Posts Tagged ‘John McVie’

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Fleetwood Mac’s legendary three night performance at the Boston Tea Party, all in one vinyl box set.

Madfish Records presents Fleetwood Mac’s legendary Boston concert recordings from an earlier era of the band’s colourful history, featuring the classic blues line-up of Mick Fleetwood, Peter Green, Danny Kirwan, John McVie and Jeremy Spencer.

Originally recorded at the Boston Tea Party venue over three nights in February 1970, for a planned release later the same year, these recordings were left in the can, unissued, following leader Peter Green’s sudden decision to leave the band a few weeks after the dates.  Tracks from the shows were eventually released in various forms in the mid-80s but these releases were blighted by poor sound sources. The discovery of the original 8-track tapes and a number of previously unreleased tracks in the late 90s allowed the material to be re-mixed, re-mastered, and substantially overhauled for release on 3 separate CD volumes.

In 2013 the current incarnation of Fleetwood Mac embarked on a massive world tour. Dates in North America were followed by gigs around Europe, with Australia and New Zealand planned shortly. The dates so far saw the band playing sold-out shows to huge arena crowds and created another surge of interest in this much-loved band. Boston is a 3CD set which collects live recordings from an earlier era of the band’s colourful history. The set features the classic blues line-up of Mick Fleetwood, Peter Green, Danny Kirwan, John McVie and Jeremy Spencer. The discovery of the original 8-track tapes and a number of previously unreleased tracks in the late 90s allowed the material to be re-mixed, re-mastered, and substantially overhauled for release on 3 separate CD volumes. This new set brings together all of these re-mastered recordings a 3CD set to present a complete document of these historic shows. The set is packaged in a clam box with a 24 page book. The booklet contains new sleeve notes and reworked artwork.

This new set brings together all of these re-mastered recordings for the first time as a 4LP box set, and a 3CD box set, presenting a complete document of these historic shows.

Fleetwood Mac, live at the Record Plant, San Francisco on 15th December 1974 Fleetwood Mac was in a state of flux in late 1974. Their new album “Heroes Are Hard To Find” had just appeared, but guitarist Bob Welch was about to depart and they were battling their former manager, who had put together a bogus version of the band. With Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks about to join, this fascinating set performed at the Record Plant on 15th December, for broadcast on KSAN-FM captures the previous line-up just before its collapse, on a superb set that spans early classics and more recent favorites. It s presented here with background notes and images.

Setlist:

1. The Green Manalishi (With The Two Prong Crown) 2. Angel 3. Spare Me A Little Of Your Love 4. Sentimental Lady 5. Future Games 6. Bermuda Triangle 7. Why 8. Believe Me 9. Black Magic Woman 10. Oh Well 11. Band intros > Rattlesnake Shake 12. Hypnotized 13. Mystery To Me

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Fleetwood Mac debuted their new revamped lineup by performing “The Chain” and “Gypsy” on Wednesday’s edition of The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

The televised appearance marked the longtime band’s first time playing live alongside guitarists Mike Campbell, formerly of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Crowded House’s Neil Finn, both of whom stepped in after Fleetwood Mac fired Lindsey Buckingham last April.

Both guitarists featured prominently in the performances, flanking to the left and right of Stevie Nicks; on both “The Chain” and “Gypsy,” Finn handled the vocal parts previously sung by Buckingham, particularly on “The Chain,” where Finn and Nicks showcased their budding vocal chemistry.

They played two classic songs, “The Chain” and “Gypsy,” which you can watch below.

Host Ellen DeGeneres introduced the group by saying that it’s sold more than 100 million albums and calling Fleetwood Mac “one of the most iconic bands in music.” Finn quickly answered fans’ questions about how his voice would fit in place of the departed Lindsey Buckingham by taking the lead on “The Chain.”

Campbell then switched guitars in order to play the song’s outro solo. For “Gypsy,” Campbell pulled double-duty, playing guitar as well as the song’s keyboard hook.

After “The Chain,” DeGeneres hugged Stevie Nicks and briefly spoke with the singer. The host acknowledged that it was a thrill to have them on her show because Fleetwood Mac usually don’t perform on TV.

Nicks introduced Finn and Campbell and promoted the band’s upcoming tour. DeGeneres added that her show is giving away a pair of tickets to every date. You fans can enter the contest at her website.

