Posts Tagged ‘Mike Campbell’

San Francisco Ca - Tom Petty at Bay Area Music Awards 1998 at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco California On March 7 1998 Usa Oakland1998 Bay Area Music Awards

The new Tom Petty box set after a long time waiting is finally getting a release, Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell tells us that the group hopes to release a live set commemorating their 1997 residency at the Fillmore in San Francisco. They played 20 sold-out shows at the historic theatre in January and February of that year, radically changing the setlist each night. In 2009, seven songs from the Fillmore run were released on the Live Anthology compilation, but that was just a tiny sampling of their total collection.

“For me, that was almost the pinnacle of the band just being totally spontaneous night to night to night,” says Campbell. “We might throw in a Grateful Dead song that we just learned that afternoon. We recorded every show and we had guest artists from Bo Diddley to Roger McGuinn to John Lee Hooker. And I know, in my memory of those 20 nights, there’s an amazing album in there.”

Tom Petty estate finally release an expanded edition of his 1995 LP solo “Wildflowers”. Petty had said  that he wanted to take the Heartbreakers and whoever else to reproduce every sound in a big way,” of that album. That album was really about sound in a big way. The plan was to go out there and perform the entire album as it was originally conceived with all of the songs.”

“Wildflowers” was initially envisioned as a double album, but was ultimately pared down to 15 songs on a single CD release. It became one of the most successful records of his career, with singles “You Don’t Know How It Feels,” “You Wreck Me” and “It’s Good To Be King” all getting extensive radio play. For years, Petty has been contemplating assembling the unreleased material into a deluxe package. The Super Deluxe Edition of the set features 70 tracks, spread out over five CDs, with nine songs that have never been released plus 34 alternate versions.

Curated by Tom’s daughters, Adria and Annakim Petty and his wife Dana Petty. A 2-CD set includes 25 songs, with ten previously unreleased cuts. A top of the line Super Deluxe Edition is a sprawling package available in a 5-CD or 9-LP 180g vinyl.

In addition to the original LP, the box contains a disc titled All the Rest that includes 10 outtakes from the sessions, five of which have never been heard. The third disc is comprised of 15 Petty home demos, with three of its 15 songs unreleased. The fourth CD consists of live versions of 14 songs recorded between 1995 and 2017, 12 available for the first time. The fifth disc, Finding Wallflowers, consists of 16 alternate studio versions.

“I think I put four of the [Wildflowers outtakes] on the She’s The One soundtrack just to fill out the album,” says Tom Petty. “But they were very hastily mixed. Take ‘Climb That Hill.’ There’s a version of that on She’s The One, but the Wildflowers one I think is extremely better. ‘Hung Up And Overdue’ is another one remixed and it turned into an epic. Carl Wilson [of the Beach Boys] and [Heartbreakers bassist] Howie Epstein singing quite a bit of harmony that didn’t come through on the original. Then again, there’s probably six songs that nobody has heard. There’s 11 or 12 [new] songs on the album. I think people are going to like it a lot. I like it a lot.”

The new version of Wildflowers will be released. “At one point the label really just wanted to put it out as a standalone album, And then there’s the point of view where they want to put both records together. There’s also the point of view that wants the box set with all the demos and all that.

The Wildflowers box set has been in the works for quite a long time, something that Petty frequently spoke of in his final years. The 1994 album was originally envisioned as a two-disc set, meaning many songs got cut for space when it was truncated. A sweet, tender melodic ballad opens Tom Petty’s acclaimed 1994 album Wildflowers. The title track’s initial chorus reveals a simple desire: freedom.

You belong among the wildflowers / You belong in a boat out at sea / Sail away, kill off the hours / You belong somewhere you feel free.”

“I swear to god it’s all ad-lib from the word ‘go,’’ Petty told Paul Zollo in his 2005 book, Conversations with Tom Petty. “I turned on my tape deck, picked up my acoustic guitar, took a breath and played that from start to finish. And then sat back and went ‘Wow, what did I just do?’ And I listened to it. I didn’t change a word. Everything was just right there, off the top of my head. It’s a very sweet song. It’s got really good intentions.” Sonically, “Wildflowers” came from a different world than much of Petty’s work from the ’80s. There are no drums on the track at all, and the song features little more than a jangly acoustic guitar, piano, a spot or two of harmony and Petty’s pure vocals. Turning instead to a more stripped-down, raw and natural approach, he entered the studio with his bandmates from the Heartbreakers, unsure exactly of what the result would be. “Wildflowers” arrived like a breath of fresh air, or as Petty put it, a “stream of consciousness.”

“I actually only spent three and a half minutes on that whole song,” the rocker confessed to Zollo. “So I’d come back for days playing that tape, thinking there must be something wrong here because this just came too easy. And then I realized that there’s probably nothing wrong at all.”

Producer Rick Rubin was also taken aback by the flow of material pouring out of Petty.

