Posts Tagged ‘Covers’

“Georgia Blue” is a labour of love. On election day 2020, when I saw that there was a good chance the state of Georgia might go blue, I came up with an idea: to record an album of Georgia-related songs as a thank you to the state and donate the money to a Georgia based non-profit organization.

I will admit my motivations were a bit selfish. For years, I’ve been looking for an excuse to record these songs with my band and some friends. The songs on this album are some of my favorite Georgia-related songs, but the track-list is not meant to be comprehensive. I would love to cover Outkast and 2 Chainz, but I don’t think the finished product would be very good. We’re a rock band, so we covered rock songs. We have roots in blues and R&B, so we enlisted some brilliant artists to help us pull off songs by Precious Bryant, James Brown, and Gladys Knight.

My favourite part of the “Georgia Blue” recording process was having the opportunity to work with these very special artists, and I thank them: Amanda Shires, Brittney Spencer, Adia Victoria, Brandi Carlile, Julien Baker, Béla Fleck, Chris Thile, Steve Gorman, Peter Levin, and John Paul White.

Jason Isbell – Vocals, Guitar
Amanda Shires – Fiddle, Vocals
Jimbo Hart – Bass, Vocals
Sadler Vaden – Guitar, Vocals
Chad Gamble – Drums, Vocals
Derry deBorja – Keys, Vocals

I hope you enjoy listening to these recordings as much as we enjoyed making them. Keep listening to good music and fighting the good fight.

Jason Isbell 

Releases October 15th, 2021

You may recall that Fruit Bats covered Smashing Pumpkins’ classic second album, “Siamese Dream“, in full last year for the Sounds Delicous collective , and that’s now been shared to streaming services. Eric D. Johnson gives the alt-rock classic a decidedly Fruit Bats spin. He talks a little about the album and his version:

In 1993, I was the prime age to be swept up in alternative radio. But truth be told, while I loved Nirvana and Jane’s Addiction, in my heart I was still secretly wearing a hole in my cassette copy of Steve Miller Band’s Greatest Hits 1974-78. Somehow, Smashing Pumpkins spoke to all sides of me angsty on the surface but really filled with a kind of Midwest mysticism that spoke directly to my 17-year-old-kid-from-Illinois brain. It’s also the first tape I ever listened to while driving a long distance alone. I’m pretty sure my version of this album is based on subconscious memories of that drive.

I played all the instruments on this. And no, of course I’m not going to be able to recreate Billy Corgan’s crushing, epic guitar tone. Nor could I dream of touching Jimmy Chamberlin’s floaty (yet ever-shredding) drumming. This version is all about hazy memories for me, and how Corgan’s brilliant pop hooks can travel through time and exist in any possible instrumental configuration.

Fruit Bats are playing Newport Folk Festival this weekend, and they’ve just announced a few October 2021 dates, They’ll be back in for a more extensive 2022 tour 

Fruit Bats released “The Pet Parade” earlier this year and are also contributing to the upcoming Neal Casal tribute box set.

FRUIT BATS have digitally released their full-album cover of Siamese Dream by Smashing Pumpkins! Recorded between the albums “The Pet Parade” and “Gold Past Life” and originally released on vinyl last summer via Turntable Kitchen, the Fruit Bats version of Siamese Dream can now be heard in full on your stream or purchased in the Merge Records store.
“Johnson navigates the songs with intimacy while freely straying from the record’s blueprint. In the original, high drama and explosive washes of guitars greet listeners at every turn. Muting both elements, Johnson strips the songs of their grandeur and amplifies their air of loneliness. The effect is poignant, as if the singer is communing with his younger self.” —New Yorker

Released July 23rd, 2021

There are a few ups and downs here, like in every Springsteen tribute, but I think that Glory Days as a pub singing song is simply genius!.

It’s a mouthful of a title for a mouthful of an album. At a colossal 38 tracks, Play Some Pool… is more of a Now That’s What We Call Broooce. And helpfully there’s nary a part of the Bruce canon untouched for any long term fan who wishes to be offended/ delighted by the homages contained herein.