“There are 10 hits we have to do,” Nicks has previously said of the tour. “That leaves another 13 songs if you want to do a three-hour show. Then you crochet them all together and you make a great sequence and you have something that nobody has seen before except all the things they want to see are there. At rehearsal, we’re going to put up a board of 60 songs. Then we start with number one and we go through and we play everything. Slowly you start taking songs off and you start to see your set come together.”

Fleetwood Mac’s tour begins on October. 3rd in Tulsa, Oklahoma., with the first leg wrapping up with two nights at the Forum in Los Angeles on December. 11th and 13th.

Love That Burns

A Chronicle of Fleetwood Mac, Volume One: 1967–1974 by Mick Fleetwood

“I have dreamt of one day working to present a documentation of the early story of Fleetwood Mac. This moment has arrived! And I’m thrilled to be in the safe hands of Genesis Publications.” – Mick Fleetwood In 1967 Fleetwood Mac debuted at the Windsor Blues and Jazz Festival. 50 years later one of its founding members Mick Fleetwood documents the rocky beginnings of a band that emerged from what is now referred to as the British Blues Boom.

The Windsor Jazz & Blues Festival was Fleetwood Mac’s first official gig. It was such a significant musical gathering, like Paris was for artists in the 1920s.” – Mick Fleetwood

Mick Fleetwood is a self-taught drummer and a founding member of one of the most successful bands of the last 50 years, Fleetwood Mac. Released in 1968, their first album Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac came in at no.4 in the UK charts and brought the band overnight success. They went on to release the no.1 hit ‘Albatross’ and a series of critically acclaimed albums, with further hit singles including ‘Black Magic Woman’ and ‘Need Your Love So Bad’.

A constant in Fleetwood Mac’s frequently changing line-up, Mick Fleetwood took over management of the band two years before they released Rumours which – having sold over 40 million copies worldwide – remains one of the best-selling albums of all time.

Fleetwood Mac got famous so quickly; we were still playing small clubs even as we were becoming pop stars.” – Mick Fleetwood

This official limited edition chronicle, “LOVE THAT BURNS”, contains over 400 rare images and an original manuscript of over 20,000 words with exclusive contributions from early Fleetwood Mac band members including John and Christine McVie, Jeremy Spencer and the legendary Peter Green.

“The line ‘Please don’t leave me with a love that burns’ applies to a lot in the Fleetwood Mac journey. When Peter Green left the band, that’s how I felt – that the love would be irreplaceable, and in many ways it was.” – Mick Fleetwood

Love That Burns contains original manuscript from Mick Fleetwood recounting his childhood, early bands, Fleetwood Mac’s debut performance, first international tours, live gig antics, playing with blues legends at Chess Studios, the genius of Peter Green and the many talented members that formed Fleetwood Mac in the years before 1975.

Love That Burns features text commentaries by Peter Green, Christine McVie, John McVie, Jeremy Spencer, John Mayall, Mike Vernon, Sandra (Vigon) Elsdon and Jenny Boyd and is narrated with more than 20,000 words.

“Every page turned in this precious book reflects the efforts and life force of each band member that was part of this early journey that Fleetwood Mac took.” – Mick Fleetwood

Love That Burns features images from the Mick Fleetwood archives and various contributions from friends of the band including rare unpublished images, unseen archival material, and original illustrations by Jeremy Spencer.

Top photographers include Clive Arrowsmith, Henry Diltz, Bruno Ducourant, Bob Gruen, Jeff Lowenthal, Barry Plummer, Michael Putland, Dominique Tarle, Amalie Rothschild and Daniel Sullivan.

I have dreamt of one day working with Genesis to present a documentation of the early story of Fleetwood Mac – This moment has arrived! And I’m thrilled to be in the safe hands of Genesis Publications.” – Mick Fleetwood

Love That Burns is published in a numbered, limited edition of only 2,000 copies worldwide. Every hand bound book is individually signed by the author, Mick Fleetwood. Handcrafted in Milan, Italy, the limited edition is quarter bound in leather with foil blocking, yellow sprayed page edging and a padded cover featuring the Fleetwood Mac artwork of Sixties graphic artist, Günther Kieser.

An exclusive 7″ vinyl picture disc includes ‘Love That Burns’ from the 1968 album Mr Wonderful, and a rare instrumental track recorded in June 1967, entitled ‘Fleetwood Mac’, from which the band took it’s name.

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Bare Trees

“Bare Trees” is the sixth studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in March 1972. This is their last album to feature guitarist Danny Kirwan, who was fired during the album’s supporting tour.

