Posts Tagged ‘Will Taylor’

Flyte are Winchester’s own indie-rock success story. Formed in 2013, the now-trio (Will Taylor, Jon Supran and Nick Hill) have gone from strength to strength with each remarkable release and their sophomore effort corroborates this. At face value, ‘This Is Really Going To Hurt’ is a quintessential breakup album. Ever-present in life and literature, heartbreak is an inevitable theme eventually approached by artists of all areas. While Flyte have previously gained traction through works taking a more vicarious approach, this album is a deeply personal exploration of heartbreak. Vocalist Will Taylor journeyed through the end of an eight-year relationship with all the turmoil you’d expect, but here has managed to carefully document the feelings involved in a delicate and dignified way. His mindful nature and a drive to share his cathartic writing allow this record to exude a matchless sensitivity in its lyricism.

‘Easy Tiger’ is both the opener of the album and a perfect example of such sensitivity. Bearing the album’s title dominantly in its lyrics, this track is the preparatory build to the rest of the album. The soft guitar melodies bring an air of comfort to the foreboding descent into a thoroughly varied and emotional collection of music. ‘Losing You’ swoops in next with a potent, raw form of storytelling. Encapsulating the nostalgia of new romance versus its demise; it’s simple but flawlessly compelling.

‘I’ve Got a Girl’ is a punchy gem which alongside being a fun listen, serves to gently accelerate the pace of the record (written following the departure of former-member Sam Berridge). Launching straight into its dramatic lyricism, no time is wasted in portraying the hurt and subtle distress that runs throughout. This track has an undeniable appeal with its moody composition; dramatic keys and thundery bass giving it an edge akin to early 2000s alt-rock, while slick production cements its modern feel. Flyte crafted the album with the skilled hands of producers Justin Raisen and Andrew Sarlo, and mixing engineer Ali Chant. A mellow, steady, building instrumental meets an initially minimal vocal decorated with Flyte’s classic creative harmony in ‘Under The Skin’. Taylor’s voice builds to hold subtle anguish as we reach the busy, almost chaotic climax of the track. This is met cohesively with thumping guitar, crashing percussion and whirring synths.

We’ve been fortunate enough to feast our ears on half of the tracks from ‘This Is Really Going To Hurt’ as singles already, but the as-yet-unheard tracks bring yet more depth to the album. The first of which is the simply exquisite ‘Everyone’s a Winner’ . Despite its subject matter, the record is never accusatory; just attentively observational and introspective to a refreshing degree. Littered with choral-like harmonies, ‘Trying To Break Your Heart’ feels as though it’s been freshly plucked from a coming-of-age movie where a sense of melancholy is drenched in summery, jolly instrumentation.

As the band told us in an interview back in the summer of 2020, “every song has a very distinct personality” which stands true as the smooth, shoegaze dream, ‘Love Is An Accident’ begins. We’re then launched into the rockier ‘There’s a Woman’. Here we find classic, janky guitar and darker tonality, intermitted with calmer moments that tease at a lingering sense of romance. The end of the song is heavy with brass and synth, and the continued harmonies we’ve come to expect and love from Flyte over the years.

‘Mistress America’ features echoey vocals set among sentimental acoustic guitar in a lively track. It has a definite sense of being hopeful and joyfully romantic, with a relevant mid-American feel. This begins to round ‘This Is Really Going To Hurt’ off quite nicely, though the real treat waiting at the album’s close is ‘Never Get To Heaven’. Sleepy, hazy and comforting, it conclusively signals the end of an arduous period of time experienced by Taylor.

With their second album, a new vulnerability in the band’s work is clear. While a breakup record, delving deeper unveils a tapestry of raw emotion, polished instrumentation and lyrical complexity. It almost feels invasive to listen to Taylor’s plight in this way, especially as we’re used to Flyte’s relatively impersonal previous works. Here, the lyricism is beautifully and brutally self-aware. To tackle personal experiences and adjust to working as a trio were Flyte’s latest challenges, and each member played their part to meet them with grace; creating some gorgeous music on the way.

words from onegreatsong

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Flyte first touched down last summer with some new songs ahead of a forthcoming album when they unveiled their video for “Losing You,” which was directed by award-winning filmmaker Mark Jenkin, and have since unveiled a new album titled “This Is Really Going to Hurt”, which releases this Friday. Arriving on the tail end of vocalist Will Taylor’s eight-year relationship, the LP piles more emotional heft onto their already dramatic rock sound.

