Posts Tagged ‘Stevie Nicks’

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Fleetwood Mac debuted their new revamped lineup by performing “The Chain” and “Gypsy” on Wednesday’s edition of The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

The televised appearance marked the longtime band’s first time playing live alongside guitarists Mike Campbell, formerly of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Crowded House’s Neil Finn, both of whom stepped in after Fleetwood Mac fired Lindsey Buckingham last April.

Both guitarists featured prominently in the performances, flanking to the left and right of Stevie Nicks; on both “The Chain” and “Gypsy,” Finn handled the vocal parts previously sung by Buckingham, particularly on “The Chain,” where Finn and Nicks showcased their budding vocal chemistry.

They played two classic songs, “The Chain” and “Gypsy,” which you can watch below.

Host Ellen DeGeneres introduced the group by saying that it’s sold more than 100 million albums and calling Fleetwood Mac “one of the most iconic bands in music.” Finn quickly answered fans’ questions about how his voice would fit in place of the departed Lindsey Buckingham by taking the lead on “The Chain.”

Campbell then switched guitars in order to play the song’s outro solo. For “Gypsy,” Campbell pulled double-duty, playing guitar as well as the song’s keyboard hook.

After “The Chain,” DeGeneres hugged Stevie Nicks and briefly spoke with the singer. The host acknowledged that it was a thrill to have them on her show because Fleetwood Mac usually don’t perform on TV.

Nicks introduced Finn and Campbell and promoted the band’s upcoming tour. DeGeneres added that her show is giving away a pair of tickets to every date. You fans can enter the contest at her website.

“There are 10 hits we have to do,” Nicks has previously said of the tour. “That leaves another 13 songs if you want to do a three-hour show. Then you crochet them all together and you make a great sequence and you have something that nobody has seen before except all the things they want to see are there. At rehearsal, we’re going to put up a board of 60 songs. Then we start with number one and we go through and we play everything. Slowly you start taking songs off and you start to see your set come together.”

Fleetwood Mac’s tour begins on October. 3rd in Tulsa, Oklahoma., with the first leg wrapping up with two nights at the Forum in Los Angeles on December. 11th and 13th.

The 1975 eponymous album by Fleetwood Mac (that features the current line-up) will be reissued as a five-disc super deluxe edition in January 2018.  The original album is newly remastered and features on CD and vinyl LP in the box set. The CD also includes the original single mixes of Over My Head, Rhiannon, Say You Love Me and Blue Letter.  Like the previous Fleetwood Mac sets there’s plenty of unreleased outtakes, the super deluxe features a completely alternate version of the album (none of it ever released before), along with a handful of live tracks and a couple of jam/instrumentals. Released in 1975, Fleetwood Mac will be given a special reissue treatment . The album — the first to feature the quintet Lindsey Buckingham, Mick Fleetwood,Christine McVieJohn McVie, and Stevie Nicks — featured the hits and live staples “Landslide” (Nicks), “Rhiannon” (Nicks), “Monday Morning” (Buckingham), and “Over My Head” (Christine McVie).

Fleetwood Mac photographed in 1976

The third CD features 14 live tracks (all previously unreleased) while disc four is a DVD which features a 5.1 surround sound mix of Fleetwood Mac, a hi-res stereo version of the album and those four single versions.

Completing the set is the LP version of the original album pressed on 180-gram vinyl. The packaging sounds consistent with what was issued for previous albums (Rumours, Tusk, Mirage and Tango In The Night) since this comes in a 12″ x 12″ embossed sleeve with in-depth sleeve notes and new interviews with all the band members.

This five-disc Fleetwood Mac box set will be released on 19th January from Warner Bros. Records. A two-CD expanded edition featuring the first two discs in the box will also be issued.

Fleetwood Mac will release an expansive, 30th anniversary edition of their 14th studio album, 1987’s Tango in the Night, on March 10th via Warner Bros. Records. The reissue is packaged in three formats: a one-CD set featuring remastered audio, an expanded two-CD version with rare and unreleased recordings and a deluxe version featuring three CDs, a 180-gram LP and a DVD with music videos and a high-resolution version of the album.