“One day, between cassette recordings of songs he was working on, he began strumming the guitar,” said Rubin . “After a couple of minutes of strumming chords, he played me an intricate new song complete with lyrics and story. I asked him what it was about. He said he didn’t know, it just came out. He had written it, or more like channelled it, in that very moment. He didn’t know what it was about or what the inspiration was. It arrived fully formed. It was breath-taking.”

Though Rubin couldn’t remember the exact song Petty played — it could very well have been “Wildflowers” — the producer was amazed by the the ease with which Petty put tunes together. Rubin, also enamoured with the songwriting from Full Moon Fever (1989), would go on to produce the entire Wildflowers record.

“When we first met, I was impressed with his dedication to writing,” the producer recalled. “He wrote constantly and called me to come and hear new songs often. There is a poetry about them that spoke to me.” But that poetry wasn’t immediately clear to Petty when he wrote “Wildflowers,” and the direction the song was taking him was unclear, though he knew his crumbling marriage was likely playing a part.

“I’ve read that Echo is my ‘divorce album’, but Wildflowers is the divorce album,” Petty told biographer Warren Zanes in the 2015 book, Petty: The Biography. “That’s me getting ready to leave. I don’t even know how conscious I was of it when I was writing it. I don’t go into this stuff with elaborate plans. But I’m positive that’s what Wildflowers is. It just took me getting up the guts to leave this huge empire that we had built, to walk out.” When the title track came tumbling out of his head, Petty didn’t recognize his subject straight away. His therapist asked him who the song was about.

“I told him I wasn’t sure,” the musician recalled to Zanes. “And then he said ‘I know. The song is about you. That’s you singing to yourself what you needed to hear.’” It appeared the freedom the subject was seeking was Petty’s to find. Whatever had been bottled up inside had come out onto the page and had become an unforgettable three minute song about love and liberation. “It kind of knocked me back,” Petty admitted. “But I realized he was right. It was me singing to me.”

Petty had seen the Rolling Stones play Sticky Fingers at the Fonda Theatrer in Los Angeles and noticed they played it completely out of sequence. “Single album concerts often don’t scan right for a concert,” he said. “But with the amount of material I had for the Wildflowers double album, I think I’ve got enough tempos and types of songs that I could do a live show … And it’ll be fun for the audience since there’s a bunch of songs they’ll know.

The album, which features hits like You Don’t Know How It Feels,” “You Wreck Me” and “It’s Good To Be King,” has been due an extensive re-release.

Now that he’s gone, his former collaborators are determined to see the projection to fruition. “I see that in the cards,” says producer Ryan Ulyate. “It’s going to be fantastic.” There’s also talk of deluxe editions of key albums from Petty’s catalogue. “If there’s a market for something like that,” says Campbell, “we’ll do it.”

Wildflowers & All The Rest—Super Deluxe Edition: A 5-CD and 9-LP 180g Direct to Consumer, Limited Edition set that features 70 tracks, nine unreleased songs and 34 unreleased versions. Includes Rick Rubin introduction, David Fricke essay, track-by-track for all music and lyrics to all the songs on Wildflowers and All The Rest. This set also comes with a hardbound book, cloth patch of Wildflowers logo, sticker of Wildflowers logo, replica of “Dogs with Wings” tour program (the 1995 Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers tour), hand-written 4-song lyric reprints in vellum envelope, a litho of new and exclusive art by Blaze Ben Brooks for the song “Only A Broken Heart,” and a (numbered) Certificate of Authenticity.

The sad 2017 demise of Tom Petty has increased the interest in this renowned rocker. Petty had just clocked up forty years of success before the cruel hand of fate robbed the world of his prestigious talent. A seventies Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers released a dynamic debut album that had this American band setting a new template. Not quite old school but not quite new wave Petty and his posse wrote some good tunes which were radio friendly with an edge. Other top tunes followed but as regards a long player I did not go any further.

However, on the back of a golden yesteryear era, it is time to take further stock of a rock n roll icon. This 16 track, 72 minute long live set picks up on a 1989 US FM Broadcast. Petty is the main songwriter – but, there are allegiances with Mike Campbell, Jeff Lynne and Dave Stewart in different formats across half a dozen of the songs, a Benmont Tench tune and there is also a Chuck Berry cover. This 101% music maverick offers stage stamina and both quantity and quality. On a selfish note, Breakdown from the fresher release is present and that means an extra credit – and, an alternative approach to the sonic sculptures adds extra spice. This is a great FM recording from North Carolina featuring some of the new songs from both “Let Me Up” and “Full Moon Fever”, and of special note is the middle section with new acoustic renditions of ‘Even the Losers’, ‘Listen to Her Heart’, and the rarely subsequently played ‘Face in the Crowd’ (in an absolutely beautiful version). Other highlights are the rarely performed ‘Something Big’ from “Hard Promises” and a new, more rockin’ arrangement of ‘Don’t Come Around Here No More’.