Usually found in order of importance to an artist’s reputation beneath live albums and remix compilations, tribute albums are notoriously iffy affairs at the best of times. Lots of phoned-in performances by big(ish) names, or just downright weird-bordering-on-insulting pastiches, as anyone who has sat through one will attest.

Despite no actual presence of recent Bruce torchbearers such as The Hold Steady or The Gaslight Anthem, all manner of semi-known indie herberts line up to doff a cap. Probably the best known acts here concern fans of Art Brut – singer Eddie Argos fronts Glam Chops’ version of “Born In The USA” (done, as you’d imagine, in the style of the Glitter Band fronted by Mark E Smith, all deeply unsober at a kebab house) and ex-Hefner youngster Darren Hayman.

Highlights? The splendid Butcher Boy’s delicate reading of Streets Of Philadelphia; Help Stamp Out Loneliness’ gorgeously electro I’m On Fire; School’s C86-y take on Hungry Heart; ‘Allo Darlin”s rippling indie makeover of Atlantic City and the superbly named Swedish Chef’s glistening weaklingness take on Used Cars. Unfortunately Linda Black Bear’s banjo-assisted version of Born To Run sounds like Neil Young at a music workshop, and The WinterSleep’s half awake meander through Dancing In The Dark doesn’t really add anything to your life, other than sucking away what seems like two hours.

There’s actually nothing completely horrendous on here, although the chances of you wanting to sit through it all again are slim. Instead there’s a good dozen or so tracks here to be selected by everyone, Springsteen fan or not.

Originally Released September 23rd, 2009

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Over two nights at the Royal Dramaten Theatre in Stockholm in March 2017, Swedish indie/folk act First Aid Kit paid tribute to the songs and poetry of Leonard Cohen. They did so with an ambitious theatrical staging that involved guest actors and artists, and eight-piece band with strings and a twenty-piece choir. ‘Who By Fire’, a double-LP live album, commemorates those two evenings. there’s a long history of covers of leonard cohen tracks showing just how incredible the canadian’s song writing was. First Aid Kit are the latest to breathe new life into his songs on this “theatrical staging” of his songs, poems and letters. we can think of few better people to take on his unparalleled canon than the Swedish duo – this will be stunning. that (famous) blue (raincoat) wax looks lush too!

First Aid Kit have announced that they’ll be releasing a live tribute album to Leonard Cohen, originally performed across two nights. Made up of 20 tracks of songs, poems, and letters, the duo were joined by Swedish guest artists, an 8 person band & strings, two actors, as well as a 20+ person choir on two of the songs. Conceived and anchored by First Aid Kit, the band are joined by an array of guest artists, two actors, an 8 member band and strings and on two songs a 20 strong choir. an incredibly ambitious undertaking, they selected and sequenced all of the material performed and collaborated with the theatre and their music director to stage and orchestrate the show.

Speaking today about Who By Fire, the Söderberg sisters say: “We recently listened back to this concert and realized that this was something out of the ordinary for us. It was a challenge to create a performance that wasn’t centered around First Aid Kit songs. It was something we’d never done before, but everything came together so well. Dwelling deeply into Cohen’s world was a pleasure, he was so prolific as both a poet and a songwriter, and everything he ever put out held a very strong standard. He cared immensely for his work. The band, the guest artists, the atmosphere on stage…everyone had a great passion and it felt magical. This is definitely a record that is best enjoyed listening to back-to-back with no interruptions. Allow yourself to just disappear into Cohen’s world for a little while.

“We decided not to edit any of the performances. The flaws are part of the live experience. In a time when you sadly can’t go to an actual physical live show, you can listen to this and imagine you were there…”

Who By Fire is Swedish sister duo First Aid Kit’s tribute to Leonard Cohen. Recorded live, they were joined by an array of fellow Swedish guest artists, an eight-person band & strings, two actors, as well as a 20+ person choir on two of the songs. Double indie shop exclusive LP pressing on Blue vinyl.