Even for their stripped-down “Neighborhoods” session, the trio pack a punch into vocal harmonies on album tracks “Trying to Break Your Heart” and “Everyone’s a Winner,” with the band members crowding around Taylor’s single acoustic guitar. Shot in tight close-up as the wind blows in London’s St Dunstan-in-the-East, watch their performance of both tracks below.

The UK band play two tracks from their forthcoming LP “This Is Really Going to Hurt.”

The highly-anticipated second album “This Is Really Going To Hurt”. Recorded in LA last year with collaborators Justin Raisen (Angel Olsen, Yves Tumor), Andrew Sarlo (Big Thief, Bon Iver) and mixing engineer Ali Chant (Aldous Harding), the record is a lucid documentation of lead singer Will Taylor’s formative relationship break-up, and follows the ending of a relationship through the stages of grief and acceptance. The title is evocative of knowing the decision you are about to make will change your life forever. The first singles from the album, ‘Easy Tiger’ and ‘Losing You’, served as stunning introductions.

One of the very best UK bands.

Due this April, London three-piece Flyte’s sophomore album is a labour of love – finely-crafted rootsy indie rock across ten timeless-sounding tracks. Made alongside collaborators Justin Raisen (Angel Olsen, Yves Tumor), Andrew Sarlo (Big Thief, Bon Iver) and engineer Ali Chant (Aldous Harding), the band’s extraordinary three-part harmonies span a rawer space than they covered in their 2017 debut album. It’s off-kilter, unpolished, music for music’s sake.

Flyte’s “I’ve Got A Girl” has been bouncing around my head non-stop ever since they released it and now we get a little video compliment to go along with the track that stars Tina Malone, star of the UK version of Shameless Feeling like a post-Halloween hangover, the video has a much different vibe than the one for “Losing You” and goes all in on a David Lynch eerie vibe that captures this sound that is very much Flyte, but a new form that we haven’t quite heard before.

watch the music video for “I’ve Got a Girl” below and stay tuned for a more Flyte related content coming very soon.

This Is Really Going To Hurt, on the 9th of April. This will be Flyte’s second album and features the previously released songs: Easy Tiger, Losing You, I’ve Got a Girl as well as the brand new, Under The Skin. This album beautifully weaves together complex and rich vocal arrangements and melodies, with lyrics steeped in literary imagery.

‘This is really going to Hurt’ follows up from their debut album The Loved Ones which was acclaimed by The Sunday Times as “The Best British debut album of the year” and is set to cement the band as refreshingly mature and exceptionally talented.

It’s hard to believe that it’s been nearly six years since I stumbled across the music of Flyte, one of the best bands out of the U.K., or anywhere, for that matter. While Covid has screwed up the release and touring plans for their looming second album, the band has still been slowly laying down the foundation by releasing a handful of new singles, such as the newly released “I’ve Got A Girl.” Late last month I had the pleasure of video chatting on Zoom with the band’s very own Will Taylor and Nick Hill. We spoke about the new track, how much of it really is about the departure of a founding member and friend, the evolution of their sound over the years, some hints of the new record, as well as what movies they’ve been watching. This is an interview I had wanted to do ever since I accidentally discovered their early single “Light Me Up” thanks to a brilliant working YouTube algorithm.

A new song for December. Just a guitar and our three voices this time. Will wrote this as a wee 14 year old boy but somehow it only made sense to release it now, at the end of this truly bizarre year.

Flyte have returned with yet another new song with “Never Get To Heaven” and no surprise, it’s another stunning listen. The track is the latest song shared from their next body of work, which we should be getting sometime early in the new year that we all want to desperately get to as soon as possible. “Never Get To Heaven” sounds like a classic song that has been with you all of your life and for frontman Will Taylor, in some ways, it has. He actually penned this track when he was just 14-years-old, replicating a chant from his stint in the scouts as an 8 year old. He reworked it again when he was 14 and then discovering its potential as an adult in today’s world, realizing its perfect use as an eulogy to the end of his adult relationship.

It’s Flyte at their most stripped down and vulnerable, with their three voices sharing the stage as a sad acoustic guitar guides them home. But it’s all they need to send the message home and they nail it, as always. Find the full quote from Taylor about the song below, along with a stream of the track as well as a great live performance that the band did in the forest at Blenheim Palace. “Funnily enough, I wrote this song aged only 14. I remember thinking it would be a very clever and grown up exercise to re-appropriate a chant from my stint in the scouts as an 8 year old. My 14 year old self, then advanced in years and wisdom, putting a post modern spin on a childish relic. Using it as a vehicle for all my pain and suffering.

