Posts Tagged ‘Wildflowers’

Tom Petty - Leave Virginia Alone Artwork

“Leave Virginia Alone,” the lead single and another previously unreleased song from Tom Petty’s long-awaited second half of Wildflowers—a collection he named All The Rest—is out now. Tom wrote “Leave Virginia Alone” in January 1993—very early in the evolution of Wildflowers.
The song debuts alongside a video co-directed by Mark Seliger and Tom’s daughter Adria Petty. The video stars emerging actress/dancer Casimere Jollette (Netflix’s forthcoming “Tiny Pretty Things”) and was shot around Connecticut as well as in and around Seliger’s studio in New York City.
In speaking with David Fricke on SiriusXM’s Tom Petty Radio, Adria notes, “We were very resourceful about trying to create a character that could be assigned to anyone.

That’s why Virginia in this video is very mysterious but she has her little glimpses of characters. We really worked to cast someone authentic—that felt like they were really feeling their feelings and someone that you could believe. We really wanted the song to do the heavy lifting in this video, and sort of step out of the way and just give it something to breathe with.” Seliger furthers, “The one idea that kept coming back to both of us is that we really want Tom to be narrating the story. We really want to hear his voice as he runs you through this journey that this woman is having.”

Official Music Video for Tom Petty’s “Leave Virginia Alone’ from ‘Wildflowers & All The Rest’ The album, Wildflowers, originally released in 1994, is commonly vaunted as Tom Petty’s most personal, most heartfelt, and most revealing artistic statement of his career. Recorded over the course of two years and originally intended to be a two-disc album, it was perhaps the most creative period in his life. The release of Wildflowers & All The Rest on October 16th, 2020 will finally gather together all 25 songs from the original recording sessions – the 15 songs from Wildflowers, plus the 10 songs that were left off the original release.

San Francisco Ca - Tom Petty at Bay Area Music Awards 1998 at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco California On March 7 1998 Usa Oakland1998 Bay Area Music Awards

The new Tom Petty box set after a long time waiting is finally getting a release, Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell tells us that the group hopes to release a live set commemorating their 1997 residency at the Fillmore in San Francisco. They played 20 sold-out shows at the historic theatre in January and February of that year, radically changing the setlist each night. In 2009, seven songs from the Fillmore run were released on the Live Anthology compilation, but that was just a tiny sampling of their total collection.

“For me, that was almost the pinnacle of the band just being totally spontaneous night to night to night,” says Campbell. “We might throw in a Grateful Dead song that we just learned that afternoon. We recorded every show and we had guest artists from Bo Diddley to Roger McGuinn to John Lee Hooker. And I know, in my memory of those 20 nights, there’s an amazing album in there.”

Tom Petty estate finally release an expanded edition of his 1995 LP solo “Wildflowers”. Petty had said  that he wanted to take the Heartbreakers and whoever else to reproduce every sound in a big way,” of that album. That album was really about sound in a big way. The plan was to go out there and perform the entire album as it was originally conceived with all of the songs.”

“Wildflowers” was initially envisioned as a double album, but was ultimately pared down to 15 songs on a single CD release. It became one of the most successful records of his career, with singles “You Don’t Know How It Feels,” “You Wreck Me” and “It’s Good To Be King” all getting extensive radio play. For years, Petty has been contemplating assembling the unreleased material into a deluxe package. The Super Deluxe Edition of the set features 70 tracks, spread out over five CDs, with nine songs that have never been released plus 34 alternate versions.

Curated by Tom’s daughters, Adria and Annakim Petty and his wife Dana Petty. A 2-CD set includes 25 songs, with ten previously unreleased cuts. A top of the line Super Deluxe Edition is a sprawling package available in a 5-CD or 9-LP 180g vinyl.

