Posts Tagged ‘Sarah Mary Chadwick’

Sarah Mary Chadwick Me & Ennui Are Friends Baby album review

New Zealand-born, Melbourne-based singer/songwriter Sarah Mary Chadwick’s previous effort, 2020’s “Please Daddy”, if you were feeling fragile, you could almost insulate yourself from her painfully honest song writing style, training your focus only on, say, the soaring horns on “When Will Death Come,” the blues-rock boogie of “Let’s Fight,” or the wistfully jazzy flute of “The Heart and Its Double.” But there’s no hiding from the broken heart of Me and Ennui Are Friends, BabyChadwick fully embraces emotional catharsis, stripping her songs back to solo piano and vocals only, and you have no choice but to follow suit. Just as she worked wonders on a 147-year-old pipe organ for her 2019 record “The Queen Who Stole the Sky”, Chadwick crafts an album of untold power not in spite of her focus on one instrument, but because of it. With “Please Daddy’s” diffuse textures out of the equation, the songwriter can only take a fearless inventory of her interior turmoil, turning a truly harrowing series of events—after the deaths of her father and a close friend, and the dissolution of a long-term relationship, Chadwick attempted to take her own life in 2019, just weeks before the Ennui sessions began—into an album that will knock your heart on its ass.

Chadwick’s unusual vocal delivery and unsparing, darkly funny song writing combine to make Ennui’s stark sensibility unforgettable, and Chadwick never flinches, wondering of her struggles at one point, “Is it all for this song? / If it is, is that wrong?” It will take all of your inner fortitude to answer her.

‘Every Loser Needs A Mother’ is the first single to be lifted from Sarah Mary Chadwick’s forthcoming 7th LP ‘Me And Ennui Are Friends, Baby’ out February 5th 2021 via Ba Da Bing Records & Rice Is Nice Records.

Prolific New Zealand-born, Melbourne based singer-songwriter Sarah Mary Chadwick is releasing “Me and Ennui Are Friends Baby” on February 5th via Ba Da Bing Records, and the latest single is “Full Mood,” which Sarah says “is about a Valentine’s Day date I went on. The owner of the bar we were at tried to get us both to fuck her, but she wouldn’t let me be in charge so we didn’t. I remember afterwards we were walking down the road and it was streetlights and still at 3am and everything felt great and shining and I remember thinking that I wish my dad could’ve done this, got drunk and kicked around the city at night when it’s all sparkly, holding onto someone who lights you up, not been stuck in silent dark rural New Zealand, watching other people’s lives on TV, drinking half glasses of box wine while his frowning wife ironed.”

“Me And Ennui Are Friends, Baby” is the latest full-length from New Zealand-born, Melbourne-based singer-songwriter, Sarah Mary Chadwick, whose brutally honest song writing has cast her contrary to the gentleness of most current music. Comprised entirely of minimal solo piano arrangements, the album is despondently clear-eyed and smirkingly self-deprecating, completing a trilogy of records that started with The Queen Who Stole The Sky recorded on Melbourne Town Hall’s grand organ, and her only outing to date featuring a full band, Please Daddy. Each record has followed Chadwick’s internal processing after a traumatic event, with Chadwick’s zeal for psychoanalysis front and centre. On Ennui, Chadwick presents an exacting intensity with her choice to pare back to piano and vocals. It’s in this stark setting that she focuses on the attempt she made on her life in 2019.

Directed by Tristan Scott-Behrends

Starring Daniel Villarreal & Sarah Mary Chadwick “Only Trumpets” Clip featuring Daniel Crook & Xavier Jimenez March ‘Full Mood’ is the third single from forthcoming album ‘Me And Ennui Are Friends, Baby’, out February 5th 2021 through Rice Is Nice Records & Ba Da Bing.