Tom Petty made a significant contribution to rock n roll across five decades and in no manner was it a petty one! This 2018 “Strange Behaviour” set has a sadly lost legend breaking hearts and setting standards. Great quality sound and some different takes on certain songs, worth it for the version of “A Face in the Crowd” on its own. The original source on this was Westwood One Superstars In Concert. This was part of the Strange BehaviourTour, which ran from July to September, 1989 in the U.S., and this was the only date in North Carolina. The next leg of the tour continued in January-March of 1990,

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers – Chapel Hill, NC – September 13th, 1989

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Ex Heartbreakers and Fleetwood Mac guitarist Mike Campbell is turning his attention to his band the Dirty Knobs. The group of Los Angeles-based musicians, led by the Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers guitarist, is releasing their debut album “Wreckless Abandon” on March 20th.

Mike Campbell formed the Dirty Knobs 15 years ago, but they have never gigged outside of Los Angeles or released an album. In addition to Campbell, the group features singer-guitarist Jason Sinay, bassist Lance Morrison and drummer Matt Laug.

“Over the years, The Knobs became an outlet for me to play some of the other songs I was writing,” Campbell says in a statement, “and to keep the creative juices flowing in between working on albums and tours with Tom and The Heartbreakers.”

Background Vocals: George Drakoulias Background Vocals: Jason Sinay Bass: Lance Morrison Drums, Percussion: Matt Laug Keyboards, Percussion, Lead Vocals: Mike Campbell

Composer: Mike Campbell

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Fleetwood Mac debuted their new revamped lineup by performing “The Chain” and “Gypsy” on Wednesday’s edition of The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

The televised appearance marked the longtime band’s first time playing live alongside guitarists Mike Campbell, formerly of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Crowded House’s Neil Finn, both of whom stepped in after Fleetwood Mac fired Lindsey Buckingham last April.

Both guitarists featured prominently in the performances, flanking to the left and right of Stevie Nicks; on both “The Chain” and “Gypsy,” Finn handled the vocal parts previously sung by Buckingham, particularly on “The Chain,” where Finn and Nicks showcased their budding vocal chemistry.

They played two classic songs, “The Chain” and “Gypsy,” which you can watch below.

Host Ellen DeGeneres introduced the group by saying that it’s sold more than 100 million albums and calling Fleetwood Mac “one of the most iconic bands in music.” Finn quickly answered fans’ questions about how his voice would fit in place of the departed Lindsey Buckingham by taking the lead on “The Chain.”

Campbell then switched guitars in order to play the song’s outro solo. For “Gypsy,” Campbell pulled double-duty, playing guitar as well as the song’s keyboard hook.

After “The Chain,” DeGeneres hugged Stevie Nicks and briefly spoke with the singer. The host acknowledged that it was a thrill to have them on her show because Fleetwood Mac usually don’t perform on TV.

Nicks introduced Finn and Campbell and promoted the band’s upcoming tour. DeGeneres added that her show is giving away a pair of tickets to every date. You fans can enter the contest at her website.

“There are 10 hits we have to do,” Nicks has previously said of the tour. “That leaves another 13 songs if you want to do a three-hour show. Then you crochet them all together and you make a great sequence and you have something that nobody has seen before except all the things they want to see are there. At rehearsal, we’re going to put up a board of 60 songs. Then we start with number one and we go through and we play everything. Slowly you start taking songs off and you start to see your set come together.”

Fleetwood Mac’s tour begins on October. 3rd in Tulsa, Oklahoma., with the first leg wrapping up with two nights at the Forum in Los Angeles on December. 11th and 13th.

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American Treasure, is a 60-track box set featuring previously unreleased live and studio material from Tom Petty, will be released on September. 28th. The songs on the collection are reportedly drawn from all phases of Petty’s career with his longtime band the Heartbreakers.

Full details including a complete track list are expected to be announced soon. The news was revealed today on Petty’s SiriusXM radio station, along with the debut of the first track from the box set, 1982’s previously unreleased “Keep a Little Soul.” American Treasure was reportedly compiled by Petty’s daughter Adria, his wife Dana, Heartbreakers guitarist and keyboardist Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench and “studio collaborator” Ryan Ulate.

After the countdown clock emerged this morning, many fans speculated that the news would be concerning the release of a double album version of Petty’s 1994 record Wildflowers. He had originally intended for the album, his second solo effort, to be a double album, but, at Warner Bros. request, he scaled it back to a single disc.

In 2014, it was reported that a set expected to be called Wildflowers: All the Rest, that restored the complete track list, was in the works to coincide with the album’s 20th anniversary. Only the song “Somewhere Under Heaven” has officially surfaced, appearing during the closing credits of the Entourage movie.

He was planning to support the release with a unique tour. “I want to take the Heartbreakers and whoever else I need to reproduce every sound in a big way,” he had said. “That album was really about sound in a big way. I would like to go out there and perform the entire album as it was originally conceived with all of the songs.”