In addition to the original LP, the box contains a disc titled All the Rest that includes 10 outtakes from the sessions, five of which have never been heard. The third disc is comprised of 15 Petty home demos, with three of its 15 songs unreleased. The fourth CD consists of live versions of 14 songs recorded between 1995 and 2017, 12 available for the first time. The fifth disc, Finding Wallflowers, consists of 16 alternate studio versions.

“I think I put four of the [Wildflowers outtakes] on the She’s The One soundtrack just to fill out the album,” says Tom Petty. “But they were very hastily mixed. Take ‘Climb That Hill.’ There’s a version of that on She’s The One, but the Wildflowers one I think is extremely better. ‘Hung Up And Overdue’ is another one remixed and it turned into an epic. Carl Wilson [of the Beach Boys] and [Heartbreakers bassist] Howie Epstein singing quite a bit of harmony that didn’t come through on the original. Then again, there’s probably six songs that nobody has heard. There’s 11 or 12 [new] songs on the album. I think people are going to like it a lot. I like it a lot.”

The new version of Wildflowers will be released. “At one point the label really just wanted to put it out as a standalone album, And then there’s the point of view where they want to put both records together. There’s also the point of view that wants the box set with all the demos and all that.

The Wildflowers box set has been in the works for quite a long time, something that Petty frequently spoke of in his final years. The 1994 album was originally envisioned as a two-disc set, meaning many songs got cut for space when it was truncated. A sweet, tender melodic ballad opens Tom Petty’s acclaimed 1994 album Wildflowers. The title track’s initial chorus reveals a simple desire: freedom.

You belong among the wildflowers / You belong in a boat out at sea / Sail away, kill off the hours / You belong somewhere you feel free.”

“I swear to god it’s all ad-lib from the word ‘go,’’ Petty told Paul Zollo in his 2005 book, Conversations with Tom Petty. “I turned on my tape deck, picked up my acoustic guitar, took a breath and played that from start to finish. And then sat back and went ‘Wow, what did I just do?’ And I listened to it. I didn’t change a word. Everything was just right there, off the top of my head. It’s a very sweet song. It’s got really good intentions.” Sonically, “Wildflowers” came from a different world than much of Petty’s work from the ’80s. There are no drums on the track at all, and the song features little more than a jangly acoustic guitar, piano, a spot or two of harmony and Petty’s pure vocals. Turning instead to a more stripped-down, raw and natural approach, he entered the studio with his bandmates from the Heartbreakers, unsure exactly of what the result would be. “Wildflowers” arrived like a breath of fresh air, or as Petty put it, a “stream of consciousness.”

“I actually only spent three and a half minutes on that whole song,” the rocker confessed to Zollo. “So I’d come back for days playing that tape, thinking there must be something wrong here because this just came too easy. And then I realized that there’s probably nothing wrong at all.”

Producer Rick Rubin was also taken aback by the flow of material pouring out of Petty.

“One day, between cassette recordings of songs he was working on, he began strumming the guitar,” said Rubin . “After a couple of minutes of strumming chords, he played me an intricate new song complete with lyrics and story. I asked him what it was about. He said he didn’t know, it just came out. He had written it, or more like channelled it, in that very moment. He didn’t know what it was about or what the inspiration was. It arrived fully formed. It was breath-taking.”

Though Rubin couldn’t remember the exact song Petty played — it could very well have been “Wildflowers” — the producer was amazed by the the ease with which Petty put tunes together. Rubin, also enamoured with the songwriting from Full Moon Fever (1989), would go on to produce the entire Wildflowers record.

“When we first met, I was impressed with his dedication to writing,” the producer recalled. “He wrote constantly and called me to come and hear new songs often. There is a poetry about them that spoke to me.” But that poetry wasn’t immediately clear to Petty when he wrote “Wildflowers,” and the direction the song was taking him was unclear, though he knew his crumbling marriage was likely playing a part.