Strangely, so very many years later, it had achieved it’s depth. It had become the perfect eulogy to the end of my adult relationship. An adolescent attempt at world weariness had become meaningful. For an album based entirely around a break up, it’s a god’s-eye view, nursery rhyme that closes the album with the perfect quiet defiance The post Flyte share new song “Never Get To Heaven” first appeared on We All Want Someone To Shout For music blog.

Flyte have returned with their brand new single “I’ve Got A Girl” another look at what’s to come with their eventual next body of work. Based on their most recent singles “Losing You” and “Easy Tiger”, “I’ve Got A Girl” is a slightly different sound than many had been expecting. It tackles something heavy and personal for the band – the departure of former member Sam Berridge.

As the band’s lead singer Will Taylor describes: Where all the other tracks on this record are about a romantic relationship coming to an end, this covers the loss of a creative one. Breaking up with a friend and band member. There’s definitely a bitterness listening back to it, but at its core is the sound of a band completely letting go and having a genuinely cathartic time. We recorded it very late at night and more than a little intoxicated,” says lead singer Will Taylor.”

The track sees the band venting through an understandably tough subject and finding a bit of a new sound for them that has some hints of their old sound just delivered in a more refined way based on where they are as artists today. Taylor gets to deliver not just one, but two guitar solos and there is a bit of a dark art-pop sound that feels very Grizzly Bear at times. But like the best artists, they keep on surprising us at every turn and yet still keeping their core sound perfectly intact.

Their new record is shaping up to be something really special and we have only gotten a few pieces of it so far. We can’t wait to get more from this record very soon.

Enjoy a listen to “I’ve Got A Girl”. Flyte, under exclusive licence to Island Records, a division of Universal Music Operations Limited

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Hovvdy released a new single, “Runner,” last month, and now they’ve followed it with a second, which “is about the mixed emotions when a relationship has to change or end,” Will Taylor says. “Grief and relief. We were excited to pull the guitars back to let the vocals and ambient textures shine. The clank and swing of the programmed drums create a resonance and energy that brings it all together.”

Hailing from Austin, Texas, indie-pop duo Hovvdy are back again with another sumptuous treat for our ears with new single; ‘I’m Sorry’. Shortly after their release of ‘Runner’ — released just last month — ‘I’m Sorry’ is Will Taylor and Charlie Martin at their finest; delightfully odd as always, whilst showcasing dreamy melodies that are best suited to lying in bed on a calm Sunday morning.

Slightly muted vocal melodies greet us from the get-go, along with a reverberated kick and snare beat that echoes through your soul to the very end. The song in its entirety feels somewhat zephyr-like; feelings of heartache but also of healing: a journey downstream that Hovvdy are kind enough to let us in on. Gradually swelling in volume, accompanied by wispy, mellow vocals throughout; ‘I’m Sorry’ is a harmonically beautiful, and melodically considerate track — created for the disenfranchised, and executed to foggy, ambiguous perfection.

Fundamentally acoustic, Hovvdy also incorporates elements of electronica in the most subtle ways; pulling us in gently at the beginning with synth-enhanced vocals and rhythms, then reverting to their familiar, honestly indie style, before welcoming back the electronic-inspired rhythms, vocals and synths for the end of the track — bringing closure in a familiar, comforting way.

Stacking on Will Taylor’s growing pop sensibility, “I’m Sorry” carves a beat around the artist’s hollowed-out, echoing vocals. Jumbled feelings in flux swirl a cloud of granular electronic ambience. “I’m sorry,” he sings. “Going under the water again.”

Of the song and stylistic venture, Taylor says: “‘I’m Sorry’ is about the mixed emotions when a relationship has to change or end. Grief and relief. We were excited to pull the guitars back to let the vocals and ambient textures shine. The clank and swing of the programmed drums create a resonance and energy that brings it all together.”

Effortlessly minimalistic in nature, Hovvdy is consistent in delivering stunningly layered instrumentals lead by melodically sweet, wistful vocals that haunt you and soothe you in equal measure; providing a plethora of influences from pop to hip-hop. All-in-all, ‘I’m Sorry’ is the oh-so-familiar nostalgia trip that Hovvdy never fail to contribute to this ever-expanding world of plentiful music that we’re currently living in. Unapologetically honest, inexplicably raw, and invariably delightful; I’m Sorry is yet another notable mark on the musical map — transcending above normality and welcoming us in to their world of authentic memories.