“That would have been smaller-scale, away from the hits,” guitarist Mike Campbell later added. But he said that the plan, to which Norah Jones had signed on, was scrapped in favor of a career-spanning trek to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Heartbreakers. Unfortunately, Petty died a week after the last date of the tour, a September. 25th show at the Hollywood Bowl.

Tom Petty‘s family and former collaborators compiled the four-CD box set of previously unreleased material by Petty and the Heartbreakers, for release on September 28th, SiriusXM announced. The release, called An American Treasure, marks the first posthumous album of Petty material since his death in October. The SiriusXM broadcast debuted a clip from one of the unreleased songs from 1982 called “Keep a Little Soul.”

An American Treasurewill contain previously unreleased studio recordings, live recordings, deep cuts and alternate versions of popular Petty songs,. The collection will encompass 60 tracks in total. A less expensive two-CD set will also be available for purchase.

Petty was as prolific as he was talented. During the Eighties and Nineties, he released albums at a rapid pace. His studio productivity dipped slightly in the new millennium, when he put out an album roughly every four years. The last album Petty released under his own name was 2014’s Hypnotic Eye. He also contributed to 2016’s Mudcrutch 2 with members of his pre-Heartbreakers band.

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Petty was found unconscious at his home in Malibu on October 2nd, 2017. He was taken to the hospital and put temporarily on life support. He died hours later.

In January, a medical examiner ruled that the singer died of an accidental overdose. Petty had been prescribed drugs to treat emphysema, knee issues and a fractured hip, according to a statement from his family. “On the day he died, he was informed his hip had graduated to a full-on break,” Dana and Adria wrote. “It is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his overuse of medication.”

After we lost the iconic rocker Tom Petty. The 66-year-old died of cardiac arrest. In his memory, a new tribute collection called “An American Treasure” features previously unheard recording and live performances. Anthony Mason spoke to Petty’s daughter, Adria, in her first TV interview since her father’s death.

1              Surrender           Previously unreleased track from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers sessions-1976
2              Listen To Her Heart         Live at Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA-November 11, 1977
3              Anything That’s Rock ‘N’ Roll      Live at Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA-November 11, 1977
4              When The Time ComesAlbum track from You’re Gonna Get It!-May 2, 1978
5              You’re Gonna Get It       Alternate version featuring strings from You’re Gonna Get It! sessions-1978
6              Radio Promotion Spot    1977
7              Rockin’ Around (With You)          Album track from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers -November 9, 1976
8              Fooled Again (I Don’t Like It)       Alternate version from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers-1976
9              Breakdown         Live at Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA-November 11, 1977
10           The Wild One, Forever  Album track from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers-November 9, 1976
11           No Second Thoughts      Album track from You’re Gonna Get It!-May 2, 1978
12           Here Comes My Girl       Alternate version from Damn The Torpedoes sessions-1979
13           What Are You Doing In My Life  Alternate version from Damn The Torpedoes sessions-1979
14           Louisiana Rain    Alternate version from Damn The Torpedoes sessions-1979
15           Lost In Your Eyes              Previously unreleased single from Mudcrutch sessions-1974
CD 2
1              Keep A Little Soul             Previously unreleased track from Long After Dark sessions-1982
2              Even The Losers               Live at Rochester Community War Memorial, Rochester, NY-1989
3              Keeping Me Alive            Previously unreleased track from Long After Dark sessions-1982
4              Don’t Treat Me Like A Stranger  B-side to UK single of “I Won’t Back Down”-April, 1989
5              The Apartment Song      Demo recording (with Stevie Nicks)-1984
6              Concert Intro     Live introduction by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
7              King’s Road         Live at The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
8              Clear The Aisles                Live concert announcement by Tom Petty, The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
9              A Woman In Love (It’s Not Me)Live at The Forum, Inglewood, CA-June 28, 1981
10           Straight Into Darkness   Alternate version from The Record Plant, Hollywood, CA-May 5, 1982
11           You Can Still Change Your MindAlbum track from Hard Promises-May 5, 1981
12           Rebels  Alternate version from Southern Accents sessions-1985
13           Deliver Me          Alternate version from Long After Dark sessions-1982
14           Alright For Now                Album track from Full Moon Fever-April 24, 1989
15           The Damage You’ve Done            Alternate version from Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) sessions-1987
16           The Best Of Everything  Alternate version from Southern Accents sessions-March 26, 1985
17           Walkin’ From The Fire    Previously unreleased track from Southern Accents sessions-March 1, 1984
18           King Of The Hill  Early take (with Roger McGuinn)-November 23, 1987
CD 3
1              I Won’t Back Down          Live at The Fillmore, San Francisco, CA-February 4, 1997
2              Gainesville          Previously unreleased track from Echo sessions-February 12, 1998
3              You And I Will Meet Again            Album track from Into The Great Wide Open-July 2, 1991
4              Into The Great Wide Open          Live at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Arena-November 24, 1991
5              Two Gunslingers              Live at The Beacon Theatre, New York, NY-May 25, 2013
6              Lonesome Dave               Previously unreleased track from Wildflowers sessions-July 23, 1993
7              To Find A Friend               Album track from Wildflowers-November 1, 1994
8              Crawling Back To You      Album track from Wildflowers-November 1, 1994
9              Wake Up Time  Previously unreleased track from early Wildflowers sessions-August 12, 1992
10           Grew Up Fast    Album track from Songs and Music from “She’s the One”-August 6, 1996
11           I Don’t Belong   Previously unreleased track from Echo sessions-December 3, 1998
12           Accused Of Love              Album track from Echo-April 13, 1999
13           Lonesome Sundown      Album track from Echo-April 13, 1999
14           Don’t Fade On Me           Previously unreleased track from Wildflowers-sessions-April 20, 1994
CD 4
1              You And Me       Clubhouse version-November 9, 2007
2              Have Love Will Travel     Album track from The Last DJ-October 8, 2002
3              Money Becomes King    Album track from The Last DJ-October 8, 2002
4              Bus To Tampa Bay            Previously unreleased track from Hypnotic Eye sessions-August 11, 2011
5              Saving Grace      Live at Malibu Performing Arts Center, Malibu, CA-June 16, 2006
6              Down South       Album track from Highway Companion-July 25, 2006
7              Southern Accents            Live at Stephen C. O’Connell Center, Gainesville, FL-September 21, 2006
8              Insider  Live (with Stevie Nicks) at O’Connell Center, Gainesville, FL-September 21, 2006
9              Two Men Talking              Previously unreleased track from Hypnotic Eye sessions-November 16, 2012
10           Fault Lines           Album track from Hypnotic Eye-July 29, 2014
11           Sins Of My Youth             Early take from Hypnotic Eye sessions-November 12, 2012
12           Good Enough    Alternate version from Mojo sessions-2012
13           Something Good Coming             Album track from Mojo-July 15, 2010
14           Save Your Water              Album track from Mudcrutch 2-May 20, 2016
15           Like A DiamondAlternate version from The Last DJ sessions-2002
16           Hungry No More              Live at House of Blues, Boston, MA-June 15, 2016