“I’ve read that Echo is my ‘divorce album’, but Wildflowers is the divorce album,” Petty told biographer Warren Zanes in the 2015 book, Petty: The Biography. “That’s me getting ready to leave. I don’t even know how conscious I was of it when I was writing it. I don’t go into this stuff with elaborate plans. But I’m positive that’s what Wildflowers is. It just took me getting up the guts to leave this huge empire that we had built, to walk out.” When the title track came tumbling out of his head, Petty didn’t recognize his subject straight away. His therapist asked him who the song was about.

“I told him I wasn’t sure,” the musician recalled to Zanes. “And then he said ‘I know. The song is about you. That’s you singing to yourself what you needed to hear.’” It appeared the freedom the subject was seeking was Petty’s to find. Whatever had been bottled up inside had come out onto the page and had become an unforgettable three minute song about love and liberation. “It kind of knocked me back,” Petty admitted. “But I realized he was right. It was me singing to me.”

Petty had seen the Rolling Stones play Sticky Fingers at the Fonda Theatrer in Los Angeles and noticed they played it completely out of sequence. “Single album concerts often don’t scan right for a concert,” he said. “But with the amount of material I had for the Wildflowers double album, I think I’ve got enough tempos and types of songs that I could do a live show … And it’ll be fun for the audience since there’s a bunch of songs they’ll know.

The album, which features hits like You Don’t Know How It Feels,” “You Wreck Me” and “It’s Good To Be King,” has been due an extensive re-release.

Now that he’s gone, his former collaborators are determined to see the projection to fruition. “I see that in the cards,” says producer Ryan Ulyate. “It’s going to be fantastic.” There’s also talk of deluxe editions of key albums from Petty’s catalogue. “If there’s a market for something like that,” says Campbell, “we’ll do it.”

Wildflowers & All The Rest—Super Deluxe Edition: A 5-CD and 9-LP 180g Direct to Consumer, Limited Edition set that features 70 tracks, nine unreleased songs and 34 unreleased versions. Includes Rick Rubin introduction, David Fricke essay, track-by-track for all music and lyrics to all the songs on Wildflowers and All The Rest. This set also comes with a hardbound book, cloth patch of Wildflowers logo, sticker of Wildflowers logo, replica of “Dogs with Wings” tour program (the 1995 Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers tour), hand-written 4-song lyric reprints in vellum envelope, a litho of new and exclusive art by Blaze Ben Brooks for the song “Only A Broken Heart,” and a (numbered) Certificate of Authenticity.

 

The Tom Petty estate has dug into the late musician’s vault and shared a lost cut from his historic “Wildflower” sessions dubbed “There Goes Angela (Dream Away).” Petty’s family released a demo version of “You Don’t Know How It Feels” in June and confirmed that an expanded version of 1994’s Wildflowers LP was underway. “The family and the band are in a joyful process of discovering the “Wildflowers” sessions and demos.

Another track from Tom Petty’s long-awaited Wildflowers box has been released. It’s a demo made at home for the song, The cut premiered today on Petty’s SiriusXM station, with Heartbreakers keyboardist Benmont Tench and engineer George Drakoulias showing up on David Fricke’s program for the debut. This acts as yet another teaser of a new Wildflowers celebratory release, to be an “exhaustive chronicle of the making of one of Petty’s most enduring albums.”

As Adria Petty explained in June, “The family and all our engineers and the Heartbreakers have been circling around this project and making it as delightful and completist as possible. We’re really pleased to be able to share the second half of the Wildflowers double album. But there are also completist versions of how the sessions evolved. My dad was prolific at that time and there was so much recording done.”

No further details about the expanded version of Wildflowers have surfaced yet, but Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell has speculated that the band could regroup to perform the record when it finally does come out. “It would be a great tribute to Tom just to do that album,” he said. “We’d probably have four or five different guest singers with us. We don’t know who they might be, though, or when this might happen.”

Interestingly, the only way to access “There Goes Angela (Dream Away)” is to complete a short Tom Petty quiz.