To showcase Bare Trees, Fleetwood Mac went on tour with Savoy Brown and Long John Baldry during the Spring and Summer of ’72. The tour, billed as “The British are Coming” turned out to be a traumatic affair. On the road, Kirwan “just got more and more intense,” Fleetwood said. “He wouldn’t talk to anyone. He was going inside himself which we put down to an emotional problem that we had no idea about. We thought he was just being awkward. I had no idea he was struggling to that level.”

At one pivotal gig, Kirwan and Welch fought over tuning, to the point where the troubled guitarist refused to go on-stage. “That’s the cardinal thing you just don’t do,” Fleetwood said. “In essence, he had a breakdown.”

Kirwan smashed his guitar, then let the band struggle through their performance without him. Afterwards, he launched into a critique of their playing. “It was the straw that broke the camel’s back,” said Fleetwood. “That particular pain and story needed to stop.”

In the years before Fleetwood Mac became a household name, the British/American band spotlighted a succession of blues-inspired guitar aces, and on “Bare Trees”, that slot is held down by Danny Kirwan. “It’s a well-rounded album,” noted drummer Mick Fleetwood of the 1972 Reprise set. “Like Lindsey [Buckingham], Danny had the chops with layering techniques, and the ability to know what’s right and wrong in the studio.” Kirwan also penned half of the 10 songs here, including the terrific “Dust,” His “Sunny Side of Heaven” was an instrumental, which, at the time, was mixed in with some radio station sign-offs. “Danny’s Chant” features the use of wah-wah guitars, while the lyrics for Kirwan’s composition “Dust” were taken from a poem by Rupert Brooke.”Trinity”, another Kirwan song, was an outtake from the album that was subsequently released in 1992 on the 25 Years – The Chain box set.

Christine McVie and fellow guitarist Bob Welch also contribute winners in “Spare Me a Little of Your Love” and “Sentimental Lady,” respectively. If you have any interest in exploring the music of the Mac before the Buckingham-Nicks era, make Bare Trees your first stop.

Fleetwood Mac

  • Danny Kirwan – guitar, vocals
  • Bob Welch – guitar, vocals
  • Christine McVie – keyboards, vocals
  • John McVie – bass guitar
  • Mick Fleetwood – drums, percussion

The 1975 eponymous album by Fleetwood Mac (that features the current line-up) will be reissued as a five-disc super deluxe edition in January 2018.  The original album is newly remastered and features on CD and vinyl LP in the box set. The CD also includes the original single mixes of Over My Head, Rhiannon, Say You Love Me and Blue Letter.  Like the previous Fleetwood Mac sets there’s plenty of unreleased outtakes, the super deluxe features a completely alternate version of the album (none of it ever released before), along with a handful of live tracks and a couple of jam/instrumentals. Released in 1975, Fleetwood Mac will be given a special reissue treatment . The album — the first to feature the quintet Lindsey Buckingham, Mick Fleetwood,Christine McVieJohn McVie, and Stevie Nicks — featured the hits and live staples “Landslide” (Nicks), “Rhiannon” (Nicks), “Monday Morning” (Buckingham), and “Over My Head” (Christine McVie).

Fleetwood Mac photographed in 1976

The third CD features 14 live tracks (all previously unreleased) while disc four is a DVD which features a 5.1 surround sound mix of Fleetwood Mac, a hi-res stereo version of the album and those four single versions.

Completing the set is the LP version of the original album pressed on 180-gram vinyl. The packaging sounds consistent with what was issued for previous albums (Rumours, Tusk, Mirage and Tango In The Night) since this comes in a 12″ x 12″ embossed sleeve with in-depth sleeve notes and new interviews with all the band members.

This five-disc Fleetwood Mac box set will be released on 19th January from Warner Bros. Records. A two-CD expanded edition featuring the first two discs in the box will also be issued.

Atlantic

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie are just about ready to unveil their forthcoming album starting with the impending release of the set’s first single, “In My World,” this week.

Due April 14th, the “In My World” single officially starts the long-awaited lead up to Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, the duo project led by the Fleetwood Mac bandmates who rediscovered their creative bond after McVie had rejoined the band’s lineup in 2014. Scheduled for a June 9th release, the album offers what both partners see as the sensible and long-overdue culmination of a long-term partnership.

“We were exploring a creative process, and the identity of the project took on a life organically,” explained Buckingham in a press release. “The body of work felt like it was meant to be a duet album. We acknowledged that to each other on many occasions, and said to ourselves, ‘what took us so long?’”