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Mike Campbell was born in Panama City, Florida. He grew up there and in Jacksonville, Florida, where he graduated from High School in 1968. At 16, he bought his first guitar, a cheap Harmony model, from a pawnshop. His first electric guitar was a $60 Guyatone. Like Tom Petty, Campbell drew his strongest influences from The Byrds and Bob Dylan, with additional inspiration coming from guitarists such as Scotty Moore, Luther Perkins, George Harrison, Carl Wilson, Jerry Garcia, Roger McGuinn, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Jimmy Page, Mick Taylor, and Neil Young. The first song he learned to play was “Baby Let Me Follow You Down,” a song which appeared on Dylan’s eponymous debut album.

Mudcrutch moved to L.A. and signed a record deal with Shelter Records, recording an album in 1974 that ended up being shelved. Campbell then joined Petty to start up the original Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers in 1975 along with Benmont Tench (keyboards), Ron Blair (bass guitar) and Stan Lynch (drums).

He formed a band named Dead or Alive which quickly disbanded. Campbell first met Tom Petty through Mudcrutch drummer Randall Marsh when they were auditioning him and he suggested his friend Mike to play rhythm guitar.

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Like the other players in the Heartbreakers, Campbell avoids the virtuoso approach to playing, preferring to have his work serve the needs of each song. Guitar World magazine noted “there are only a handful of guitarists who can claim to have never wasted a note. Mike Campbell is certainly one of them”. He is a highly melodic player, often using two or three-strings-at-a-time leads instead of the more conventional one-at-a-time approach. “People have told me that my playing sounds like bagpipes,” he muses. “I’m not exactly sure what that means.” His estimation of his own style is typically modest: “I don’t think people can really top Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton as far as lead guitar goes. I like my playing to bring out the songs.” Like Tench, he is heavily involved in constructing the arrangements for the Heartbreakers’ tunes. And also like Tench, he prefers rawness to polish in the studio and onstage.

Directed by Justin Kreutzmann, this 15 chapter web documentary features Mike Campbell taking us on a tour of his guitar collection and explaining the stories and significance behind the instruments as they relate to his own personal journey and the music of Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers.

0:01 “Chapter 1: Introduction – Treasured Gifts That Keep Giving” 7:50 “Chapter 2: A Sound Is Born On The 1964 Fender Stratocaster” 13:32 “Chapter 3: The Irreplaceable Fender Broadcaster Part 1” 18:46 “Chapter 4: The Irreplaceable Fender Broadcaster Part 2” 23:47 “Chapter 5: Thicker and Dirtier – The Gibson Goldtop” 29:18 “Chapter 6: Chimes of Freedom The Rickenbacker Sound – Part 1” 34:40 “Chapter 7: Chimes of Freedom The Rickenbacker Sound – Part 2” 40:14 “Chapter 8: In Between Bright and Heavy That Gretsch Tone” 46:33 “Chapter 9: A Whole Studio On Your Guitar Vox” 51:03 “Chapter 10: Biting Clear and Loud The Gibson Les Paul Jr. and SG” 57:23 “Chapter 11: Begging To Be Played The 1959 Gibson Les Paul” 1:04:37 “Chapter 12: The Surf Sound of The Fender Jaguar/The Mike Campbell Duesenbeg and the Super Bowl” 1:10:32 “Chapter 13: Handle With Care: (Another) Invaluable 1964 Fender Stratocaster” 1:16:39 “Chapter 14: The Homestead and Studio” 1:23:37 “Chapter 15: Assorted Specialties and Conclusion”