‘Who By Fire’ Tracklisting:
1. Tired (First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist)
2. Suzanne (First Aid Kit)
3. Sisters of Mercy (First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist)
4. Who by Fire / As The Mist Leaves No Scar (First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist)
5. Twelve O’Clock Chant (First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist)
6. Everybody Knows (Frida Hyvönen, First Aid Kit)
7. Avalanche (Loney Dear)
8. The Future (Maia Hansson-Bergqvist, First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani)
9. Chelsea Hotel No.5 (Jesper Lindell, First Aid Kit)
10. You Want It Darker (First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist)
11. If It Be Your Will (First Aid Kit)
12. The Asthmatic (Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist, First Aid Kit)
13. Famous Blue Raincoat / Anthem (Maja Francis, First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani)
14. Show Me The Place (Jesper Lindell, First Aid Kit)
15. Hallelujah (Annika Norlin, First Aid Kit)
16. Prayer for Messiah (Klara Söderberg)
17. Bird on the Wire (First Aid Kit )
18. Who by Fire (Reprise) / Letter to Marianne (First Aid Kit, Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist)
19. So Long Marianne (First Aid Kit, Frida Hyvönen, Loney Dear, Jesper Lindell, Annika Norlin, Maja Francis, Nina Zanjani, Maia Hansson-Bergqvist)
20. You’d Sing Too (Johanna Söderberg)

 

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Whatever your opinion on Radiohead’s 1995 album ‘The Bends’, it’s impossible to deny it’s cultural importance, responsible for inspiring a generation of musicians. Tackling classics of the genre is always fraught with challenges, and it’s a bold move for an artist who’s really only setting out on a new path of their own.

However, British singer Rosie Carney does exactly that, just a year after releasing her debut album ‘Bare’. Initially, it’s as if you’re hearing a ghostly impression of the original – recognisable and familiar, but still somewhat impalpable – akin to retrieving an old memory buried deep inside your hippocampus. With repeated listens, however, the full memory is easier to grasp, sharper and brighter each time.

Carney somehow manages to capture the raw anguish that pulses throughout much of The Bends but avoids falling into the trap of sounding unnecessarily tragic. Her version of “High and Dry” remains as stripped back as the original, but her lilting folk and subtle harmonies add a warmth that’s difficult to characterise.

For an album that has been charged with feeling a little bit heavy in places, Carney does a striking job of making the whole record surprisingly easy to listen to. “Fake Plastic Trees” gives way to “Bones” which cedes to “(Nice Dream)” as smoothly as the streams that course down the hills around the County Donegal coastline that Carney calls home flow into the sea.

There are a couple of reinventions, such as the vocoder driven “Sulk” and the softer, more dreamlike ‘Black Star’ but really the whole album is a testament to both Radiohead and Carney together. It’s proof of the old adage that a good song is only really a good song if it still sounds that way when everything is stripped back and just an acoustic guitar and vocals remain. Sure, there might be some keys and strings added here too, but they’re subtle and do nothing to detract from the main focus on each track.

As bolds move go, this is one that pays off. By treading where others might not dare Carney has pulled off a stunning coup that not only confirms her as a talented musician in her own right, but one that’s capable of holding a light to giants of the game.

Born in Hampshire, Rosie Carney moved to Donegal at the age of 10. She writes hauntingly beautiful tunes that have earned her millions of streams, and recently covered Radiohead’s classic album The Bends to gorgeous effect. She’s about to feature alongside Julian Stone and Lucy Rose on the new LP from Australian folk-rockers The Paper Kites, who recently hit their billionth stream.

Rosie Carney ‘The Bends’ out now on @Color Study, Release date: 11th December 2020.