“We’ve always written well together, Lindsey and I,” added McVie. “This has just spiraled into something really amazing that we’ve done between us.”

Tracked in Los Angeles, Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie serves as a Fleetwood Mac album of sorts; although singer Stevie Nicks was not involved, the duo worked with Mac rhythm section of Mick Fleetwood and John McVie , adding their distinctive “dynamic rhythmic engine” to the 10-song set.

The album’s release will be followed by a spate of what are being referred to as “special U.S. concerts.” they’re scheduled to begin June 21st and continue through July 27th Whether they’ll be performing with Fleetwood and John McVie is unknown, although it’s probably worth noting that Fleetwood Mac are booked to appear at festivals this summer.

The album was recorded at The Village Studios in Los Angeles (where Tusk was made) and Buckingham and McVie were “joined in the studio by fellow bandmates Mick Fleetwood and John McVie” which sounds very promising!

Speaking about the project, Lindsey had this to say: “We were exploring a creative process, and the identity of the project took on a life organically. The body of work felt like it was meant to be a duet album. We acknowledged that to each other on many occasions, and said to ourselves, ‘what took us so long?!!‘” Christine McVie describes the results of the collaboration as “really amazing”.

Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie will be issued on Atlantic Records on 9th June 2017.

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Just lately I often look at albums and songs I adored growing up as a teenager and cannot believe how long ago that is . I remember listening to Rumours following it through all of my life. It is an album that was blighted by drama as we all know, Christine McVie defined the recording sessions as nothing but drama and arguments and it is a surprise it got finished at all. Given that the band’s two couples Christine McVie and her husband John; Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks ,were embroiled in fights and conflict would have been enough to derail the recording process. As it was, the album Was made and stands as one of history’s greatest classic albums. Before looking at the background and its songs; Steve Nicks wrote Dreams in Sly Stone’s bed whilst credits his dyslexia for Go Your Own Way’s unusual drumming rhythm – there are a lot of other little-known facts you might not know about Rumours. Lindsey Buckingham’s sonic perfectionism meant his guitar was restrung every twenty minutes during Never Going Back Again; The Chain  the legendary epic and only song credited to all five band members – has Christine McVie’s song “Keep Me There” is at the core and was the foundations before other members of the band piled in and added their ideas to the song. John McVie’s ten-note bass passage tees the song whilst Mick Fleetwood’s impassioned percussion gives it its drive and fervency. Aside from the music, the infamous extra-marital affairs threatened to split Fleetwood Mac for good. Not only did some of the songs blatantly put these affairs at their heart – Christine McVie’s “You Make Loving Fun” about the lighting technician she was in a relationship with; Lindsey Buckingham’s “Go Your Own Way” a kiss-off and screw-you to Stevie Nicks. “Dreams” perhaps the centrepiece and most astonishing song on the album – struggled to get made and studio time was hard to come by as Buckingham’s iron first ruled the production.

Image result for fleetwood mac recording rumours

The drama in Fleetwood Mac heightened shortly after the release of “Rumours”, rehearsal time became even more sacred; they weren’t just running through songs they could play in their sleep, they were reinforcing a bond that only comes with watching songs come to life and remembering how to work together despite their turbulent relationships.

The fact it did get made (with doubts from the band and a lack of enthusiasm) gives Rumours pristine beauty and haunting etherealness – plenty of hopefulness and intricate beauty. Affairs and cocaine were as prevalent and in-demand as was musical impetus and dedication to the music. We all know about the splits, rifts and Mick – quite often the fifth wheel who had to ensure the coldness and immense friction; although his marriage was on the rocks and he had an affair with Nicks around this time. Even before the album started recording, there were problems and press intrusion.

In spite of this, with speculations the original band members would return to the fold, the band came into the studio with plenty of stigma in their blood. Keith Olsen was fired as producer ,who put percussion and rhythm low in the mix – and the McVies formed Seedy Management: a company that put the band’s interest first and ensured recording sessions would begin on a good footing (sound-wise at least). Soon enough Buckingham stepped in and took control of the recording sessions. He wanted to make a ‘Pop’ album which was at odds with other members of the band – who came from a Blues-Rock background and favoured a looser and less disciplined style of recording. Buckingham’s discipline, vision and ultra-precise methodology and studio set-up were unique and inspired. Buckingham and McVie crafted the guitar-and-piano combinations together whilst John McVie played his bass facing Mick Fleetwood’s drums. Buckingham’s configurations and dynamics meant the band members were focused: instruments arranged to create the best sound.