Find Sarah Mary Chadwick on Bandcamp – https://sarahmarychadwick.bandcamp.com

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Sarah Mary Chadwick today shares the visual accompaniment to her “upbeat, jangly” track ‘Let’s Fight’, one of our favourites from her incredible album ‘Please Daddy’ which was released in January of this year. 
Premiering via American Songwriter, the ‘Let’s Fight’ clip is was shot on location over a weekend in Tasmania, by fellow Rice Is Nice artist Brent Griffin aka SPOD. 
Chadwick says in a statement; “Tim [Deane-Freeman] the drummer insists I can’t play this song live but he’s tripping cause I invented it. The video was shot over a dream weekend with people I love. Life’s hard and it’s easy to fight but it’s the best thing in my life to me when you grab the joy that you can.” 
Rolling Stone Australia have today featured ‘Let’s Fight’ as a Song You Need To Know, writing that “the track and its accompanying video is some of the finest work from Sarah Mary Chadwick to date”. 
Sarah Mary Chadwick is one of Australia’s finest contemporary songwriters and lyricists, and we are incredibly excited to share new material with you very soon!

“’Let’s Fight’ is a jangly, rousing song about wanting to instigate conflict, and it features some of Please Daddy’s most wounded, confrontational lyrics.” American Songwriter 
“With lyrics that relate to the titular call for conflict, its outward sheen is as upbeat and jangly as ever, and easily serves as one of Chadwick’s finest tunes to date thanks to it’s almost intoxicating nature.” Rolling Stone Australia

New Zealand’s Sarah Mary Chadwick first made a name for herself as the singer/guitarist of the grungy band Batrider, but she’s been pursuing a solo career since 2012 and her fifth solo album, “The Queen Who Stole The Sky”, is a triumph like few others. Sarah, who normally plays guitar or keyboard, was commissioned by the City of Melbourne to perform an original piece on the Melbourne Town Hall’s 147-year-old pipe organ, the largest Grand Romantic organ in the Southern Hemisphere. Sarah Mary Chadwick has always been an artist who goes ‘all-in’ emotionally, and on this album, she’s playing the hand of her life.

The first time we heard some of the songs from Please Daddy was in St Paul’s Cathedral. Chadwick was on the organ, solo, hidden away behind the pulpit while her howls echoed off the arches. Listening from the pews these tracks sounded like a natural extension of her last album, The Queen Who Stole The Sky, which was written on Melbourne Town Hall’s 147-year-old grand organ. The sparseness and the weight of it all was overwhelming, in a way.

On record, Chadwick feels closer. Her backing band have returned – Geoff O’Connor and Tim Deane-Freeman on bass and drums, Hank Clifton-Williamson and Joel Robertson on flute and trumpet – and the snare-heavy percussion and lilting flute especially add a lightness that makes you remember that Chadwick’s explorations into mortality and grief aren’t meant to be cold. Life’s a bitch and you die every day. You can’t ignore it, but you can’t let it crush you either.

The organ sound is ENORMOUS, and the songs are just superb. Her voice arches with the aching power of Bjork and the frail grace of Neil Young. It’s an overwhelming listen, with the emotional heft of of a Gorecki symphony. It’s an albums that renders pain, beauty, grief and joy into a singular, rolling wave.
Let it wash over you and take you where it will.

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That piece became The Queen Who Stole The Sky, which was recorded live and then turned into Sarah’s new album. It’s a concept that would be interesting even if the album wasn’t that fun to listen to, but it is fun to listen to. It manages to have both the accessibility of her earlier work and the pure uniqueness you would expect from a project like this.

On this album, I keep coming back to thinking she sounds like Amanda Palmer meets Bjork, and it’s rare to even hear someone attempt sounding like that, let alone pull it off as masterfully as Sarah Mary Chadwick does. I’d like to think that comparison is at least enough to make you curious enough to listen (if you haven’t already), but this is not really the kind of album you can compare to other artists anyway. Like Amanda and Bjork, Sarah Mary Chadwick is a true original on The Queen Who Stole The Sky. Not only did she have the technical skills to pull off this task, she was able to come out with a personal, emotional album in the process. The pipe organ is a grand, majestic instrument, but The Queen Who Stole The Sky still sounds intimate.