Stephen Fain Earle (born January 17th, 1955) an American rock, country and folk singer-songwriter, record producer, author and actor. Earle began his career as a songwriter in Nashville and released his first EP in 1982. He grew up near San Antonio, Texas, and began learning the guitar at age 11. His breakthrough album was the 1986 album “Guitar Town”. Since then Earle has released 16 other studio albums and received three Grammy awards. His songs have been recorded by Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Travis Tritt, Vince Gill, Shawn Colvin and Emmylou Harris. He has appeared in film and television, and has written a novel, a play, and a book of short stories.  These are the best interpretations we can find of Steve Earle singing Bob Dylan’s songs.

“Señor (Tales of Yankee Power)”

Steve Earle with Lucia Micarelli  “One More Cup of Coffee (Valley Below)” possibily the best Bob Dylan cover ever, such passion and yearning in every line. When Dylan wrote ‘to the valley below’ it was deliberate, he took a prosaic sentence, one more cup of coffee before I go and changed it to a biblical epic with that line,

Steve Earle – guitar, vocal Lucia Micarelli – violin, vocal, From “Chimes of Freedom”: Songs of Bob Dylan Honouring 50 Years of Amnesty International –

“My Back Pages”

It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry”,

Fantastic end to the 1996 live MTV show called “To Hell and Back” of Steve Earle performing with the best Dukes line up and the awesome Custer on drums. With a song written by Bob Dylan that was originally released on his seminal album “Highway 61 Revisited”, and also included on the compilation album Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits 2 that was released in Europe.

“Masters of War” Musician Steve Earle sings Bob Dylan’s “Master’s of War.” Part of a reading from Voices of a People’s History of the United States (Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove,) Berkeley, California on November 11th, 2006.

Steve Earle: “Was Townes Van Zandt Better Than Bob Dylan?…I’m kinda famous for something I said…I was asked for a sticker for a Townes record that came out in the 80s, I said, Townes Van Zandt is the best songwriter in the world and I’ll stand on Bob Dylan’s coffee table in my cowboy-boots and say that. 
It wasn’t that I thought that Townes was better than Bob Dylan. I just knew that Townes really needed the help more.”

Well, I love both Van Zandt and Dylan, and so does Steve Earle. He has done songs by both on several occasions, and he did an entire album with Townes Van Zandt songs. But Steve Earle is the perfect choice to sing any Dylan song.

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Surprise-release and “personally selected and sequenced to celebrate artists and songs that inspired him,” the new Chris Cornell album of cover versions is truly the gift that continues to give. A passionate vocalist with a famed four-octave range and a super alt-rock pedigree of time spent in Soundgarden and Audioslave (to say nothing of a series of solo albums invested in acoustic pop and nu-soul), having Cornell tracing over familiar lines such as those laid down by songwriters like John Lennon or interpreters such as Janis Joplin is to work the magic of true transformation.

What’s nice about “No One Sings Like You Anymore” is that this is not a portrait of the vein-popping Cornell screeching his way through a rager such as “Spoonman.” The ten tunes here are subtly sung numbers soft and poignant—focused on often-unsuspectingly melodic gems (like Guns N’ Roses’ “Patience,” done here as a dramatic mid-tempo ballad) with a quieter ensemble as backing. Not that he ever had to fight to be heard over Kim Thayil’s guitar army of lace and metal, Cornell could always sing loud enough to beat the band. On No One Sings Like You Anymore it’s clear—he doesn’t have to tangle in battle, and he sounded as if he was loving that ease of motion.

While Prince’s “Nothing Compares 2 U” is played and sung like the grooviest chamber soul with a few twists and turns for rapt theatricality, Lennon’s latter-day “Watching the Wheels” is done humbly and straight, reverent to the ex-Beatle’s longing for normalcy, with just a supple kick to remind you of Cornell’s heft. Harry Nilsson’s riff-happy “Jump Into the Fire,” a favourite rocking cover of Cornell’s Temple of the Dog, is given an oddball, epic French horn break in its bridge. 