Recording at the Record Plant, there was not a lot of after-recording socialising. Cocaine binges and frosty relationships meant the individual members were isolated throughout much of Rumours and lead to sleepless nights. “Rumours”  music was astonishingly focused and inspiring in spite of all the problems. If you did not know about Fleetwood Mac’s backstory in 1977, you would assume Rumours was the product of a happy and together band in inspired form. Aside from “The Chain” all members coming together in an anthem for unity and holding on  the remaining tracks were written alone by songwriters Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks.

If Nicks’ Dreams seems like a message to keep focused and do not give in it has a breakup and heartbreak at its centre. The members of Fleetwood Mac were oblivious to the true nature of their (wracked and pain-stricken) songs until hindsight provided clarity. Try and make an album like Rumours today and it would simply not work. For a start, musicians are not as enigmatic and fascinating as the American-British alliance in this band . Despite Nicks’ hostility towards Buckingham – or his towards her more accurately – he still had a knack of making Nicks’ songs sumptuous and beautiful. Yes, there was enormous self-indulgence and excess during the recording that threatened to threaten productivity.

The open-ended budget meant late-night parties would last to the wee hours and sleep was an elusive construct. The band would finish drinking and snorting vast quantities of cocaine, being in a desperate, zombie-like state, and get straight down to recording. It became apparent the most productive results occurred under these conditions.

Talk all you like about legend, folklore and technical specifications: it is the music, pure and simple, the final product is what matters and damned to the petty squabbles around it. The music is near-perfect. You talk about albums that are beyond criticism and should be preserved forever: Rumours is on top of a very elite list.

The interplay between the three vocalists  Christine McVie, Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham – is stunning and the affection between them heartwarming. They were, and still are, brothers and sisters. Even at their most tense and uncertain, the respect they had for one another as musicians outranked any personal beefs. Buckingham’s crisp, clean and assured production makes songs like “Don’t Stop” infectious, luminous and endlessly catchy.

“Go Your Own Way” is, in my view, the best song on the album and benefits from a truly astonishing vocal turn. Dreams is that divine Nicks hymn; whilst McVie talked about Mick Fleetwood in “Oh Daddy” . ‘Big Daddy’ was the band’s nickname for the drummer – with Nicks providing the final line: “And I can’t walk away from you, baby/If I tried”. Perhaps a shot (from McVie) at the direction Fleetwood was taking the band, or a subtle illusion to their impending affair (Nicks’ line). “Gold Dust Woman” documents the struggles (Nicks) faced in L.A. Christine McVie came into her own as a writer and penned the hair-raising, transcendent “Songbird” – a little prayer from the keyboardist and a song about nobody and everyone. If the band’s two female writers were at their peak Lindsey Buckingham was stealing the limelight. Not only was his leadership and production a major factor in the Rumours’ success but his bittersweet songs were scene-stealing. Go Your Own Way and Never Going Back Again are obvious in their derivation but, mythology and cynicism aside, are incredible works of music. Second Hand News is the acoustic opener that starts things off wonderful; Buckingham’s hand in The Chain cannot be understated. The songwriting credits Buckingham had three solo credits from eleven; Nicks; McVie four makes the album a democracy and collaborative thing.

Image result for fleetwood mac recording rumours

In the footage you’re about to hear, there’s an actual Fleetwood Mac rehearsal taking place just before the band embarked on their critically acclaimed Rumours tour in early 1977.

Caught on tape, we can hear Christine McVie, John McVie and Stevie Nicks delivering entertaining commentary on their roadies, but as soon as Lindsey Buckingham brings “Go Your Own Way” to life, it’s all work from there as the band joins in, treating this sacred rehearsal time as seriously as they would an actual live show.

This is a live version of Lindsey’s legendary song  “Go Your Own Way”(One of my favorite songs of all-time)!! This is from Fleetwood Mac’s GREAT (February 1977) Rumours Tour Rehearsals. Whay a great musician Lindsey is, but this song is his masterpiece. This song is what started it all for me over those years ago.

Check out his breathtaking guitar solo towards the end.

Lindsey wrote Go Your Own Way (about Stevie) while on the road Fleeywood Mac’s 1975 concert tour. Although the second verse ~ Tell me why everything turned around, Packing up, shacking up is all you wanna do ~ wasn’t added to it until later ~1976. Stevie had asked him to remove the ~ Packing up, shacking up part, but he refused to do so. (I’m glad he kept it in.)

