Posts Tagged ‘Nick Sanborn’

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Flock Of Dimes (the solo project of Wye Oak’s Jenn Wasner) will release her new album “Head of Roses”, on April 2nd via Sub Pop Records. Here’s the first single. Her most recent solo project as Flock of Dimes was the EP Like So Much Desire, which also came out last year on Sub Pop. The video for her new single “Two.” The release coincides with an announcement by Wasner that her forthcoming album Head of Roses . Check out the Lola B. Pierson and Cricket Arrison-directed video for “Two,”. 

Directors Pierson and Arrison speak about the “Two” video in a press release: “The world of the video shows two humans during three consecutive days. One human lives her life from morning to night, the other from night to morning. In the middle of the day they meet and the next day begins. By exploring dichotomies (natural/artificial, day/night, everyday/majestic) the work points to the pain caused by categorization and the joy of unification.”

Wasner adds: “‘Two’ is about trying to find a kind of balance between independence and interdependence, and the multitudes within ourselves. It’s about trying to reconcile the desire to maintain a sense of personal autonomy and freedom with the need to connect deeply with others. And it’s about struggling to feel at home in a body, and learning how to accept that the projection of self that you show to others will always be incomplete. I made this video with an incredible team of generous and talented people, including some very dear old friends. I think what we made captures the spirit of the song perfectly—the sense of delight and wonder at the absurd beauty of everyday life, and the true moments of spontaneous joy that can erupt in those rare moments when you catch a glimpse of yourself the way others see you.”

Head of Roses was produced by Nick Sanborn (Sylvan Esso) and Wasner. which comes out on April 2nd via Sub Pop.

Sylvan Esso is Amelia Randall Meath and Nick Sanborn. A Band. With the swift demise of concerts as we know them this year, the live album has taken on a significance it’s not enjoyed for the better part of a half-century. So lucky were we that Sylvan Esso released “With” and its accompanying concert film a month into what felt like the end of everything good. Calling on a row of musician-friends hailing from Landlady, Hand Habits, Bon Iver, Mountain Man, and Mr Twin Sister, the already-great-live duo burn through a jaw-dropping set that recasts their catalogue with the warmth of eight further beating hearts, giving fans less of a reason to mourn the shows that could not be, but rather a glimmer of those to look forward to yet. 

Surprise! Our new “With Love” EP, featuring songs from the extra special From The Satellite performance, is available for streaming. Like its sister record “With” this album reimagines Sylvan Esso’s works as a full band, adding new layers and textures to these classic songs. The live version of “Free” at the end of this is hauntingly, intimately perfect. Twenty minutes and fifty eight seconds of sublime joy. The big band Sylvan Esso vibe is the finest thing there is.

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This tour existed only to exist, not to promote a new album or celebrate a milestone. No, Sylvan Esso simply wanted to do something fun. For themselves, for their fans, and for us, their friends, who got easily roped into being in the ten piece band. We were all sent the song list in advance, with just a few written ideas of what some of us could do on each song, but largely it all remained open for interpretation and when we convened in the house to rehearse in Durham for the first time. On the first day we played the song “Wolf,” checking the pulse of the band, how would we sound together, how would we arrange together, and how much homework did everyone actually do? The first take of that song put everyone immediately at ease and also turned up the temperature. Because it went really well. We knew how good this could sound, how different it could be from the original recordings and how special that would feel for the crowd, and for us. “Wolf” ended up being the first song in the set. “Wolf” became the anchor, before the rocket ship would take off each night. Yes I know I made a boat analogy early. And now I’ve shifted to space. That’s an accurate representation of how this show ended up.

The first four days we would just keep chipping away at songs, written on a large piece of butcher paper on the wall in fat marker, and we’d cross them off one by one as we hit them. The first day was a dream because we learned five songs and they all sounded great. The second day was impossible, because we had to learn five more songs, and then suddenly the songs from the first day weren’t so perfect anymore. That’s the big problem with getting better. Your ceiling goes up, the standards rise, and the goods can always keep improving, which means, in more pessimistic terms, it can always also keep sounding worse. There were twenty songs to learn, so there was a lot of bucking and bobbing back and forth between feeling over-confident and supremely challenged. Sometimes that had to do with how hungry we were.

