out in the world that are more pressing than one’s own personal life.

Canyons Of My Mind marks a gentle, if determined, split from Combs’ past work. For his new album, he decided to ditch the studio perfectionism of Steelism, the retro-minded Nashville band helmed by Combs’ longtime pals Spencer Cullum Jr. and Jeremy Fetzer that played on All These Dreams. He regrouped with an almost entirely new studio band, and more importantly, a newly determined sense of vision.

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On “Dirty Rain,” the first single from Canyons of My Mind, Andrew Combs pondered our fading grasp on consequence – and how, in an time now where we are all preoccupied with instant gratification and polish in the name of progress, we could be fast approaching a dark, joyless future. Self-awareness and a sensitivity for the world around him is a theme rich across the Nashville-based songwriter’s forthcoming third album.

From the album Canyons Of My Mind, available April 7th, 2017.

Thrilled to release this record into the world. “Canyons of My Mind” is out now via New West Records and Loose Music. A Big Thanks to my two buds Skylar Wilson and Jordan Lehning for producing and playing. Lots of love to Jeremy Ferguson for engineering and mixing. And to the wonderful band for bringing these songs to life: Dominic Billett, Michael Rinne, Ethan Ballinger.  thanks to Melissa Madison Fuller for the ace photos and Fetzer Design for the design. Andrew.

“I wrote ‘Blood Hunters’ in this post-tour haze, where you don’t know what to do with yourself,”

Combs says. “It’s about mental illness and this unknown force that is making you question everything. It takes 48 hours to acclimate at the end of tour, and it’s a weird time when you are in limbo. You get restless.”

Directed by Ry Cox, the video for “Blood Hunters” takes that fear of the unknown and puts it into a force tangible enough to look at – and nods at how some things are easier to confront when one returns to a more peaceful, natural state as Combs does, ankle-deep in the Piney River. With backup from Lera Lynn – whose recent album Shape Shifter shares a sense of sonic fearlessness with Canyons – the song opens with Combs‘ soothingly gorgeous vocals on haunting echo and spare electric guitar that crescendos into a fierce, Seattle-riffed fury. The musical gambit removes it even further away from the constraints of traditional country to forge a more experimental, rock-forward take on folk in the vein of Kevin Morby, Angel Olsen, Cass McCombs or even their forefather, Leonard Cohen.

“Canyons of My Mind” was produced by Skylar Wilson (Justin Townes Earle) and Jordan Lehning (Rodney Crowell) at Battle Tapes Studio in East Nashville, and features appearances from Caitlin Rose, who also co-wrote a song, as well as Erin Rae McKaskle and Lynn.

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Since 2012, Father John Misty, aka Josh Tillman, has unexpectedly emerged as a singular (if not undeniably, um, idiosyncratic) voice. Whether by virtue of his lyrics, which routinely defy the presumed polarities of wit and empathy; his live performances which may perhaps be described best as “intimately berzerk”, or the infuriating line he seems to occupy between canny and total fraud online or in interviews, Father John Misty has cultivated a rare space for himself in the musical landscape – that of a real enigma. Pure Comedy sees Tillman at the height of these powers: as a lyricist, and equally so a cultural observer – at times bordering on freakishly prescient. Tillman’s bent critiques, bared humanity and gently warped classic songwriting are all here in equal measure and – at 75 minutes – there’s a veritable fuck ton of it. The album navigates themes of progress, technology, fame, the environment, politics, aging, social media, human nature, human connection and his own role in it all with his usual candour, and in terms as timely as they are timeless.

Tillman wrote the majority of Pure Comedy throughout 2015 and recorded all the basic tracking and vocals live to tape (in no more than two takes each) at United Studios (fka the legendary Ocean Way Studios, favored by Frank Sinatra and The Beach Boys) in Los Angeles March 2016.

Pure Comedy was co-produced once again by Josh Tillman and long-time producer Jonathan Wilson; mixed by Tillman, Wilson and Trevor Spencer, and mastered by Bob Ludwig at Gateway Mastering Studios. The album features string, horn and choral arrangements from classical iconoclast Gavin Bryars (Jesus Blood Never Failed Me Yet, Sinking Of The Titanic), with additional contributions from Nico Muhly and Thomas Bartlett.

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Limited copies come with a 12 track bonus CD That’s Your Lot – The Bedroom Tapes. Following a breakthrough 2016 which saw them sell out London’s Scala, fill tents at Glastonbury, Reading and Leeds and Latitude, ink a US deal with Canvasback / Atlantic and release a run of critically acclaimed singles, Blaenavon release their long awaited debut album, That’s Your Lot. Recorded with Grammy-winning producer Jim Abbiss (Arctic Monkeys, Adele, Bjork) the LP marks a certain milestone for the band – a sumptuous, thrilling and brave collection of songs written throughout their teenage years and now fully realised. Intensely personal, yet exploring the universal experiences of friendship, sadness, hope, love held and lost, and all the confusions of youth – a body of work to help define a generation. That’s Your Lot includes I Will Be The World, Let’s Pray and My Bark Is Your Bite – a more than impressive run of singles championed by the likes of Annie Mac, Zane Lowe, Huw Stephens, NME and Fader, whilst collectively racking up over 1,500,000 Spotify streams. The album will also feature explosive new single Orthodox Man, Blaenavon’s most immediate moment to date and already a firm fan favourite following a series of incredible live performances.