The Rumours world tour saw Fleetwood Mac on the road from February 24th, 1977 through to December 10th of that year, hitting North America, Europe, Japan and Oceania.

What makes this clip so great is hearing the teamwork that goes into making a song like “Go Your Own Way” happen – you never realize how intricate the guitar work actually is, and this rehearsal audio is sure to make you appreciate Fleetwood Mac’s attention to detail and out of this world live performances even more!.

Rare Rehearsal Tape Reveals How Fleetwood Mac Brought “Go Your Own Way” To Life | Society Of Rock Videos

There are few albums as enduring and as mysterious as Rumours. It is a fascinating album in terms of its production and behind-the-scenes revelations but even more so from a musical perspective. The rumours and explosions might have salivated the mouths of the press but the band were keen to bridge the divided and come together to create a truly wonderful album. That is exactly what they did in 1976. When the album was released a year later, contemporary critics were raving. They noted how the music was directly propelled by inner-turmoils and romantic entanglements. As I said, most bands would be unable to separate life from art whereas Fleetwood Mac were all too aware of the reality of their situations but used it to create some of the finest music of the 1970s. It is radio-friendly and shiny; it has gloss and immaculate production but plenty of emotions and contradictions. The vocals, especially from Stevie Nicks, range from wailing and harrowed to sensual and alluring, whereas the compositions and song structures are immaculate. There is not a song immune from high praise and the album is an extraordinary testament to a group of musicians who found love and common ground in the middle of divorced relations and drug-filled chaos. I don’t understand why as yet why has nobody made a film/drama about Fleetwood Mac’s astonishing story?! Magazines, websites and music fans constantly place Rumours near the (or at) the top of their greatest albums polls. Musicians around the world have been inspired by the music and continue to source it forty years down the line. There are few albums as long-lasting as Fleetwood Mac’s masterpiece. It is a wonderful record .

thanks musicmusingsandsuch for the words

Fleetwood Mac will release an expansive, 30th anniversary edition of their 14th studio album, 1987’s Tango in the Night, on March 10th via Warner Bros. Records. The reissue is packaged in three formats: a one-CD set featuring remastered audio, an expanded two-CD version with rare and unreleased recordings and a deluxe version featuring three CDs, a 180-gram LP and a DVD with music videos and a high-resolution version of the album.

Christine McVie Singer-songwriter looks back on heady days at Château d’Hérouville, discusses band’s future plans
With Tango in the Night, Fleetwood Mac fully immersed themselves in the decade’s glossy production style. Showcasing the diverse styles of primary songwriters Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie, the 12-track LP spawned a quartet of hit singles: “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Everywhere” and “Little Lies.” Their second highest-selling album behind 1977 masterwork Rumours, it remains the group’s final studio project with the classic quintet line-up of Buckingham, Nicks, McVie, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood.
The deluxe and expanded reissues features a disc of 13 previously unheard recordings, including an alternate version of shimmering Christine McVie ballad “Mystified,” a demo of Buckingham’s epic, percussion-heavy title-track and rare B-sides “Down Endless Street” and “Ricky.” The deluxe edition offers a third disc with 14 12-inch mixes – including dub versions of “Seven Wonders and “Everywhere” – and a DVD with videos of “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Little Lies,” “Family Man” and “Everywhere.”
Buckingham and Christine McVie recently announced an album of duets tentatively titled Buckingham McVie. The set, which features contributions from John McVie and Fleetwood, is loosely slated for a May release.

Fleetwood Mac have spent the past few years reissuing their peerless back catalogue in the obligatory remastered, expanded, deluxe editions. Last year brought us the 1982 album “Mirage” which somehow managed to make an album already slathered in cocaine sound even more cokey, all sheen and shine.

Next up is Tango in the Night, coming out on Warner on 10th March, They’ve got this early, unreleased version of the Stevie Nicks track Seven Wonders for you. It’s longer but also a little harsher than the album version, drawing out the fatalism of the chorus and de-emphasising the keyboard hook.

Tango in the Night came out five years after Mirage, and had originally been planned as a Lindsay Buckingham solo record – Nicks spent only two weeks in the studio with the band because she was concentrating on her solo career. Be thankful that it became a full-band record, because the album became defined not by his songs but by the contributions of the other writers; without the two singles from Christine McVie“Everywhere” and “Little Lies” – it would be a very different record. While many Mac fans might have their favourite writer in the group, it takes all three of Buckingham, Nicks and McVie to balance the group.