Mike Campbell’s drool-inducing lineup of vintage guitars and amps he brings on the road. Campbell’s guitar tech, Steve Winstead, walks us through every guitar, amp, and pedal and lets us in on Campbell’s time-tested formula for great tone.

Guitars
One side of Campbell’s guitar arsenal covers all the bases. From the left side we have “Little Ricky,” which is a Rickenbacker-style mandolin with a whammy bar. Next is a recent Fender Custom Shop Tele with a B-Bender used as a backup, then a pair of Rickenbacker 12-strings—the one on the right is used on “Free Fallin’.” A pair of ‘50s Teles follows those as well as a Gretsch 6186 Clipper tuned to open-G for “I Won’t Back Down.” Finally, there’s a mid-’60s Gibson SG that Campbell’s been favoring for this tour after recently digging it out of storage.

The basic formula for Campbell’s amp rig is to crank up some low-watt amps and let the PA do all the heavy lifting. The bulk of his sound comes from a 1963 Fender Princeton and a 1954 Fender tweed Deluxe. He augments that with a custom Fender Excelsior and a Fender Vibrotane for Leslie-type effects.

Effects
Campbell relies on a rare Dunlop Camel Toe for his distortion, a Line 6 DL-4, the Green Meanie switch (which brings his Fender Excelsior amp in and out), a DigiTech Whammy II, Line 6 MM-4, a custom switch for his 1962 reissue Fender reverb tank, a Boss RC-30, and a Boss TU-2 tuner.

Rest In Peace Tom Petty: 1950 – 2017

American musician Tom Petty died on October 2nd, 2017 in California aged 66, says a statement issued on behalf of his family. Petty was found unconscious, not breathing and in full cardiac arrest at his Malibu home early on Monday. He was taken to hospital, but could not be revived and died later that evening. Petty was best known as the lead singer of Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers rock band, producing such hits as American Girl, Breakdown, Free Fallin’, Learning to Fly and Refugee. “He died peacefully at 20.40 Pacific time (03.40 GMT Tuesday) surrounded by family, his bandmates and friends,” said his long-time manager Tony Dimitriades. Petty and the band were on the forefront of the heartland rock movement, alongside artists such as Bruce Springsteen and Bob Seger. The genre eschews the synthesizer-based music and fashion elements. Petty was also a co-founder of the Traveling Wilburys group in the late 1980s, touring with Bob Dylan, Roy Orbison, Jeff Lynne and George Harrison. “It’s shocking, crushing news,” said Dylan, according to the Los Angeles Times. “I thought the world of Tom. He was great performer, full of the light, a friend, and I’ll never forget him.” Petty also found solo success in 1989 with his album Full Moon Fever, which featured one of his most popular songs Free Fallin’, co-written with Jeff Lynne. In 2002, Petty was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers The Record Plant, Sausalito April 23, 1977. Very good to excellent WXRT FM broadcast. Originally broadcast over KSAN Radio. With Byrd’s riffs and Stones swagger, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers burst onto the scene in ’76 blending British invasion, US garage rock with the urgency & vibrancy of current new wave bands. This is one of their earliest radio shows broadcast by KSAN-FM from the Record Plant, Sausalito on April 23rd 1977. Captures the band ripping through their current set in front of a small audience in remastered sound quality.  Original performance on LP (“Tearjerker” bootleg) .

Surrender 3:10
Jaguar And The Thunderbird 2:49
American Girl 5:20
Fooled Again (I don’t like it) 5:35
Luna 4:42
Listen To Her Heart 3:13
I Need To Know 2:36
Strangered In The Night 4:12
Dogs On The Run 10:25
Route 66 3:50

Tom Petty – guitar, vocals Mike Campbell – guitar Benmont Tench – keyboards Ron Blair – bass Stan Lynch – drums Guest. Al Kooper

Initially following its release, the album received little attention in the United States.  But Following a U/K tour, it climbed up the UK album chart and the single “Anything That’s Rock ‘n’ Roll” became a hit in the UK. After nearly a year and many positive reviews, the album reached the U.S. charts, and eventually went Gold.

