Posts Tagged ‘Future Islands’

Future Islands’ romantic synth sound scales new heights with “On the Water”, the Baltimore trio’s most ambitious and fully realized statement yet. Built around a song cycle exploring love, loss, and memory, their latest album finds the band continuing to deliver pounding rhythms, swelling melodies, and undeniable hooks – but finding new ways to probe inner space and tug at hearts.

Convening in March 2011 in Elizabeth City, NC’s historic, waterfront Andrew S. Sanders House, vocalist Samuel T. Herring, bassist William Cashion, and keyboardist Gerrit Welmers lived together in a space that served as both studio and sleeping quarters. The band used this tranquil retreat to refine their most reflective and mature batch of songs to date, adding new material in the process.

What emerged is a lush yet visceral album about two parallel journeys–one physical and one psychological. On the Water’s narrator offers enough detail that their story feels personal, yet open enough that any listener can inhabit each twist and emotional pang as their own.

Travelling on foot, we seek something – an exorcism, an epiphany, an ending. Memories wash across us as in life: non-linear, linked by emotional resonance rather than conventional chronology. And so, the pain of letting go channeled by “The Great Fire” collides with a moment’s fleeting serenity in the Eno-esque “Open”; the triumphant rallying cry “Give Us the Wind” despite its confident declaration of individual strength, remains a mile away from final chapter “Tybee Island” It is there the song cycle ends, and what is discovered in “Tybee Island” will be as different as the lives lived by each person who finds their way to this album.

On the Water may unearth aural memories as well. The mind may flash upon our first encounters with New Order’s “Ceremony,” David Bowie’s “Heroes,” or The Cure’s Disintegration, memories which, are continually reborn and re-imagined in the context of the here and now. And as the song-cycle’s narrator comes to terms with his own memories, his singular journey collapses into the collective experience of album-closer “Grease.” It is here that the “I” of the nine previous songs collapses into the “we” of Future Islands, now singing the literal journey of the people who came together by the ocean to deliver these songs into our ears. Far from just a narrative trope, the ocean played an integral role in On the Water’s creation. The bulk of the album was recorded with waves pounding sand mere feet away. The album opens and closes with field recordings made by the band on a nearby dock, and one pivotal track, “Tybee Island” began with vocals recorded on the beach (subsequently fleshed out in the studio with additional instrumentation).

The ocean inhabits every note of these songs. On the Water is an addictive ride that demands repeat listens, eagerly awaiting the test of time. To produce these results, Future Islands fleshed out its sound with the additions of cello, violin, marimba, and field recordings. As with their 2010 breakthrough album In Evening Air, On the Water was produced by frequent collaborator Chester Endersby Gwazda, perhaps best known as producer of Dan Deacon’s Bromst. Noted guests include Wye Oak’s Jenn Wasner, who provides vocals on “The Great Fire,” and Double Dagger’s Denny Bowen on live drums and additional percussion.

For all its undeniable weight, On the Water is not a sullen concept album. Every track on the record works both as a contribution to the whole and as a stand-alone pleasure, evident in the insistent throbs, addictive melodies, and stirring vocals of tracks like “Close to None” “Balance” and first single “Before the Bridge”

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Make no mistake, On the Water is a record that aims to both break your heart and heal your wounds. 

Released August 12th, 2020

Future Islands‘ romantic synth sound scales new heights with “On the Water”, the Baltimore trio’s most ambitious and fully realized statement yet. Built around a song cycle exploring love, loss, and memory, their latest album finds the band continuing to deliver pounding rhythms, swelling melodies, and undeniable hooks – but finding new ways to probe inner space and tug at hearts.

Convening in March 2011 in Elizabeth City, NC’s historic, waterfront Andrew S. Sanders House, vocalist Samuel T. Herring, bassist William Cashion, and keyboardist Gerrit Welmers lived together in a space that served as both studio and sleeping quarters. The band used this tranquil retreat to refine their most reflective and mature batch of songs to date, adding new material in the process.

What emerged is a lush yet visceral album about two parallel journeys–one physical and one psychological. “On the Water’s” narrator offers enough detail that their story feels personal, yet open enough that any listener can inhabit each twist and emotional pang as their own.