That balance is what makes Tango in the Night so great. For all that the music is of a piece – sophisticated, slick, without ever being over-complicated – it manages to shift through moods effortlessly. Buckingham is on edge throughout and has explained that Big Love, his single from the album, gets misinterpreted: when he sings that he is “looking out for love”, he doesn’t mean he is looking for love, he is putting himself on guard for it. In the title track, he’s restless, discomfited (“Try to sleep, sleep won’t come”); Caroline upbraids a woman who is crazy and lazy; Family Man seems to be a hymn to domestic stability, but even then he can’t help observing that “the road gets tough”.

McVie’s songs appear much more straightforward. “Everywhere” is a simple, gorgeous statement of love; “Little Lies” its counterpart, the realisation that the feelings of Everywhere depend on self-deception. Nicks’s are neither straightforward, nor angry: Welcome to the Room … Sara was written after treatment at the Betty Ford clinic, and uncertainty echoes throughout her contributions (“If I see you again / Will it be the same?” she asks on When I See You Again. “If I see you again / Will it be over?”), and “Seven Wonders” exemplifies that, with Nicks confronting the notion that even living to see the seven wonders will never match what she has lost.

Fleetwood Mac – Tango in the Night

Reissue Track List (Deluxe Edition)
Disc One: Original Album – 2017 Remaster
1. “Big Love”
2. “Seven Wonders”
3. “Everywhere”
4. “Caroline”
5. “Tango In The Night”
6. “Mystified”
7. “Little Lies”
8. “Family Man”
9. “Welcome To The Room… Sara”
10. “Isn’t It Midnight”
11. “When I See You Again”
12. “You And I, Part II”
Disc Two: B-Sides, Outtakes, Sessions
1. “Down Endless Street”
2. “Special Kind Of Love” (Demo)*
3. “Seven Wonders” (Early Version)*
4. “Tango In The Night” (Demo)*
5. “Mystified” (Alternate Version)*
6. “Book Of Miracles” (Instrumental)
7. “Where We Belong” (Demo)*
8. “Ricky”
9. “Juliet” (Run-Through)*
10. “Isn’t It Midnight” (Alternate Mix)*
11. “Ooh My Love” (Demo)*
12. “Mystified” (Instrumental Demo)*
13. “You And I, Part I & II” (Full Version)*
*Previously Unissued
Disc Three: The 12″ Mixes
1. “Big Love” (Extended Remix)
2. “Big Love” (House On The Hill Dub)
3. “Big Love” (Piano Dub)
4. “Big Love” (Remix/Edit)
5. “Seven Wonders” (Extended Version)
6. “Seven Wonders” (Dub)
7. “Little Lies” (Extended Version)
8. “Little Lies” (Dub)
9. “Family Man” (Extended Vocal Remix)
10. “Family Man” (I’m A Jazz Man Dub)
11. “Family Man” (Extended Guitar Version)
12. “Family Party” (Bonus Beats)
13. “Everywhere” (12″ Version)
14. “Everywhere” (Dub)
Disc Four: The Videos (DVD)
1. “Big Love”
2. “Seven Wonders”
3. “Little Lies”
4. “Family Man”
5. “Everywhere”
(Plus a High-Resolution Stereo Mix of the Original Album)

July 22nd 1966 saw the release of what has become the greatest British blues albums of them all, John Mayall Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton. It was the first studio album and the second overall credited to John Mayall, who teamed up for the first time in a studio release with the ex- Yardbirds Eric Clapton.

It is also known as The Beano Album because of its cover photograph showing Clapton reading The Beano a British children’s comic. Clapton stated in his autobiography that he was reading The Beano on the cover because he felt like being “uncooperative” during the photo shoot

The album set the benchmark for all blues albums that followed, cemented by Clapton’s explosive guitar tone thanks to the majestic bonding between a Gibson guitar and a Marshall amplifier. Not only is it the greatest British blues album but it’s also one of the great albums of all time, period. Recorded April 1966 at Decca Studios West Hampstead, London.

The guitar that Eric Clapton used during these sessions was a sunburst 1960 Gibson Les Paul Standard with two PAF humbucking Pickups . This guitar (which was stolen in 1966; its whereabouts remain unknown) is also called the “Blues Breaker” or “Beano” Les Paul and a replica of which was reissued by Gibson in 2012. 

The band on this album includes Mayall on piano, Hammond organ, harmonica and most vocals; bassist John McVie drummer Hughie Flint and Clapton. Augmenting the band on this album was a horn section added during post-production.