2LP – Limited Double Blue Vinyl with Fold Out Poster.

Diet cig swear i'm good at this fkr0882

 

Diet Cig are here to have fun. They’re here to tear you away from the soul-sucking sanctity of your dumpster-fire life and replace it with pop-blessed punk jams about navigating the impending doom of adulthood when all you want is to have ice-cream on your birthday. Alex Luciano (guitar and vocals) and Noah Bowman (drums) have been playing music together ever since Luciano interrupted the set of Bowman’s other band for a lighter. The New Paltz, New York duo have since released the infectious, 2015 ‘Over Easy’ EP that introduced consistent sing-a-long lyrics with thrashing drums and strums that never held back. ‘Swear I’m Good At This’ is the first full-length from the band and accumulates their tenacity for crafting life-affirming, relatable tales with a gutsy heart at their core. Luciano has the ability to write lyrics that are both vulnerable and badass, perfecting a storm of emotive reflection that creates a vision of a sweaty, pumped-up room screaming these lines in unison. Diet Cig make it okay to be the hot mess that you are.

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When Happyness first burst into the public conscience with 2013’s debut single ‘It’s On You’, their spirited take on US college rock was as big a surprise as it was an instant hit. The resulting full length, ‘Weird Little Birthday’, went on to feature in many of 2014’s End Of Year album lists. Worldwide tours, an NME Award, a re-issue on much-loved label Moshi Moshi Recordings (Bar/None in US) and millions of plays later, it is with some anticipation now that the band finally reveal the full details of the follow up.

Titled ‘Write In’, released through Moshi Moshi Recordings and featuring artwork from the band’s own Jon EE Allan, the record was made in the band’s own studio above a now-abandoned bookshop, then finished and mixed with Adam Lasus at his LA home studio.

‘Write In’ sets its stall out as an outward looking, inventive and thoughtful progression from their debut. Drawing on an array of influences including Roxy Music, The Beach Boys, Randy Newman, Sonic Youth, Big Star and Pierre Cavalli, the direction is best summed up by Jon EE Allan; “I’d like to think this record looks outside the little American alt-rock sphere we were looking in on. I think we used to be very afraid of being earnest. And now we’re able to be tender or heartfelt without feeling too guilty about it.”

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One band who have been threatening a big breakthrough is female four-piece The Big Moon, who in 2016 were dubbed the coolest young band in Britain are destined to be huge in 2017 with their Slits and Elastica-inspired punky gems.

“Definitely a band to watch” – London On The Inside
“With each new release, they continue to reach brand new heights” – The Line of Best Fit
“Another sign of the band’s blossoming maturity and growing confidence as songwriters” – Clash
“London’s most exciting new quartet … The Big Moon are readying to shoot for the stars” – NME
“Another introduction to one of the buzziest new bands on the scene, it’s proof that they’re making all the right moves on their road to the top”

Andrew combs   canyons of my mind   vjcd231

Canyons of My Mind is, as its title suggests, a landscape where the personal and the pastoral converge. Drawing inspiration from the biographies of literary figures like Charles Wright and Jim Harrison, Combs has created an album that explores the notion of sustainability in its many facets – artistic, economic, spiritual, environmental. “When I set out to record All These Dreams, I had a distinct vision of what I wanted the record to sound like. It was a cocktail of the Roy Orbison, Glen Campbell, Nilsson vibes that you can hear right there on the surface,” Combs says. “Canyons is much more personal. It’s a testament to my acceptance of who I am as a man, and who I am becoming.” The quiet struggles and satisfactions of carving out an identity in a world gone wrong are palpable throughout the album. Whether questing through the labyrinth of his own spiritual yearning, (Heart of Wonder), recreating a rail rider’s full-body sensation of freedom beneath an azure Montana sky (Rose Colored Blues), imagining a near-future dystopia where the very idea of green spaces has been annihilated (Dirty Rain), or channeling the desire of a peeping Tom who has fallen in love with his sylvan quarry (Hazel), Combs refines the vulnerable vagabond persona he mastered on All These Dreams while pushing it beyond those boundaries, into a more pastoral realm aligned with artists like Nick Drake and Tim Buckley.

On “Dirty Rain,” the first single from “Canyons of My Mind”, Andrew Combs pondered our fading grasp on consequence – and how, in an age preoccupied with instant gratification in the name of progress, we could be fast approaching a dark, joyless future. Self-awareness and a sensitivity for the world around him is a theme rich across the Nashville-based songwriter’s forthcoming third album. And on his newest track, “Blood Hunters,” he’s taking time to address the fragile relationship we all have with our own psyches. Watch the exclusive video above, with a sci-fi vibe that nods to Stranger Things .