If you want more epic, Lorraine Ellison’s “Stay With Me Baby,” done here with a souped-up organ whirring below him, allows Cornell to dip, dive, swoop, and soar without screeching. This is the true high point of the package, and one familiar to those (few) fans of Martin Scorsese’s HBO show Vinyl. If you want another epic with a sympathetic horn line, “You Don’t Know Nothing About Love” from songwriter/producer Jerry Ragovoy and nearly forgotten R&B vocalist Carl Hall—is Cornell’s passionate passageway into ragged vocal display.

Ragovoy and Mort Shuman’s bluesy “Get It While You Can,” scuffed up and scowled over by Janis Joplin, is made into a synth-pop track for Cornell to do his own gruff and soulful thing over. Same with Jeff Lynne’s slick, bluesy “Showdown.” Cornell and his band give the track an electro sheen and rhythmic tick, along with some noisy guitar. With so many colours and moods for Cornell to rise through, it’s such a damned shame he didn’t stick around to see this arc of his life, particulary this chapter and verse of his career.

Marika Hackman Covers

Marika Hackman returns with an album “Covers”, a darkly beautiful, self-produced new album which showcases a more vulnerable side, available on November 13th. Accompanying the news, Marika has shared her version of Grimes’ single “Realiti” plus details of a NoonChorus live stream with her full band that will take place on album release day.

During the extended stay-at-home order of the last few months, Marika felt that creating a covers record was a way of exploring new sound ideas and expressing herself without having the pressure of the blank page. She recorded and produced “Covers” between home and her parents’ house, then got the legendary David Wrench (Frank Ocean, The xx, Let’s Eat Grandma) to mix it. David also co-produced her excellent 2019 record Any Human Friend. In contrast to her last two albums (including 2017’s I’m Not Your Man), this collection of songs is more akin in tone and feel to her debut We Slept At Last, with a darker and more introspective sound.

On Covers, we hear Marika’s emotive voice set against sparse arrangements of guitars and strings with the occasional synth or scattered drum groove. Breathing new life into the songs she’s chosen, Marika reimagines work by some of the world’s most beloved artists such as Radiohead, Grimes and Elliott Smith. It’s a suitably varied collection, but Marika’s intimate delivery and soft, nuanced and atmospheric touch to production, thread them all together effortlessly. Marika explains how she came to choose the material: “When it comes to covers, I like to pick songs which I have been listening to obsessively for a while. It gives me a natural understanding of the music, and lets me be more innovative with how I transform it.”

First single “Realiti” is a stripped back piano and guitar based version of the Grimes classic from her most celebrated album Art Angels. Marika’s take is a total reinvention and yet it feels wholly her own. Muna’s “Pink Light” from their 2019 record Saves The World is a slice of dark pop, reminiscent of The Cure. In Marika’s hands, it’s a remarkably seamless switch-up to convert these into slower, brooding soft jams. Marika’s version of Air’s “Playground Love” is one of the highlights, taken from the soundtrack the group composed for Sofia Coppola’s coming of age The Virgin Suicides, the result being a moodier, disorientating reworking of a classic modern moment.

Final track “All Night” sees Marika tackling one of the standouts from Beyonce’s Grammy-nominated Lemonade. Again, Marika flips the song on its head. Joined by a choir of stacked vocal harmonies, Marika’s voice transcends to conjure a deep emotional resonance. Adventurous and versatile, Covers continues Marika’s lineage in turning each body of work into a new take and perspective on her creative vision. She twists and turns, always surprises, and is never afraid to wear her heart on her sleeve. It remains anyone’s guess to imagine where she will head next.