The album opens with the Otis Rush number “All Your Love”, a cracking way to begin. The song manages to capture everything great about the Bluesbreakers from John Mayall’s unique vocals, Clapton’s explosive guitar, McVie’s pounding bass and Flint’s driving rhythm that is the back bone of the entire song. It’s followed by “Hideaway” which has arguably become the standard version of the song, the original of course being by the late great Freddie King who Clapton was hugely influenced by at the time. Even though it’s a song largely dominated by Clapton’s guitar, the entire band shine brightly and showcase their abilities as Britain’s premier and best British blues band. The first Mayall penned track comes next in “Little Girl”. Apart from Mayall’s vocals, Clapton again takes centre stage with a blistering guitar solo over the ruthless rhythm section of John McVie and Hugh Flint, both of which really take this song to another level. “Another Man” is pure Mayall drenched with some of the best harmonica playing you’ll ever hear.

Things then slow down a tad with “Double Crossing Time”a fantastic number written by Mayall and Clapton. It’s a wonderful slow blues which clocks in at just over three minutes in length which is the only downside as you feel it deserves to go on for at least another few minutes. The opening riff of “What’d I Say”, originally by Ray Charles, is next and this particular version remains one of the most exciting ever recorded. Mayall gives one of his best vocal performances and it’s the first time on the album so far where you’re able to bask in the magnificence of Hugh Flint’s drumming, as he plays a superb solo section halfway through the song. The rest of the band then return with a Day Tripper-esque riff to bring the song to a close. Next up is “Key To Love” which is another Mayall original. Flint is an abs0lute force of nature with some of the best drumming you’ll ever hear, and Clapton returns for another ear drum attacking guitar solo.

The great “Parchman Farm” comes next which was originally recorded by Bukka White in 1940 and then covered by a host of musicians including Mose Allison, Johnny Winter, Bobbie Gentry and Hot Tuna to name just a few. Mayall is a man possessed on harmonica here, arguably giving his finest musical performance of the entire album. The slow blues number “Have You Heard” then takes things in a slower direction, at least at first. When it comes to electric guitar solos this song certainly contains one of the finest ever recorded with Clapton showing exactly why the nickname “God” was so fitting. The things he managed to do with a guitar during this song are second to none in my opinion, firmly placing him as the greatest British blues guitarist of all time.

“Ramblin’ On My Mind” remains to this day as one of Robert Johnson’s most well known songs, helped by the legendary status of this version featuring Clapton on lead vocals. And it’s the fact that Clapton took lead vocal duties on this song that made it so legendary, after all this is the first time he ever sang lead on a song. Even though he used to sing backing vocals with The Yardbirds it’s a strong vocal performance with guitar accompaniment including a tasty solo, backed up by Mayall on piano. It’s probably the most pure blues song of the whole album and a song that opened up Clapton both vocally and musically, as he would go on to call Robert Johnson one of his main influences and as a eventually record Me & Mr. Johnson, a tribute album to his idol, in 2004. “Steppin’ Out” is the second guitar lead instrumental after Hideaway and a song Clapton would continue playing with Cream up until their final active year in 1968. It’s a superb number with Clapton yet again showcasing his guitar abilities fantastically. The final song is “It Ain’t Right” which sees the album end on a wonderful note. Originally recorded by Little Walter, Mayall lays down some fine harmonica while the rest of the band hit hard like a freight train. A perfect way to end the album.

Original album

Side one

  1. All Your Love” (Otis Rush) – 3:38
  2. Hideaway” (Freddie King/Sonny Thompson) – 3:17
  3. “Little Girl” (Mayall) – 2:36
  4. “Another Man” (Mayall) – 1:47
  5. “Double Crossing Time” (Clapton/Mayall) – 3:04
  6. What’d I Say” (Ray Charles) – 4:28

Side two

  1. “Key to Love” (Mayall) – 2:08
  2. Parchman Farm” (Mose Allison) – 2:22
  3. “Have You Heard” (Mayall) – 5:56
  4. Ramblin’ on My Mind” (Robert Johnson) – 3:08
  5. Steppin’ Out” (L. C. Frazier) – 2:30
  6. It Ain’t Right” (Little Walter) – 2:45

Overall it’s a faultless album, A considerd Classic album. Not only do you get to witness the evolution of Eric Clapton but you get to listen to British blues at it’s very finest. The band as a whole were fantastic. John Mayall, Eric Clapton, John McVie, Hugh Flint.

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