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we’re very excited to share an album of demos today. please consider supporting us or an artist you love on Bandcamp today as they have graciously forfeited their cut of sales.

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demos for Heavy Lifter written & recorded at home by Hovvdy.
mastered by Ben Littlejohn.
art by Ben Johnson (@johnsonstretch).
Band Members
Charlie Martin, Will Taylor
Released March 20th, 2020

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I love Flyte why this band are not hugely known and selling loads of records is the understatement of all time. They’re a three-piece band presently with the addition of a occasional Stave sister  with my heart in their hands and their hearts on their sleeves. Their debut record “The Loved Ones” felt like a secret between the few, me and the band, Will Taylor and the band continually charmed and surprised. It’s a gorgeous, passionate, musically beautiful album. It’s desperate and haunting. It’s one of those covers that covers your bones. But enough about their album. The band have been touring and demoing a new collection of songs for the last six seven months and “Easy Tiger” is among them .

“Easy Tiger” is a break-up track. It’s a predator with a thorn in its paw. It’s brought low, it’s humble, it’s sad. It’s brilliant for all of that. Will Taylor has a giant vocal register, but he is so subdued on this track, the emotionalism is totally carried by the instrumentation. The music is anxious in “Easy Tiger,” while the melody is steady, rhythmic and calm. It’s the embodiment of trying to keep your cool while you see an ex at a party.

Give Flyte the love they deserve today. I reckon a new record will be dropping soon from them, so listen to The Loved Ones and their 2019 EP White Roses (If you can get a copy… I Can’t for love or money, Will )after you give “Easy Tiger” a listen.

It’s another woozy, moody exhale, “Easy Tiger is an ideal turbulent indulgence to soundtrack our moments of doubt and trouble. I fell in hard for this UK band Flyte, Iv’e seen them maybe eight-ten times and they still astonish me everytime. Please also listen to their White Roses EP and its truly breathtaking title track – one of my all-time favourites tracks for the year – and you couldn’t ask for a more striking, well-executed return than “Easy Tiger.” Soothing yet unsettling all at once, the song was written as a precursor to the emotional overhaul of a breakup, however its message feels all the more universal today. Easy tiger: This is only gonna get worse

Music video by Flyte performing Easy Tiger. under exclusive licence to Island Records, a division of Universal Music Operations Limited

 

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“Easy Tiger” is the group’s first new release since last year’s White Roses EP, and arrives with a video directed by BAFTA-winning director Mark Jenkin.

Vocalist Will Taylor says of the song, “When I wrote “Easy Tiger” I was exorcising shame, heartbreak, jealously; almost impossible emotions to process, I almost regretted writing it. There’s a darkness and an emotional brashness to Mark’s work that suited the song perfectly. It would have been hard to trust anyone else with it.”

Jenkin says of the accompanying visual, “The challenge was to make something that felt amorphous – to create something that has a tactile feel to it, is a single artefact, something that feels like a found film and something that is timeless, abstract and unidentifiable in some ways. For me, what’s exciting is those limitations – this is where my strength is, the great unknown.

Flyte’s “Easy Tiger” single is out now on Island Records.

Band Members: Will Taylor, Nick Hill, Jon Supran, Sam Berridge

Easy/Turns Blue

Taking inspiration from the original concept behind the founding of Saddle Creek, as an attempt to highlight our home city through music and art, we began the Document Series in 2017. Each release featured in the Document Series is comprised of an exclusive record featuring unreleased music from artists outside of the label’s roster, along with a specially curated zine created by the artist. The fifth installment in the series comes from Austin, Texas based Hovvdy.

Hovvdy (pronounced “howdy”) is the writing and recording project of Charlie Martin and Will Taylor. The duo, both primarily drummers, first met in the fall of 2014 and quickly bonded over a love for quiet music. Within a few weeks, they had combined songs and began recording their first EP in bedrooms and family homes across Texas.

By 2016 the two had committed to each others growth in songwriting and recording, resulting in their debut album Taster , originally released on Sports Day Records and reissued in 2017 by Double Double Whammy. They followed this in 2018 with the release of Cranberry , which Pitchfork described as, “Foggy, warm, and wistful, it sounds like faded time.” Hovvdy has found a unique identity in rhythmic, down-tempo pop songs that are hopeful, yet melancholy; relatable, yet distinguishable.