2019 has unequivocally been something special for Daddies, wheather for better or mostly worse. Arguably the least Freudian of the bunch came from Melbourne’s Sarah Mary Chadwick (whose full-on “Daddy” album arrives early next year), which is preceded by the release of a title track written at first as a letter to both mama and daddy about the songwriter’s struggle with depression and the prospect of suicide, and later, yeah, as a bit of an Elektral complex deal. As always, Chadwick’s commanding voice takes center stage, with a rich orchestral backdrop supporting her booming vocals before they’re reduced to smoldered submission at the hands of yet another big and strong Dad.

First single from Sarah Mary Chadwick’s new album, ‘Please Daddy’. Out January 24 on Sinderlyn Records.

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The prolific Sarah Mary Chadwick returns with ‘The Queen Who Stole The Sky’, an album performed and recorded live on Melbourne Town Hall’s 147 year-old grand organ. Originally built in 1872, rebuilt in 1925 and refurbished in the 1990s.

In 2018, Sarah Mary Chadwick was commissioned by Melbourne City Council to create an entirely new body of work, to be written and recorded in just three months on an instrument grand in size, sound and antiquity. A daunting task to some, but Sarah Mary Chadwick’s trademark writing style is one that instigates itself furiously – she feels and then begins to write, without ruminating or long periods of drawn out self-reflection.

What results from this process are songs that are completely undiluted in their spirit, and an ability to create vast volumes of work over relatively short periods of time.

The Queen Who Stole The Sky’ is a body of work that is undeniably commanding, yet punctuated by quieter points of intimacy. The songs have a narrative-like quality, unfolding themselves before their audience. Sarah Mary Chadwick’s command of the grand organ is testament to her musicality – the sheer size of the instrument could so easily drown out the nuances of the songwriting – but not so for Sarah.

Sarah describes the songs as being mostly about rural isolation, death, and “the fact that I’m always waiting for life and it never arrives – it only ever leaves”.

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‘The Queen Who Stole The Sky’ was performed live at Melbourne Town Hall in the winter of 2018. The album is a masterful production by Sarah Mary Chadwick, and in Sarah’s own words, is dedicated to “anyone who ever wanted a little bit more than what life had to offer them”.

The Queen Who Stole The Sky’ will be released via Rice Is Nice Records + Heavy Machinery Records (AUS) April 12 + via Sinderlyn Records (US / EU) April 19th.

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Sugar Still Melts In The Rain is Sarah Mary Chadwicks 4th solo work. It was recorded and mixed by friend, musician and filmmaker Geoffrey O’Connor in Vanity Lair and Phaedra Studios in Melbourne. The album came together so quickly partly as a result of the duo’s commitment to efficiency and partly due to Sarah’s lack of attachment to the idea of “the perfect vocal take.” She knows she isn’t a virtuoso; tongue firmly in check, she is quick to reference those limitations mockingly. Yet, it’s within those boundaries that she thrives, disinterested in the perfect take in lieu of her best take – unique, somber and raw.

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Fourth album release from Sarah Mary Chadwick ‘Sugar Still Melts In The Rain’. This pre-order comes with a limited edition art print by Sarah Mary Chadwick.

Sugar Still Melts In The Rain is Sarah Mary Chadwick’s 4th solo work. It was recorded and mixed by friend, musician and filmmaker Geoffrey O’Connor in Vanity Lair and Phaedra Studios in Melbourne. The album came together so quickly partly as a result of the duo’s commitment to efficiency and partly due to Sarah’s lack of attachment to the idea of “the perfect vocal take.” She knows she isn’t a virtuoso; tongue firmly in check, she is quick to reference those limitations mockingly. Yet, it’s within those boundaries that she thrives, disinterested in the perfect take in lieu of her best take – unique, somber and raw.
Fourth album release from Sarah Mary Chadwick ‘Sugar Still Melts In The Rain’. This pre-order comes with a limited edition art print by Sarah Mary Chadwick.
released May 11th, 2018