Wildflowers outtake

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Tom Petty’s solo masterpiece, “Wildflowers”, will be getting an expanded release. The news was confirmed by his daughter, Adria Petty, in an interview  (June 25) on the Tom Petty Channel on SiriusXM. The collection, still referred to as “the Wildflowers project,” “is still not ready,” but a first release – a home demo of his “You Don’t Know How it Feels” – was premiered on the channel during the interview.

With some reported estate squabbles settled, the project is being overseen by Adria and her sister AnnaKim, in conjunction with Petty’s widow, Dana, and the Heartbreakers. Though the LP’s 25th anniversary passed in 2019, fans will likely savour what’s to come. Adria Petty was careful not to make a hard promise on a specific date for the release but the team is aiming for 2020.  In the years since Tom Petty released his landmark Wildflowers album, much has been said about the Rick Rubin-helmed sessions and how much unreleased material was left behind as the album evolved.  Petty originally had enough songs to release Wildflowers as a double-album – reportedly with at least 26 songs – but was persuaded against it.  In 2015, he released a preview track, “Somewhere Under Heaven,” for the release provisionally entitled Wildflowers: All The Rest.  But the collection was shelved after his death.

An expanded release of Wildflowers has been discussed for quite some time. Adria Petty said, “[We look forward to putting] this masterpiece in the framing that it deserved.” The finished set will include home recordings and demos. The team decided to put the “You Don’t Know How it Feels” demo out now because “fans have been waiting for this for such a long time,” she said.

“We don’t have my dad’s brilliant ears and eyes,” she said, “but as we were playing the demos, this one put everyone feeling really good. We get to [hear] my dad unpolished. This song is really cool because you see it coming right out of his notebook.”

The long rumoured projected had often been referred to as Wildflowers and All the Rest.

The news had been teased on Petty’s website and on YouTube, which featured an image of a wolf-like figure dressed in human clothing with the phrase “Most Things That I Worry ‘Bout Never Happen Anyway,” a lyric from the album’s “Crawling Back to You.” As a result, the members of the Facebook group Tom Petty Nation spent much of Thursday afternoon speculating on what the release would entail.

Tom Petty died on October 2nd, 2017, one week to the day after he and the Heartbreakers completed their 40th anniversary tour.

“Wildflowers”, was called Petty’s “finest hour as a recording artist and darkest as a songwriter.” The November. 1st, 1994 release was his 10th album and first under a new contract with Warner Bros. Records. Among the original’s 15 songs are such Petty favorites as “You Don’t Know How it Feels,” “You Wreck Me,” “Time to Move On,” and the beautiful title cut “Wildflowers”.

Tom Petty released “Somewhere Under Heaven,” co-written with Mike Campbell for 1994’s Wildflowers but left unheard until now. The track, available for purchase now through digital retailers, which will be part of a new archival project titled Wildflowers: All the Rest.

Even a brief listen to “Somewhere Under Heaven” places it firmly in context with the original album’s layered complexity. You can hear a sample of the new song above. The three-times platinum Wildflowers, a No. 8 hit that marked the first of three Petty albums co-produced by Rick Rubin, moved with deceptive grace from brawny rockers (“You Wreck Me,” “Cabin Down Below,” “Honey Bee”) to acoustic fragility (the title track, “Time to Move On”) to moving longform narratives (“It’s Good to be King,” “Crawling Back to You”).

And apparently there was much more where that came from. The release of Wildflowers: All the Rest, which features songs written between 1992-94, apparently corrects a wrong that goes back more than two decades. Petty says Wildflowers was originally intended to be a double album.

“Somewhere Under Heaven” can also be heard during the closing credits for the movie Entourage, which opens this week. Petty’s  last studio album, Hypnotic Eye, became his first-ever U.S. No. 1. It was also his highest-charting U.K. release since Wildflowers went Top 10 20 years ago..

The track was recorded for 1994’s Wildflowers, which will see a second disc from those sessions called Wallflowers: All the Rest hit shelves at some point in the future. But Petty was quick to point out that these aren’t outtakes.