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After the family style rehearsals concluded, we headed to Los Angeles for tech rehearsal. To get there involved thirteen of us, band and crew, flying on an airplane. Thirteen people each checking three bags. Thirteen people moving through the airport together is insane. It’s like a school trip. After the tour was done Nick and Amelia remarked on how ridiculous it was that we didn’t do any warm-up shows, how insane it was that we jumped into the fire at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, a Frank Gehry designed space for the LA Philharmonic where a portion of the audience sits behind you. But we did it. For over two thousand people on night one, we did it, and we did it surprisingly well. We had our expectations set to cautious, because sometimes the first show can be a true disaster, it almost is supposed to be, but everyone cared so much and worked so hard and the stakes felt so high that somehow a meltdown just didn’t happen. 

The last two shows were homecoming shows in Durham, a little different feeling from the classic theatres, and these were the shows that were filmed for what you’re seeing here and now. I’m excited to watch it just so I can see the light show from the front. We were so sad when it ended but there wasn’t a formal goodbye. Folks trickled off to go home, and a bunch of us watched a movie the next day. It’s implied that we will be together again, we’re just not sure how or when. Those of us who don’t live in North Carolina feel ourselves threatening ourselves to move there, but I don’t see it happening for me. I like being called to serve and being swept into the vortex, then returning home to wait for the next vortex to assemble

Sylvan Esso, Sylvan Esso With Love, Sylvan Esso Spotify, Sylvan Esso Live, Sylvan Esso 2020, Sylvan Esso Love, Sylvan Esso spotify, Sylvan Esso youtube, Sylvan Esso tickets, Sylvan Esso members

Electro-pop duo Sylvan Esso released a new six-track EP on Wednesday, entitled “With Love”. The latest project from singer Amelia Meath and electronic instrumentalist Nick Sanborn arrived unannounced via Loma Vista Recordings and features reimagined versions of six songs from their recent Free Love LP, which arrived in late September, featuring a mix of guest musicians.

“Getting the WITH band back together a year after our original tour (and in most cases, the last shows any of us played) was such an unexpected joy in a year where all other plans fell through,” the duo said in a press statement to go with the album’s arrival. “We are immensely grateful to everyone who worked so hard to help us make this safe and possible, and to everyone out there who listens. Thank you.”

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The aforementioned band featured on the “With Love” recordings was comprised of a mix of musicians and singers including Adam Schatz (Landlady), Alexandra Sauser-Monnig (Mountain Man), Dev Gupta (Mr. Twin Sister), Jenn Wasner (Wye Oak, Flock of Dimes), Matt McCaughan (Bon Iver), Meg Duffy (Hand Habits), Molly Sarlé (Mountain Man), and Yan Westerlund.

Along with the album, the band has also shared their official live video for their reimagined take on “Numb”, as performed during their recent From the Satellite three-part virtual concert series. 

Electronic duo and festival favourites Sylvan Esso will release their highly anticipated third LP later this month, and it feels like the perfect time to receive their buoyant, joyful, dance-inducing music. “It’s a record about being increasingly terrified of the world around you and looking inward to remember all the times when loving other people seemed so easy, so that you can find your way back to that place,” the pair said in a statement. Sylvan Esso is made up of Amelia Meath (who you also may know from her folk project Mountain Man) and producer Nick Sanborn. Their music has become increasingly polished over the years, first catching fire with more ambient songs like “Hey Mami” and “Coffee” on their 2014 self-titled debut and following it with 2017’s more pop-forward What Now. Free Love seems to position them somewhere in between those two sounds. Single “Ferris Wheel” is tremendously fun, but it’s also weirdly cleansing. Meath describes this phenomenon best: “Nick wants things to sound unsettling, but I want you to take your shirt off and dance.” There you have it.

We are thrilled to announce our third album, Free Love, will be out 9.25.20
It’s a record about being increasingly terrified of the world around you and looking inward to remember all the times when loving other people seemed so easy, so that you can find your way back to that place.
This first single, Ferris Wheel, is about discovering your power and awkwardly figuring out how to wield it. It’s for the summer, it’s for you, we hope you like it.

Nick Sanborn and Amelia Meath

Sylvan Esso  Nick Sanborn and Amelia Meath have shared a new single from their forthcoming album Free Love. “Frequency” arrives with an accompanying music video directed and styled by the group’s friend and collaborator Moses Sumney. Free Love marks Sylvan Esso’s third studio album, following the duo’s 2014 self-titled debut and 2017’s What Now. The new LP is out September 25 via Loma Vista, and it includes previously-shared tracks “Ferris Wheel” and “Rooftop Dancing.”