Directed by Ry Cox, the video for “Blood Hunters” takes that fear of the unknown and puts it into a force tangible enough to look at – and nods at how some things are easier to confront when one returns to a more peaceful, natural state as Combs does, ankle-deep in the Piney River. With backup from Lera Lynn – whose recent album Shape Shifter shares a sense of sonic fearlessness with Canyons – the song opens with Andrew Combs‘ soothingly gorgeous vocals on haunting echo and spare electric guitar that crescendos into a fierce, Seattle-riffed fury. The musical gambit removes it even further away from the constraints of traditional country to forge a more experimental, rock-forward take on folk in the vein of Kevin Morby, Angel Olsen, or Cass McCombs .

As is also the case with “Dirty Rain,” the video for “Blood Hunters” prominently features children, and Canyons thinks often not only about growing up and settling into different definitions of adulthood, but the future we’re paving for our offspring. As a soon-to-be father himself – Combs‘ wife, Kristin, is pregnant – it’s a weight on his mind that is now more personal than ever. “The record was written before the news of the baby,” Combs says, “but the videos weren’t, and that’s definitely something I have been thinking about a lot: bringing up a child in this day and age. Technology, the craziness going on, everything – it’s scary times, bringing a child into that.” As echoed in the clip, there’s a monster looming, though it looks different for all of us: for some, it’s 10 stories tall with scales. For others, it’s 6’2″ with an orange tan and bad comb-over.

Canyons was produced by Skylar Wilson (Justin Townes Earle) and Jordan Lehning (Rodney Crowell) at Battle Tapes Studio in East Nashville, and features appearances from Caitlin Rose, who also co-wrote a song, as well as Erin Rae McKaskle and Lynn. Andrew Combs will kick off a tour to support the album, available April 7th via New West, in March.

Andrew Combs’ sophomore album, All These Dreams, marks a huge step forward for the Nashville singer-songwriter. Using his gifts for lyricism and wry observation, Combs weaves tales of love, sin and redemption, in a style that brings together classic country and contemporary pop.

What is it about Combs vocal journey across its registers that evokes both deep sensual pleasure and sadness “Fake Plastic Trees.”  is one of Nashville’s most poetically gifted young singer-songwriters Andrew Combs , echoes the work of these greatest in “Dirty Rain,” the first song from his deeply heartfelt third album “Canyons Of My Mind”, out April 7th on New West Records.

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Combs, on Canyons. The album’s orchestrations are still highly evocative, but less directly suggestive of shiny modernity. “Dirty Rain,” is a nostalgic lament for wide open spaces that’s really a protest against Nashville’s rapid gentrification, gains intensity from the swirl of a string section mid-song; the crescendo is gentle, however, mirroring his undulating vocal line and the hazy circles of Jim Hoke’s pedal-steel guitar. “What will all the little children say, when the only place to play is in the dirty rain?” Combs ruefully intones,

 

 

For any young artist, an important leap happens when influences are absorbed and the act of mining the past transforms into something personal. That’s what happens on All These Dreams, the second album from the singer-songwriter Andrew Combs, Combs is an impeccable craftsman indebted to not only the troubadour lineageof his native Texas, but to that magical moment at the turn of the 1960s into the 1970s when country, soul, rock and pop balladry all mingled on sophisticated albums by artists as varied as Kris Kristofferson or James Taylor “All These Dreams” flows the way albums did then, with Andrew Combs’s vulnerable voice lifted up within lush arrangements in songs that balance pensiveness with yearning.

“Nothing To Lose,” based around Spencer Cullum, Jr.’s steel-guitar pirouettes, is one of the album’s signature songs. For its video, director Tim Duggan mirrors what Combs and his tight group of collaborators (including Cullum’s duo Steelism and the producers Jordan Lehning and Skylar Wilson) accomplish musically, creating a vintage feel that also registers up close. In elegant monotone, rumpled suit jacket and loosened bolo tie, Combs sings into a vintage microphone. He needs a shave. “Pride got the best of me; she took the rest of me,” he murmurs as the music swirls around him. The camera pans to reveal Combs’s band; at one point, backup singers Erin Rae Mckaskle and Juliana Daily appear superimposed at the front of the frame, a couple of Mod angels. The video keeps Combs’ music at the center while opening up a flood of associations. It’s a classic performance perfect for right now.

American Singer Songwriter from Dallas Texas Andrew Combs, After a session with Caitin Rose two years ago, the country singer-songwriter and his band for a vocal-heavy performance of ‘Pearl’, taken from his latest album ‘All These Dreams’. Also here a  little video of “Pearl” we did last year at the wonderful End of the Road Festival in England. Andrew Combs will be supporting Justin Townes Earle at the Nottingham Glee Club on the 4th February, he is also performing at the Rough Trade record Store in Nottingham on the same evening around about 5-30 pm