“The original plan was to release it as as the complete Wildflowers album with the original album and this,” he said. “And Warner Bros. came back to us and said, ‘Look, this is far too good a record to just send straight to the catalog racks. We’re going to put it out as its own album.’ I was behind that decision too. It’s done and we’re eventually going to put it out. It’s just sitting there finished,

Several of The Best of Everything’s 38 songs, including “You Don’t Know How It Feels,” are plucked from Petty’s beloved solo album Wildflowers, which was released on this day in 1994. To commemorate Wildflowers’ 24th anniversary,

While there’s no word on the long-promised expanded edition of Tom Petty’s 1994 album Wildflowers, we have some new insight of the sessions courtesy of its producer, Rick Rubin. In a new interview, he discussed the recording of the tracks and how Petty was “haunted” by its legacy.

As Rubin told Malcolm Gladwell on their Broken Record podcast (embedded below), the genesis for Wildflowers came from the sessions that resulted in the bonus tracks for the Heartbreakers‘ 1993 compilation, “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and the cover of Thunderclap Newman’s “Something in the Air.” After the meticulous work they did with Jeff Lynne, Rubin freed them in the studio, and it resulted in what Rubin called a more “organic” sound, that “felt more alive and more human,” and they decided to continue working together.

It was a particularly “fertile” and “prolific” period in Petty’s career, as Rubin noted. Plus, Petty was eager to please his new producer and open to suggestions. “Hope You Never,” one of the leftovers that wound up on the She’s the One soundtrack, was a particular example.

“We did that very in a straightforward way, kind of almost Jeff Lynne-y drumwise,” he said. “Very straight. And we probably played that a bunch of different ways before we decided, ‘Oh, we like it this way.’ [We] probably played it more like band-style and then it’s like, ‘This lends itself more to the kind of hypnotic, locked-in sound.’ It’s a more down-tempo, moody piece, sort of the sarcastic Tom — ‘I hope you never fall in love with somebody like you.'”

Rubin said that they recorded “between 26 and 28 songs,” but Warner Bros. felt a single LP would have greater commercial potential. Petty, who repeatedly fought with his former label MCA, agreed with his new bosses and they went about figuring out which songs to include and in what order. Wildflowers was eventually released in November 1994 with 15 tracks. But Petty always hoped to put out the others.

“He thought it was really important because the legacy of the Wildflowers album loomed large in his career,” Rubin continued. “And he knew that the second half of Wildflowers was an important statement. His issue was [that] he didn’t want to put it out as a new Tom Petty album, ’cause it’s not a new Tom Petty album — it was recorded 25 years ago — and he didn’t want to release it as an old catalog album because he thought it deserved more than being a catalog album. He felt like it was too good to just put out and was sort of looking for the right story where it would have the exposure that it deserved. And he never came up with it.”

About two and a half years ago, Petty went to Rubin’s house and played the unreleased tracks, which he had since made a few changes to, for Rubin, and the quality “floored” him. “I had, like, a vague memory of them,” he said, “but some of them just hit me like, ‘Wow, what a great song! How did we ever miss this?'”

But during that listening session, Petty opened up about how he knew they had channeled something magical on those tapes, and could never get it back.

“He told me Wildflowers scares him, because he’s not really sure why it’s as good as it is,” Rubin said. “So it has this, like, haunted feeling for him. … He loves it, but it’s not like he can turn that on again. He couldn’t make Wildflowers 2 today. That was the point. The point was, ‘I can’t do this now. This was then, and it was where I was then and it was a prolific period. This is an extension of that moment.'”

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TOM PETTY has completed a new album due for mid summer entitled “Hypnotic Eye” it presently has 11 tracks with a more 60’s garage rock feel, striaght end to end rockin record, snake organ with clipped fuzz guitars produced by Tom and guitarist Mike Campbell. Also news that a live album is due to be issued from last years tour.

the Wildflowers album is to be re-issued with the deluxe treatment with an extra 10 tracks the 1994 album featured this great track .