Christine McVie Singer-songwriter looks back on heady days at Château d’Hérouville, discusses band’s future plans
With Tango in the Night, Fleetwood Mac fully immersed themselves in the decade’s glossy production style. Showcasing the diverse styles of primary songwriters Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie, the 12-track LP spawned a quartet of hit singles: “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Everywhere” and “Little Lies.” Their second highest-selling album behind 1977 masterwork Rumours, it remains the group’s final studio project with the classic quintet line-up of Buckingham, Nicks, McVie, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood.
The deluxe and expanded reissues features a disc of 13 previously unheard recordings, including an alternate version of shimmering Christine McVie ballad “Mystified,” a demo of Buckingham’s epic, percussion-heavy title-track and rare B-sides “Down Endless Street” and “Ricky.” The deluxe edition offers a third disc with 14 12-inch mixes – including dub versions of “Seven Wonders and “Everywhere” – and a DVD with videos of “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Little Lies,” “Family Man” and “Everywhere.”
Buckingham and Christine McVie recently announced an album of duets tentatively titled Buckingham McVie. The set, which features contributions from John McVie and Fleetwood, is loosely slated for a May release.

Fleetwood Mac have spent the past few years reissuing their peerless back catalogue in the obligatory remastered, expanded, deluxe editions. Last year brought us the 1982 album “Mirage” which somehow managed to make an album already slathered in cocaine sound even more cokey, all sheen and shine.

Next up is Tango in the Night, coming out on Warner on 10th March, They’ve got this early, unreleased version of the Stevie Nicks track Seven Wonders for you. It’s longer but also a little harsher than the album version, drawing out the fatalism of the chorus and de-emphasising the keyboard hook.

Tango in the Night came out five years after Mirage, and had originally been planned as a Lindsay Buckingham solo record – Nicks spent only two weeks in the studio with the band because she was concentrating on her solo career. Be thankful that it became a full-band record, because the album became defined not by his songs but by the contributions of the other writers; without the two singles from Christine McVie“Everywhere” and “Little Lies” – it would be a very different record. While many Mac fans might have their favourite writer in the group, it takes all three of Buckingham, Nicks and McVie to balance the group.

That balance is what makes Tango in the Night so great. For all that the music is of a piece – sophisticated, slick, without ever being over-complicated – it manages to shift through moods effortlessly. Buckingham is on edge throughout and has explained that Big Love, his single from the album, gets misinterpreted: when he sings that he is “looking out for love”, he doesn’t mean he is looking for love, he is putting himself on guard for it. In the title track, he’s restless, discomfited (“Try to sleep, sleep won’t come”); Caroline upbraids a woman who is crazy and lazy; Family Man seems to be a hymn to domestic stability, but even then he can’t help observing that “the road gets tough”.

McVie’s songs appear much more straightforward. “Everywhere” is a simple, gorgeous statement of love; “Little Lies” its counterpart, the realisation that the feelings of Everywhere depend on self-deception. Nicks’s are neither straightforward, nor angry: Welcome to the Room … Sara was written after treatment at the Betty Ford clinic, and uncertainty echoes throughout her contributions (“If I see you again / Will it be the same?” she asks on When I See You Again. “If I see you again / Will it be over?”), and “Seven Wonders” exemplifies that, with Nicks confronting the notion that even living to see the seven wonders will never match what she has lost.

Fleetwood Mac – Tango in the Night

Reissue Track List (Deluxe Edition)
Disc One: Original Album – 2017 Remaster
1. “Big Love”
2. “Seven Wonders”
3. “Everywhere”
4. “Caroline”
5. “Tango In The Night”
6. “Mystified”
7. “Little Lies”
8. “Family Man”
9. “Welcome To The Room… Sara”
10. “Isn’t It Midnight”
11. “When I See You Again”
12. “You And I, Part II”
Disc Two: B-Sides, Outtakes, Sessions
1. “Down Endless Street”
2. “Special Kind Of Love” (Demo)*
3. “Seven Wonders” (Early Version)*
4. “Tango In The Night” (Demo)*
5. “Mystified” (Alternate Version)*
6. “Book Of Miracles” (Instrumental)
7. “Where We Belong” (Demo)*
8. “Ricky”
9. “Juliet” (Run-Through)*
10. “Isn’t It Midnight” (Alternate Mix)*
11. “Ooh My Love” (Demo)*
12. “Mystified” (Instrumental Demo)*
13. “You And I, Part I & II” (Full Version)*
*Previously Unissued
Disc Three: The 12″ Mixes
1. “Big Love” (Extended Remix)
2. “Big Love” (House On The Hill Dub)
3. “Big Love” (Piano Dub)
4. “Big Love” (Remix/Edit)
5. “Seven Wonders” (Extended Version)
6. “Seven Wonders” (Dub)
7. “Little Lies” (Extended Version)
8. “Little Lies” (Dub)
9. “Family Man” (Extended Vocal Remix)
10. “Family Man” (I’m A Jazz Man Dub)
11. “Family Man” (Extended Guitar Version)
12. “Family Party” (Bonus Beats)
13. “Everywhere” (12″ Version)
14. “Everywhere” (Dub)
Disc Four: The Videos (DVD)
1. “Big Love”
2. “Seven Wonders”
3. “Little Lies”
4. “Family Man”
5. “Everywhere”
(Plus a High-Resolution Stereo Mix of the Original Album)