Travelling on foot, we seek something – an exorcism, an epiphany, an ending. Memories wash across us as in life: non-linear, linked by emotional resonance rather than conventional chronology. And so, the pain of letting go channeled by “The Great Fire” collides with a moment’s fleeting serenity in the Eno-esque “Open”; the triumphant rallying cry “Give Us the Wind, “ despite its confident declaration of individual strength, remains a mile away from final chapter “Tybee Island.” It is there the song cycle ends, and what is discovered in “Tybee Island” will be as different as the lives lived by each person who finds their way to this album.

On the Water may unearth aural memories as well. The mind may flash upon our first encounters with New Order’s “Ceremony,” David Bowie’s “Heroes,” or The Cure’s Disintegration, memories which, are continually reborn and re-imagined in the context of the here and now. And as the song-cycle’s narrator comes to terms with his own memories, his singular journey collapses into the collective experience of album-closer “Grease.” It is here that the “I” of the nine previous songs collapses into the “we” of Future Islands, now singing the literal journey of the people who came together by the ocean to deliver these songs into our ears. Far from just a narrative trope, the ocean played an integral role in On the Water’s creation. The bulk of the album was recorded with waves pounding sand mere feet away. The album opens and closes with field recordings made by the band on a nearby dock, and one pivotal track, “Tybee Island,” began with vocals recorded on the beach (subsequently fleshed out in the studio with additional instrumentation).

The ocean inhabits every note of these songs. On the Water is an addictive ride that demands repeat listens, eagerly awaiting the test of time. To produce these results, Future Islands fleshed out its sound with the additions of cello, violin, marimba, and field recordings. As with their 2010 breakthrough album In Evening Air, On the Water was produced by frequent collaborator Chester Endersby Gwazda, perhaps best known as producer of Dan Deacon’s Bromst. Noted guests include Wye Oak’s Jenn Wasner, who provides vocals on “The Great Fire,” and Double Dagger’s Denny Bowen on live drums and additional percussion.

http://

For all its undeniable weight, On the Water is not a sullen concept album. Every track on the record works both as a contribution to the whole and as a stand-alone pleasure, evident in the insistent throbs, addictive melodies, and stirring vocals of tracks like “Close to None,” “Balance,” and first single “Before the Bridge.”

Make no mistake, On the Water is a record that aims to both break your heart and heal your wounds.

Released August 12th, 2020

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The 2020 festival season is cancelled, I recently remembered one of my favourite moments ever which happened back in 2017 when I watched Future Islands at NOTTINGHAM Rock City the smallish venue. They were on the brink of their big breakthrough, the infamous Singles album has just been released and I finally got into their music. It was a triumphant show; I cried, I laughed, I moshed around – they never got better than in this moment and this summer but obviously, although Future Islands are still producing great alternative pop anthems. “For Sure” is such another great anthem and their first new single in three years. It’s catchy, it got that captivating groove, Sam Herrings warm vocal performance, Jenn Wasner from Wye Oak and backing vocals, and also a really great music video, directed by Sam Mason. It might look like a car commercial first but it turns into something more beautiful actually, something that isn’t actually worshipping technology despite the fact that cars are the protagonists here. Well, it’s pop poetry and that’s a an attribute that fits quite well to Future Islands.

‘For Sure’ by Future Islands, out now

Future Islands

On April 7th, Future Islands will be releasing their fifth album, “The Far Field”. It is their first album since 2014’s Singles. 2014 was something of a breakthrough for the 11-year-old synthpop band: a passionate, amazing Late Show With Letterman performance of their single “Seasons (Waiting on You)” went viral, introducing millions of people to the band’s brand of honest, open-hearted longing.

“The Far Field” refines and builds on the breakthroughs of their 2014 album Singles, bursting with undeniable hooks and disarmingly honest lyrics written by Samuel T. Herring (vocals, lyrics), William Cashion (bass, guitars) and Gerrit Welmers (keyboards, programming).

Across “The Far Field”’s twelve chest-pounding love songs and odes to the road, Future Islands brilliantly expresses the band’s central themes they’ve been exploring for the last decade: that there is power in emotional vulnerability, that one can find a way to laugh and cry in the same breath – and be stronger for it.