It’s a great American rock album with beautifully constructed songs and a passionate vocal from Tom Petty.
It runs in at a little over 1/2 an hour so it is slightly short by today’s standards but the music there in is wonderful.
Before I mention the songs individually , I should say that there isn’t the searing guitar overload of a live performance, in that the solos are short and not as stand-out in the mix.
Live, there was more emphasis on soloing but the songs are rock ‘n’ roll works of art and this is an album that you can’t tire of.
Luna, is a beautiful ballad, is my favourite song of the album and I would say that it is a unique song , part blues, part lullaby , with a beautiful organ melody that you’ll never forget.
huge anthemic track American Girl is a joy and the guitar solo at the end is a piece of magic,
The Wild One Forever and Mystery Man are beautiful , gentle songs with melodies to die for.
Throw in Fooled Again, Breakdown and Strangered in the Night et.al. and you have one of the best albums ever made. Wonderful stuff !.

The singles “Breakdown” and “American Girl” became an FM radio tracks that can still be heard today.

The album was recorded and mixed at the Shelter Studio, Hollywood, California.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

Petty’s breakthrough album plays like his most genuine slice of rock ‘n’ roll – probably because his two earlier albums didn’t do much, and that hunger drips through nearly every single groove. ‘Damn the Torpedoes’ heads straight into a world where Byrds-ian folk-rock collides with heartland-sized riffs. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers never hit the brakes.

Not long after You’re Gonna Get It, Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers’ label, Shelter Records, was sold to MCA Records. Petty struggled to free himself from the major label, eventually sending himself into bankruptcy. He settled with MCA and set to work on his third album, digging out some old Mudcrutch numbers and quickly writing new songs. Amazingly, through all the frustration and anguish, Petty & the Heartbreakers delivered their breakthrough and arguably their masterpiece with the album Damn the Torpedoes.

Musically, it follows through on the promise of their first two albums, offering a tough, streamlined fusion of the Stones and Byrds that, thanks to Jimmy Iovine’s clean production, sounded utterly modern yet timeless. It helped that the Heartbreakers had turned into a tighter, muscular outfit, reminiscent of, well, the Stones in their prime — all of the parts combine into a powerful, distinctive sound capable of all sorts of subtle variations. Their musical suppleness helps bring out the soul in Petty’s impressive set of songs. He had written a few classics before like “American Girl,” “Listen to Her Heart” — but here his songwriting truly blossoms. Most of the songs have a deep melancholy undercurrent — the tough “Here Comes My Girl” and “Even the Losers” have tender hearts; the infectious “Don’t Do Me Like That” masks a painful relationship; “Refugee” is a scornful, blistering rocker; “Louisiana Rain” is a tear-jerking ballad. Yet there are purpose and passion behind the performances that makes Damn the Torpedoes an invigorating listen all the same. Few mainstream rock albums of the late ’70s and early ’80s were quite as strong as this, and it still stands as one of the great records of the album rock era.

It’s about an hour before Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers play Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre for what may be the last time. Backstage, Petty is in his dressing room putting on a frontier rebel’s headdress to fight the chill. Keyboardist Benmont Tench is tweeting about the sad state of our country under Donald Trump. Bassist Ron Blair has battled stage fright for years since rejoining the Heartbreakers in 2002, after a 20-year sanity break. He wanders into Tom Petty’s dressing room and cops to something you’re not likely to admit to your bandleader unless you’ve known him for 40 years. “I’m kinda nervous, you know,” says Blair in a quiet voice.

Petty rarely describes himself as the leader of his band, but as “the older brother they sometimes have to listen to.” Tonight, he gives Blair some fatherly assurance and a toothy Southern smile: “Let me be nervous for you.”

The band takes the stage and blows through “Rockin’ Around (With You),” the first song on its self-titled first album, from 1976. Petty ends the next few songs strumming in front of the drum set, trading man-crush smiles with drummer Steve Ferrone (Tench jokes, “They should get a room”). Petty even grins through a joyous version of “Walls,” from 1996’s She’s the Onean album he’s complained about for nearly 20 years.

And then there’s a flash of lightning. Rain pours down. The Heartbreakers are shooed into the catacombs of Red Rocks, and 9,000 fans head for cover.

As the bandmates wait out the rain, Petty asks if they want to add their 1999 song “Swingin'” to the second half of the set. Everyone agrees: They do. The Heartbreakers aren’t a democracy, but more of a benevolent dictatorship. This is true when it comes to the set list. “We can make suggestions,” says Tench with a wry smile. “Sometimes they’re even accepted.”

After 20 minutes, the Heartbreakers retake the stage. They play “Swingin’,” which has a chorus where Petty lists icons who “went down swinging,” including Sonny Liston and Sammy Davis. Tench, who sings with Petty on the song, switches it up. Epstein provided the beautiful high harmonies on the record, so Tench sneaks in a tribute to his departed friend: “He went down swingin’/Just like Howie Epstein.”

Petty is supposed to do some acoustic numbers from Wildflowers, his 1994 solo album. There’s just one problem: His guitar is dead, soaked by the rain. There’s confusion and uncertainty on the band mates’ faces for a moment, like it’s a 1975 show at a honky-tonk in Gainesville. Then Petty and Campbell shout across the stage, “Ben, play something!”