belladonna

Rhino released Stevie Nicks‘ first two solo albums as multi-disc deluxe editions in November 2016. Bella Donna (1981) and The Wild Heart (1983)  both feature newly remastered audio and previously unreleased studio and live recordings…

Stevie Nicks herself has been very involved in the reissues: “I’ve had so much fun reliving the making of Bella Donna and The Wild Heart while working on the liner notes and listening to all of the alternate versions and demo takes,” she said. “The liner notes are so much more than liner notes. They are like a little novel. I tried to make whoever reads this feel like they were there. I think…I succeeded….”

Produced by Jimmy Iovine and Tom Petty, Bella Donna was a massive success and features the songs “Edge Of Seventeen”, “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” (with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) and “Leather And Lace” (with Don Henley). The 2016 deluxe edition is a three-CD set with the unreleased material (plus two cuts from soundtracks) on disc 2. The third CD focuses on live material.

Back in 1981, Stevie Nicks took a risk and released her first solo album titled Bella Donna. Although the album was a her first work outside of Fleetwood Mac, and many questioned if she could hold her own as a solo artist, the album ended up being well perceived and achieved massive success.

The opening title track of the album, “Bella Donna,” was one of the proudest moments of the album. After a long search, we have dug up, and uncovered an alternative version of the song! This version is more of a studio outtake and demo, but there are some slight differences from the original. The most noticeable difference being, this version is a little more stripped back. It contains less guitars and more synths, therefore you can hear Stevie’s voice a lot clearer. There are other slight differences you may notice throughout the song as well!

“‘Bella Donna’ is a term of endearment I use and the title is about making a lot of decisions in my life, making a change based on the turmoil in my soul. You get to a certain age where you want to slow down, be quieter. The title song was basically a warning to myself and a question to others. I’m thirty-three years old, and my life has been very up and down in the last six years.”– Stevie Nicks, 1981.

The Wild Heart couldn’t quite repeat the chart-topping success of its predecessor, but it still did very well, peaking at number five on the US album chart. The deluxe is a two-CD set and features unreleased versions of All The Beautiful Worlds and Dial The Number amongst the bonus material.

The Bella Donna and The Wild Heart deluxe editions released on 4th November 2016. The remastered albums (without bonus tracks) will be reissued on vinyl too.

Bella Donna deluxe edition

CD 1
1. Bella Donna (Remastered)
2. Kind of Woman (Remastered)
3. Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around (with Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers) [Remastered]
4. Think About It (Remastered)
5. After The Glitter Fades (Remastered)
6. Edge of Seventeen (Remastered)
7. How Still My Love (Remastered)
8. Leather And Lace (Remastered) – Stevie Nicks & Don Henley
9. Outside The Rain (Remastered)
10. The Highwayman (Remastered)

CD 2
1. Edge of Seventeen (Early Take)
2. Think About It (Alternate Version)
3. How Still My Love (Alternate Version)
4. Leather And Lace (Alternate Version)
5. Bella Donna (Demo)
6. Gold And Braid (Unreleased Version)
7. Sleeping Angel (Alternate Version)
8. If You Were My Love (Unreleased Version)
9. The Dealer (Unreleased Version)
10. Blue Lamp (From “Heavy Metal”) [Remastered]
11. Sleeping Angel (From “Fast Times At Ridgemont High”) [Remastered]

CD 3
1. Gold Dust Woman (Live 1982) [Remastered]
2. Gold And Braid (Live 1982) [Remastered]
3. I Need To Know (Live 1982) [Remastered]
4. Outside The Rain (Live 1982) [Remastered]
5. Dreams (Live 1982) [Remastered]
6. Angel (Live 1982)
7. After The Glitter Fades (Live 1982) [Remastered]
8. Leather And Lace (Live 1982)
9. Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around (Live 1982) [Remastered]
10. Bella Donna (Live 1982)
11. Sara (Live 1982) [Remastered]
12. How Still My Love (Live)
13. Edge Of Seventeen (Live 1982) [Remastered]
14. Rhiannon (Live 1982) [Remastered]

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Tom Petty is headlining one of the British summertime shows this July. Following great trips over the past few years to The Rolling Stones, Neil Young and The Who we’re thrilled to be heading back to one of the great summer events.