The video for “Frequency” was choreographed by North Carolina-based Stewart/Owen Dance. Of the visual, Sylvan Esso said in a press release:

We had a fantastic and rewarding time collaborating with our friend and fellow North Carolinian, Moses Sumney, on building a visual world for “Frequency.” He had such a beautiful vision for the project, one that ran parallel to the song’s initial source in a way that showed us new spaces it could inhabit. It’s a beautiful exploration of being together and apart at the same time—we feel it rings clearly in this moment.

New album Free Love out on September 25th

Indie pop darlings Sylvan Esso have revealed they will drop their third album “Free Love” on September. 25th. Sylvan Esso is Amelia Randall Meath and Nick Sanborn. What started out in LA with Jon Hill and was finished back in North Carolina at Sylvan Esso’s home studio, Free Love asks major questions about self-image, self-righteousness, friendship, romance, and environmental calamity with enough warmth, playfulness, and magnetism to make you consider an alternate reality. These are Sylvan Esso’s most nuanced and undeniable songs—bold enough to say how they feel, big enough to make you join in that feeling.

“It’s a record about being increasingly terrified of the world around you and looking inward to remember all the times when loving other people seemed so easy, so that you can find your way back to that place,” the duo explained of the new LP in a press statement. This week, electronic duo Sylvan Esso announced their third studio album Free Love, out September. 25th via Loma Vista Recordings. Lead single “Ferris Wheel” is lush and bouncy—with synths keeping the song at a fun pace.

To give fans a taste of what to come, Sylvan Esso shared the lead single “Ferris Wheel” with the heat-wave appropriate opening lines, “August in the heat/ Sweaty in the street.”

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Releases September 25th, 2020

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Sylvan Esso have shared the video for a mysterious new track, “What If”: a brief, minimal and enticing track, just a minute and a half long. Over spacious synth-bleeps, Amelia Meath sings, “Oh life, dying out/ And the oceans turn to clouds.” The music slowly swells up behind her, but it never quite crests. In the “What If” video, we see Meath singing as her head bobs in the ocean. The camera rises up over her until she’s just a small spot amidst nothingness.

It’s been more than three years since Sylvan Esso dropped their sophomore LP What Now, and it’s been more than two years since “PARAD(w/m)E,” their last proper stand-alone single. Back in April, however, the electro-pop duo from Durham, NC, premiered their concert film “With” on YouTube, while they surprised fans with an accompanying live album of the same name, via Loma Vista Recordings.

Both the album and film capture the final two nights of the band’s 2019 WITH tour at the Durham Performing Arts Center, in which Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn were joined by a 10-piece band. The film also offers a behind-the-scenes look at the musicians as they prepare for the tour. The 16-track live album spans material from Sylvan Esso’s two studio albums – their self-titled 2014 debut and their acclaimed 2017 LP, What Now. In support of “With”, the duo performed an intimate three-song set from their home for NPR’s Tiny Desk (Home) Concert series.

Amelia Meath (formerly of Mountain Man) and Nick Sanborn (Megafaun, Made Of Oak) formed Sylvan Esso in 2013. They made their debut with the single “Hey Mami” and released their eponymous debut album on Partisan Records on May, 2014, which reached No. 39 on the Billboard 200. They released their second album What Now on April, 2017,

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Grammy-nominated electro duo Sylvan Esso live-debuted a new tune on last night’s Jimmy Kimmel Live!, performing “PARAD(w/m)E” (just pronounced “parade”) and following up with a lyric video for the track on Friday.

Amber Coffman (formerly of Dirty Projectors) and Wye Oak’s Jenn Wasner contributed backing vocals (and claps) for Sylvan Esso’s Kimmel performance. “P-a-r-a-d with me,” Amelia Meath commands over a characteristically bouncy Nick Sanborn beat. Take a closer listen, however, and “PARAD(w/m)E” reveals itself to be as dark as it is danceable.

Sylvan Esso’s strong sophomore album What Now earned the duo a Grammy nod for best dance/electronic album, and rightfully so. Kayleigh Hughes hailed What Now’s “fuller, darker, and more chaotic sound” .