Tickets are for a NoonChorus performance on Friday, November 13th at 6pm PST / 9pm EST. A viewing code will be sent to you from Noonchorus (help@noonchorus.com) with seven days to go to the show, and emailed again with a reminder on the day of the show. If you haven’t received your code in the 48 hours before the show, please contact help@noonchorus.com. The tickets and bundles will only be available here until Friday 6th November, after which tickets for the livestream will exclusively be available from noonchorus.com

In the off chance you haven’t given her “Realiti” cover a listen, here’s what you’re missing: “… a new take on ‘Realiti’ by Grimes, inverting Claire Boucher’s electronic template for some introspective acoustic balladry.” Clash

“Grimes gets the ethereal folk treatment with Hackman’s contemplative, beautiful version of ‘Realiti’,” – Gigwise

During the extended stay-at-home order of the last few months, Marika Hackman felt that creating a covers record was a way of exploring new sound ideas and expressing herself without having the pressure of the blank page. She recorded and produced “Covers” between home and her parents’ house, then got the legendary David Wrench (Frank Ocean, The xx, Let’s Eat Grandma) to mix it. David also co-produced her excellent 2019 record Any Human Friend. In contrast to her last two albums (including 2017’s I’m Not Your Man), this collection of songs is more akin in tone and feel to her debut We Slept At Last, with a darker and more introspective sound. On Covers, we hear Marika’s emotive voice set against sparse arrangements of guitars and strings with the occasional synth or scattered drum groove.

Breathing new life into the songs she’s chosen, Marika reimagines work by some of the world’s most beloved artists such as Radiohead, Grimes and Elliott Smith. It’s a suitably varied collection, but Marika’s intimate delivery and soft, nuanced and atmospheric touch to production, thread them all together effortlessly.

Marika explains how she came to choose the material: “When it comes to covers, I like to pick songs which I have been listening to obsessively for a while. It gives me a natural understanding of the music, and lets me be more innovative with how I transform it.”

First single “Realiti” is a stripped back piano and guitar based version of the Grimes classic from her most celebrated album Art Angels. Marika’s take is a total reinvention and yet it feels wholly her own. Muna’s “Pink Light” from their 2019 record Saves The World is a slice of dark pop, reminiscent of The Cure. In Marika’s hands, it’s a remarkably seamless switch-up to convert these into slower, brooding soft jams. Marika’s version of Air’s “Playground Love” is one of the highlights, taken from the soundtrack the group composed for Sofia Coppola’s coming of age The Virgin Suicides, the result being a moodier, disorientating reworking of a classic modern moment.

Final track “All Night” sees Marika tackling one of the standouts from Beyonce’s Grammy-nominated Lemonade. Again, Marika flips the song on its head. Joined by a choir of stacked vocal harmonies, Marika’s voice transcends to conjure a deep emotional resonance.

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Adventurous and versatile, Covers continues Marika’s lineage in turning each body of work into a new take and perspective on her creative vision. She twists and turns, always surprises, and is never afraid to wear her heart on her sleeve. It remains anyone’s guess to imagine where she will head next.

Releases November 13th, 2020

2020 Sub Pop Records

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In March 2020, the Nashville-based artist experienced the devastating tornado that tore through much of East Nashville, followed by the global pandemic. Tuttle, who grew up in California and has toured as a solo artist for years, suddenly found herself—along with the rest of the musician community—sheltering at home. She found solace in revisiting favourite songs from throughout her life in an attempt to “remind myself why I love music.” She conceptualized an idea for a record with renowned LA producer Tony Berg (Phoebe Bridgers, Andrew Bird) to be recorded over 2,000 miles apart.

Molly Tuttle’s new covers album, “But I’d Rather Be With You”, is out August 28th and has her taking on songs by The National, Arthur Russell, Karen Dalton, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Harry Styles, Cat Stevens and more. Here’s her cover of Rancid’s “Olympia, Washington,” which she’s reworked into a twangy rocker. “I used to listen to Rancid and Operation Ivy all the time as an angsty 7th grader, and a couple of friends and I spent many hours learning their songs to perform at our school concerts,” says Tuttle. “Years later, I still love these songs!! When I played a show in Olympia, WA last fall this song was stuck in my head all day so we learned it at sound check and played it in the show. Then in December I showed it to Ketch Secor and we played it on our duo tour — he also sang harmony on this track and sounds terrific.

This song is so good and just makes me super happy for unexplainable reasons.”

From Molly Tuttle’s upcoming covers album “…But I’d Rather Be With You” available August 28th, 2020.


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