These festivals are brilliantly organised and we would highly recommend upgrading to Gold or Diamond VIP packages.

These gives you access to the VIP summer garden area which offers a selection of exclusive bars, restaurants, comfy seating (and toilets without long queues :-))

Diamond VIP includes access to a small pit right in the very front of the main stage.

Gold VIP includes access to a secondary pit just behind the Diamond section
check out Badlands

Stevie Nicks has dedicated a rare demo of “Touched By An Angel” to the lives lost in Orlando. 🌹 “Sometimes~ In a difficult situation, a song from the past will call out to me. Concerning what happened in Orlando~ I hope these words might be comforting to those involved. I dedicate “Touched by an Angel” to all those lost~ and all those left behind. I have included the original demo because it is my favorite version. This was my mothers favorite song~ All my love, Stevie Nicks,

Sometimes~ In a difficult situation, a song from the past will call out to me. Concerning what happened in Orlando~ I hope these words might be comforting to those involved…

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This past Friday, February 26th, the “Shake It Out” singer took to the stage Florence and the Machine performing Fleetwood Mac’s “Silver Springs” at St. John at Hackney church in London during a benefit for War Child a pitch-perfect. Florence recorded Live at St John at Hackney in London, on February 26th, 2016.

Florence + The Machine never ceases to amaze us with their stunning performances. Whether it’s originals or covers we’re always grateful to hear Florence Welch’s powerhouse vocals. This weekend we got an extra special performance in the form of a brand new cover from the band. They treated us to a stripped down version of the Stevie Nicks’ penned “Silver Springs” from Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours album.

To support War Child UK. The London based charity aids children that have been affected by war across the world. In conjunction with O2, the charity puts on small benefit concerts across London as part of their Passport to the BRITs events. Multiple British artists put on performances to raise money and awareness for this worthy cause, Also the event included Lianne La Havas, Bloc Party, and Above & Beyond.

FLEETWOOD MAC: IN CONCERT

Vinyl debut, Triple-LP Collection Features 22 Live Recordings From The Band’s 1979-80 Tour, That Were Previously Available Only As Part Of The Tusk: Deluxe Edition, Available On March 4th From Warner Bros. Records

Fleetwood Mac unveiled a massive Deluxe Edition of its revered double album Tusk late last year that featured 22 previously unreleased live performances selected from the band’s 1979-80 tour. Until now, those concert recordings have only been available as part of the set and only on CD and digitally. That will change soon with the release of FLEETWOOD MAC: IN CONCERT.

All of the live music from the 2015 reissue of Tusk will be available on March 4th from Warner Bros. Records as a three-LP set. Pressed on 180-gram vinyl, the albums will be presented in a tri-fold jacket.

Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks originally released Tusk in October of 1979. The Grammy® Award-nominated, double-album went onto sell more than four million copies worldwide and introduced fans to hits like “Sara,” “Think About Me,” and the title track.

The music heard on In Concert was recorded at four stops during the band’s 111-show world tour promoting Tusk. This new collection serves as a worthy companion to the classic 1980 album Live. Although a few songs are duplicated from that album, including “Say You Love Me,” “Landslide” and “Go Your Own Way,” each performance on In Concert is unique and taken from a different show.

In Concert boasts 10 songs not heard on Live, including “World Turning” from the Fleetwood Mac’s 1975 self-titled release, and “The Chain” from the band’s best-selling album Rumours (1977), a Grammy-award winning juggernaut that has sold more than 40 million copies.

Several songs from IN CONCERT were recorded at the Checkerdome in St. Louis just a month after the release of Tusk, and only seven shows into the tour. Those performances capture the band already in top form on songs like “Angel,” “Save Me A Place” and “What Makes You Think You’re The One.”

The rest of the performances were recorded several months later, including 11 songs from the band’s six-night stand at Wembley Arena in London in June 1980. Among the highlights are “That’s Enough For Me,” “Sisters Of The Moon,” and the Top 10 smash from Rumours, “You Making Loving Fun.”