The Far Field is something of their celebrity album. It was recorded in Los Angeles at Sunset Sound, where the Beach Boys and Prince have recorded. Blondie’s Debbie Harry features in late-LP track “Shadows”. The album was produced with indie super-producer John Congleton (St. Vincent, David Byrne, Sleater-Kinney, Cloud Nothings) and will (finally!) feature live drums. You can listen to their efforts on first single “Ran”,

Future Islands newest album, Singles, saw the band reaching a much larger audience, thanks in part to its meme-creating network television debut on The Late Show With David Letterman. The album’s release comes several years after Future Islands relocated from North Carolina to Baltimore,

Watch ‘Road Dawgs,’ A Mini-Documentary About Future Islands

This was  Future Islands year. After touring hard for eight years and recording four albums, they finally broke through. The latest album, Singles, came out in March 2015. It is a well-loved and grand look at the dramatic and synthy side of this Baltimore band, though it may have been Sam Herring’s rubbery and thrusting dance on TV that got people listening.

Now they’re touring the world with massive crowds hearing these heartfelt tunes and trying to stay true to their humble selves. This short film  Road Dawgs ,directed by Jay Buim,  who also did the “Seasons (Waiting On You)” video, is a glimpse at a band who now knows things have changed but is trying to keep it real.

This year in the life of Future Islands. The album ‘Singles’ is out now,

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Du Blonde has enlisted the help of Future Islands enigmatic frontman Samuel T. Herring for new single “Mind Is On My Mind”.

The track features on Du Blonde‘s first album as Du Blonde – previously, who went under the name of Beth Jeans Houghton – which is monikered Welcome Back To Milk. Swanning away from the garage-y tones of lead single “Black Flag”, Blonde x Herring spiral towards surf-noir as if composing the theme for a James Bond flick set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland.

Speaking about writing the cut, Blonde said: “I wrote ‘Mind Is On My Mind’ on the back of a motorbike riding down the Pacific Coast Highway in LA and had to remember it all the way from Topanga to Malibu. I was interested at the time in writing songs with no repeating sections, but rather a succession of acts. A couple of months later, Sam and I took a trip out to the desert and came back to LA to make some music. I played him the track and he got in the booth and ad-libbed his lyrics over the instrumentation. He was done in like one or two takes. When I was back in London I’d become obsessed with these Middle Eastern and Greek guitar scales and I added the lead guitar in the outro as a contrast to Sam’s vocals.”

Welcome Back To Milk is released 18th May by Mute Records, check out these UK Dates

June

3 – BRIGHTON GREEN DOOR STORE
4 – LONDON 100 CLUB
5 – LEEDS BRUDENELL SOCIAL CLUB
6 – BRISTOL LOUISIANA
7 – NOTTINGHAM THE BODEGA
9 – MANCHESTER DEAF INSTITUTE
10 – GLASGOW BROADCAST
11 – NEWCASTLE THE CLUNY

July

24 – THIRSK, DEER SHED FESTIVAL

Future Islands is a synthpop band based in Baltimore, Maryland, signed to the label 4AD The band is composed of Gerrit Welmers (keyboards and programming), William Cashion (bass, acoustic and electric guitars), and Samuel T. Herring (lyrics and vocals). Future Islands formed in January of 2006 in Greenville, North Carolina. this is a slowed down remix changing the feel of the song completely.

 

Future Islands‘ 4AD Session, featuring tracks from their album ‘Singles
Continuing a hugely successful year for the Synth Pop band Future Islands, the band are both premiering their five-track 4AD Session.
Filmed in London while recently on tour here, Future Islands have enlisted a string quartet and brass section for their Session, performing five album cuts – ‘Sun In The Morning’, ‘Doves’, ‘Seasons (Waiting On You)’, ‘Light House’ and ‘A Song For Our Grandfathers’. You can watch on the band’s YouTube channel here or in the player below.

Having recently announced their biggest US headlining shows to date next January in New York (Terminal 5), Boston (Royale) and Philadelphia (Union Transfer), they are today adding extra shows at each venue after all three sold out in record time.

They have also just added an extra date at London’s Roundhouse next March after the first date sold out quickly too.

Future Islands are Samuel T. Herring on vocals,William Cashion on bass and Gerrit Welmers keyboards, Mike Lowry – drums,Chris Tipton – guitar.

Future Islands performed their classic hit song last night on Jools Holland show last night with the amazing dancing of frontman Samuel T Herring, a performance very similar to the appearance on Letterman Show earlier this year.

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Seems like this will be the cover song of the summer Slow club do a slower version and a sterling job on such a great song