Tench, the best keyboardist in American rock, breaks into a pastiche of boogie-woogie, a homage to pianist Pete Johnson. The group chimes in, not quite in sync, until Petty switches to Chuck Berry’s “Carol.” The Heartbreakers fall in line, sounding like the best bar band you don’t want to tell your friends about.

They encore with “American Girl.” The bandmates take a bow, wiping sweat and rain off their faces. Everyone exits, but Petty seems reluctant to leave. He takes a few steps toward the front of the stage and gives a last wave.

One word Petty and the band never mention: retirement. Petty still goes into his Malibu home office to write songs  right across from his home studio. He’s mostly a homebody, rarely even venturing the 45 minutes into Los Angeles unless it’s to see his two daughters and his young granddaughter. There was a Mudcrutch tour last year and a turn producing a record for former Byrds bassist Chris Hillman. The Heartbreakers will record again and play live in some capacity. After 40 years, it would be surprising if there weren’t a few regrets. “Howie should’ve gotten some lead on a record,” Tench says of Epstein. “He should’ve produced a record for the Heartbreakers. I would’ve loved that.” Then he shrugs. “But I’m not in charge.”

There’s been a valedictory feel to the Heartbreakers‘ 40th-anniversary tour, which Petty says is the band’s final country-spanning run – the “last big one.” Everyone else is a bit skeptical. “I’ve been hearing that for 15 years,” says guitarist and original Heartbreaker Mike Campbell. “We’ll see.”

The crowds are still there, something Petty is clearly proud of when we sit down in a hotel room on an off day. To be honest, he looks more jittery offstage than on. This may be because he is chain-smoking, alternating between Marlboros and vaping, perhaps as a concession to the Denver Ritz-Carlton’s smoking policy.

Petty says sleep is now his friend. “I need a new Netflix show, does anyone have any suggestions?” he asks just before his assistant ducks out of the room. Someone suggests Bloodlinea noirish series set in his native Florida.

Petty is defiant about the hyper pace of the tour, which hits 30 cities this spring and summer. “Unless you’ve done it, you can’t understand what it is,” says Petty, brushing his scarecrow hair out of his face. “And if you’re not really experienced, you will fall.”

What keeps the Heartbreakers together is simple: The band has been their life since 1976.  Benjamin Montmorency Tench III, was a prep-school kid and piano prodigy. Tench wears suits and went to Exeter, but he’s the fiery one. In the Peter Bogdanovich documentary on the Heartbreakers, 2007’s Runnin’ Down a Dream, Tench can be heard screaming at his bandmates to take things seriously. His nickname is Mad Dog. When Tench used to go on one of his tirades, a roadie would slide a dog bowl of water under his piano.

Petty, Campbell and 
Tench formed the nucleus of the band Mudcrutch,
which morphed into the
 Heartbreakers in 1976,
 after adding San Diego native Blair on bass and 
Stan Lynch on drums.
 Blair fried out and
 bailed in 1982. He opened a bikini shop in the Valley and was replaced by Howie Epstein, but the band loomed in his subconscious. “I’d dream I’d be walking to the stage, and be like, ‘I don’t know “Mary Jane’s Last Dance,”‘ recalls Blair. “I had half a dozen of those nightmares, so I started learning those songs so I could get a night’s sleep.”

This proved fortuitous when Epstein died of heroin-related complications in 2003. “I don’t think the band continues without Ron,” Tench tells me. “Bringing in someone new wouldn’t have worked.”

“About 20 years ago, we stopped doing soundchecks,” says Petty. “It eats up the whole day and we’d argue, and then you’d come back and the sound would be completely different with a crowd.”

The other game-changer was Dylan. By 1986, the band had toured relentlessly for a decade. Off the road, everyone was a mess – some members dealing with substance issues, some just dealing with real life. “The road and the studio are the only places I’ve ever felt completely OK,” says Petty, lighting another Marlboro. “In any other life situation I’m terribly retarded.” Petty got a call from Dylan asking if the band would back him on a tour. Petty raced out a “hell, yes.” Watching footage, you can see him smiling his head off, ecstatic to not be leading the show. The experience taught him how to be in the Heartbreakers, not just lead them. “That’s when we learned how to really be a band,” says Petty.

 

One word Petty and the band never mention: retirement. Petty still goes into his Malibu home office to write songs  right across from his home studio. He’s mostly a homebody, rarely even venturing the 45 minutes into Los Angeles unless it’s to see his two daughters and his young granddaughter. There was a Mudcrutch tour last year and a turn producing a record for former Byrds bassist Chris Hillman. The Heartbreakers will record again and play live in some capacity. After 40 years, it would be surprising if there weren’t a few regrets. “Howie should’ve gotten some lead on a record,” Tench says of Epstein. “He should’ve produced a record for the Heartbreakers. I would’ve loved that.” Then he shrugs. “But I’m not in charge.”