FLEETWOOD MAC: IN CONCERT

LP Track Listing

Side One

1.Intro (Wembley, 06/26/80),2.“Say You Love Me”(Wembley, 06/26/80), 3.“The Chain” (Wembley, 06/20/80) 4.“Don’t Stop” (Wembley, 06/27/80), 5.“Dreams” (Wembley, 06/20/80)

Side Two

1.“Oh Well” (Wembley, 06/20/80), 2.“Rhiannon” (Tucson, 08/28/80), 3.“Over And Over” (St. Louis, 11/05/79), 4.“That’s Enough For Me” (Wembley, 06/21/80),

Side Three

1.“Sara” (Tucson, 08/28/80), 2.“Not That Funny” (St. Louis, 11/05/79), 3.“Tusk” (St. Louis, 11/05/79), 4.“Save Me A Place” (St. Louis, 11/05/79)

Side Four

1.“Landslide” (Omaha, 08/21/80), 2.“What Makes You Think You’re The One” (St. Louis, 11/05/79), 3.“Angel” (St. Louis, 11/05/79), 4.“You Make Loving Fun” (Wembley, 06/20/80)

Side Five

1.“I’m So Afraid” (St. Louis, 11/05/79), 2.“World Turning” (Wembley, 06/22/80)

Side Six

1.“Go Your Own Way” (Wembley, 06/22/80), 2.“Sisters Of The Moon” (Wembley, 06/22/80), 3.“Songbird” (Wembley, 06/27/80)

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Writing a great song is tricky enough, but writing a standout duet is an even more difficult bit of business than that. After all, you have to make room for two contrasting perspectives without pulling the song apart at the seams in the process. And, since the majority of duets are inter-gender, you have to be able to write believably for the opposite sex.

Most people would agree that Tom Petty pulled off one of the great duets in rock history when he penned “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” and joined Stevie Nicks on the justly celebrated recording. The only problem with that story is that the song wasn’t meant to be a duet at all.

As Petty recalled to author Paul Zollo in the book Conversations With Tom Petty, the Fleetwood Mac chanteuse was enamored with his music and wanted him to write a song for her. “Stevie came to me around ’78,” he said. “And she was this absolutely stoned-gone, huge fan. And it was her mission in life that I should write her a song. And we were a little wary of Stevie. We didn’t quite know whether to like Stevie or not, because we kind of saw this big corporate rock band, Fleetwood Mac, which was wrong, they were actually artistic people. But in those days, nobody trusted that sort of thing and we just kept thinking, ‘What does she want from us?’”

Nicks was persistent and Petty eventually attempted a song for Nicks to be included on her first solo album. He wrote a ballad called “Insider,” but when the two sang it together, Petty liked it so much he decided to keep it for himself. He included it on The Heartbreakers’ 1981 album Hard Promises, even using a line from the song to give the album its name.

At the time that this was occurring, Jimmy Iovine, who was Petty’s producer and also was lined up to produce Nicks’ album Bella Donna, asked Tom about another song from the Hard Promises sessions with lyrics by Petty and music by Heartbreaker guitarist Mike Campbell. The Heartbreakers (with Donald “Duck” Dunn filling in for the band’s usual bassist Ron Blair) had finished “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around,” right down to Petty’s lead vocal, but Iovine persuaded him to give this track to Nicks after he had taken “Insider” back.

As a result, what you hear in the recording that became a #3 Billboard hit in 1981 is Nicks singing on top of the Heartbreakers recording. In the verses, Petty’s vocals, with the exception of a couple lines, were wiped away to make room for Nicks. To keep up the appearance of a duet, Nicks sang with Petty’s vocal in the refrain, actually taking the high harmony part since Petty already had the main vocal line covered.

The funny thing is that the song works better as a duet. It’s got a typically sturdy Heartbreakers foundation, featuring Campbell’s moaning guitar and Benmont Tench’s creeping keyboard. Nicks is right at home in this bluesy backdrop, imbuing Petty’s conversational lyrics with oodles of fiery attitude and a tinge of genuine hurt. “This doesn’t have to be the big get even,” she warns the guy who comes “knocking on my front door” with the “same old line.” “It doesn’t have to be anything at all.”