Watch Sylvan Esso’s “PARAD(w/m)E” lyric video below, The duo has an extensive 2018 tour planned.

When you listen to Sylvan Esso singer and lyricist Amelia Meath talk about the band’s new album, “What Now”, you quickly learn how profoundly she’s motivated by love. There’s the love of magical sounds and the euphoria she feels when music “lifts you off the earth.” There’s the love for the audience, of connecting with and freeing them through song. And, especially for Meath, there’s the love of dance and of feeling the body (literally) become the music.

The release of What Now, we asked Meath to share some of the stories behind the new songs. She revealed a lot about what went into each track, but also reflected on the kinds of things that can keep her up at night, like whether being in a band matters when there’s more important work to do, how she’s sometimes sad when everything is awesome and how flagrant sexism in the music industry can ruin everything.

“Lyrically, this is mostly me talking to myself. Hilariously enough this song is on the radio now, but at the time I was feeling an immense amount of pressure to write new songs for What Now even though we were still mid-cycle on our first record. Most of the song is spent accusing myself of trying to become a successful musician when there are so many other important things to be doing other than sucking up to the man, trying to get America to think you are cool. Also — getting on mainstream radio is like trying to join a secret society, particularly if you are female. Stations have literally come back to us saying that they already have ‘a female vocal’ in their playlist.

5. Kick Jump Twist

“This is about jumping through hoops trying to get people to love you. Be it practicing your dance moves and sexy face in the mirror, or prepping your audition for RuPaul’s Drag Race. It’s a song about how we perform our lives — and also, about being in a band and touring forever.”

6. Song

“My favorite manifestation of heartache is wanting to be a piece of music. As in, actually being so filled with emotion and energy that you leave your human body and transcend into pure melody. For real. That is what this tune is about, as well as the reality of being in love versus what love songs and rom-coms tell us love is like — how sometimes a song can make you feel more in love than the real thing. Or at least it gives you a moment to completely feel it, without distraction.”

7. Just Dancing

“I wanted to talk about how Tinder has made it possible to only go on first dates forever. How all of the sudden it is completely possible to be in control of how potential romantic partners see you. How if you wanted to, you could be your own most ideal version of yourself. But you would have to keep on changing who you were dating to keep that beginning of a relationship feeling. How you could live in this false image of yourself, reflected through your partners’ eyes, never landing.”

8. Signal

“It’s about life mimicking technology and technology mimicking life. Searching for truth and honesty in a sea of noise. How, despite all the changes to the ways we go about it, we all still want the same thing any human has ever wanted: to be, connect with other humans and feel understood.

9. Slack Jaw

“Everything is awesome — and I am still sad.”

10. Rewind

“This is about me watching scenes from movies over and over again when I was a kid, learning turns of phrases and dance moves, and how to be a person. The chorus is about repeated viewings on VHS — how when you are rewinding something the picture dims and when you press ‘play,’ the room floods with light again. It is about building your personality from media, and then slowly dismantling it to become an honest human and an amalgamation of your influences from family, friends, movies, music and idols.”

Sylvan Esso, What Now

Three years removed from their debut, the indie electro-pop duo of singer Amelia Meath and producer Nick Sanborn returned with a denser sound and a very different goal than the blissfully direct objective of “making people dance.” The band called What Now a representation of “the inevitable low that comes after every high.” Indeed, Meath and Sanborn dispense with many of the freeing and expansive sounds of their debut,

Sylvan Esso’s spangly electro-pop songs can throb joyfully, even ecstatically. But on “What Now”, even the brashest bashers — “The Glow,” “Kick Jump Twist,” et al — are deepened by the gently reflective ballads that surround them. As producer Nick Sanborn gives weight to the soft static in “Slack Jaw,” for example, Amelia Meath sings of the way being in love can produce a strangely humbling sense of awe: “I got all the parts I’ve wished for / I’ve got everything I need / Sometimes I’m above water / But mostly I’m at sea.”

As its title suggests, What Now fixates heavily on aftermaths, whether it documents music-industry pressures in the grabby “Radio” or, in “Die Young,” faces down a logistical complication Meath hadn’t anticipated: “I was gonna die young / Now I gotta wait for you.” But the album feels most of all like a celebration — of connection, of commitment and acceptance, of movement and sound and the liberation that comes with letting love in.