Having Nicks take the lead puts an interesting spin on the cautionary lines from the final verses (“Make a meal of some bright-eyed kid/ You need someone looking after you.”) Normally this would be the thing that the older guy would say to the young girl, maybe even in condescending fashion. Since it’s the woman making that statement, it levels the playing field. The guy is reduced to telling her that he’s onto the fact that, though she might be protesting at the moment, she’s the one who’s making the decision to leave: “I know you really want to tell me goodbye/ I know you really want to be your own girl.”

Petty’s lyrics are stinging and evocative in the run up to the refrain: “Baby you could never look me in the eye/ Yeah you buckle with the weight of the words.” The play on the phrase “weight of the world” is telling, because that’s the kind of pressure this fading relationship seems to be exerting on the principals. It all leads up to the title’s desperate plea for mercy, Petty and Nicks both going to the top of their registers to highlight the urgency, “Stop draggin’ my/ Stop draggin’ my/ Stop draggin’ my heart around.”

There are so many tantalizing hypothetical scenarios here. Would Petty’s solo vocal take have become quite as big a hit? Would Nicks have taken the intensely personal “Insider” and made it universal as well? As always, fate has the final answer. And the answer is that, to reach its full potential, “Stop Draggin My Heart Around” simply needed two to tango.

Caught On Tape: Fleetwood Mac Hit The Studio, And Their “Gypsy” Demo Is Unbelievable | Society Of Rock Videos

Fleetwood Mac are one of the only bands whose rarities and outtakes are good enough to make us wish they’d included them on each albums, This rare demo version of ‘Gypsy’ is absolutely beautiful; instead of a full band behind Stevie Nicks, she’s accompanied by only an electric keyboard playing softly in the background, giving ‘Gypsy’ an ethereal, almost dreamlike feel to it.

There are two points of inspiration behind ‘Gypsy’, as stated by Stevie Nicks. The first of which is a point of nostalgia for Nicks: her life before Fleetwood Mac, and the second being a tribute to someone’s passing.

Stevie Nicks wrote this as a tribute to her friend Robin who at the time wa dying from leukemia.

This demo of ‘Gypsy’ is one that very well could have stood on its own as a track on the album, or even as a B-side. Especially knowing that it’s about a dear friend of Stevie’s, the ethereal factor would have definitely worked as opposed to something a little more upbeat. In any event, ‘Gypsy’ still remains one of our favorite Fleetwood Mac songs, in any of its forms!

Stevie Nicks wrote the song originally around. 1979, and the earliest demo recordings were recorded in early 1980 with Tom Moncrieff for possible inclusion on her solo debut “Bella Donna”.  However, when Nicks’ friend Robin Anderson died of  leukemia, the song took on a new significance and Nicks held it over for Fleetwood Mac. “Gypsy” was the second single release and second biggest hit from the “Mirage” album,

The video for this song was the highest-budget music video ever produced at the time. It used several locations including a highly detailed portrayal of a forest, and required many costumes and dancers.

Stevie Nicks especially remembers the experience as unpleasant. Two weeks beforehand, she had gone into rehab to attempt to end her cocaine addiction. However, the video shoot could not be rescheduled, and she had to take a break for it. Near the end of the first of three days, she was exhausted and said she wanted some cocaine. A small bottle that was discreetly brought to her was later thrown out before she could use any.

Those issues were further strained by having to work closely with former boyfriend, Lindsay Buckingham. “We weren’t getting along well then. I didn’t want to be anywhere near him; I certainly didn’t want to be in his arms,” she says of the scene where the two are dancing. “If you watch the video, you’ll see I wasn’t happy. And he wasn’t a very good dancer.

On March 25, 2009 during a show in Montreal on Fleetwood Mac’s Unleashed Tour, Stevie Nicks gave a short history of the inspiration behind Gypsy. She explained it was written sometime in 1978-79, when the band had become “very famous, very fast,” and it was a song that brought her back to an earlier time, to an apartment in San Francisco where she had taken the mattress off her bed and put it on the floor. To contextualize, she voiced the lyrics: “So I’m back, to the velvet underground. Back to the floor, that I love. To a room with some lace and paper flowers. Back to the gypsy that I was.” Those are the words: ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’—which is a clothing store in downtown San Francisco, where Janis Joplin got her clothes, and Grace Slick from Jefferson Airplane. It was this little hole in the wall, amazing, beautiful stuff—’back to the floor that I love, to a room with some lace and paper flowers, back to the gypsy that I was.'”