Posts Tagged ‘Sinderlyn Records’

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Cults’ utterly mesmerizing new album, “Host”, was written more collaboratively than ever before and recorded primarily with live instruments for the first time. The collection marks the start of a bold new chapter for the band, one fuelled by an ever-deepening trust and a boundless appetite for growth and experimentation. The songs here are deceptively charming, with lush, airy arrangements that belie their dark, weighty lyrics, and the production is rich and multifaceted to match, blending retro and futuristic palettes into a spellbinding swirl of high-def indie rock and lo-fi bedroom pop. As its title suggests, Host is an exploration of the sinister dynamics at play in a parasitic relationship, but rather than dwell in the discomfort, the record charts a cathartic journey towards freedom and self-reliance, revelling in the power that comes from standing your ground and declaring independence in the face of exploitation and manipulation.

Cults have embarked on a radical reimagining, both of the band’s sound and its dynamic, and the result is the NYC indie duo’s utterly mesmerizing fourth album, Host. Written more collaboratively than ever before and recorded primarily with live instruments for the first time, the collection marks the start of a bold new chapter for the band. The songs here are deceptively charming, with lush, airy arrangements that belie their dark, weighty lyrics. The production is rich and multifaceted to match, blending retro and futuristic palettes into a spellbinding swirl of high-def indie rock and lo-fi bedroom pop. As its title suggests, “Host” is an exploration of the sinister dynamics at play in a parasitic relationship, but rather than dwell in the discomfort, the record charts a cathartic journey towards freedom and self-reliance,

New York duo Cults struggled to piece together their fourth album. After all of the music was recorded, something wasn’t working and the two artists weren’t happy with it. “It just didn’t feel like an album yet,” says singer Madeline Follin. It wasn’t until she—for the first time—brought her own songs to the table that the album started to become more like what they’d envisioned.

The title Host is partly inspired by this newfound collaborative effort, while also playing with ideas of power dynamics and independence. Multi-instrumentalist/singer Brian Oblivion said of Follin’s contributions: “The music just floored us, and suddenly everything started to click.” the duo broke down every track on Host, explaining themes of exploitation, addiction, relationships, and more.

1. “Trials”

Focuses on the power that addictions and harmful ideologies have to transform. The chorus walks a tight rope between a metaphor for gaslighting and a despairing worry about the person you still hold out hope for.

2. “8th Ave”

A song we wrote a long time ago at our old studio on Eight Avenue across from Port Authority. It’s an area with a well documented history of exploitation and corruption, but freedom and acceptance as well. Sonically it sounded like what we saw out the window and the lyrics flowed from there.

3. “Spit You Out”

This the first song we wrote for this record, trying on some of our more left field influences from the exotica sounds of Esquivel to Nine Inch Nails–style heaviness. It focuses on parasitic relationships and breaking away from toxic patterns of interaction. We never imagined it would relate to a worldwide pandemic.

4. “A Low”

One of the few romanitic-ish songs on the record. It starts with a kind of Greek chorus, setting the scene for the narrator to step in. From there the song tries to explain how transformative relationships can be even in the deepest depression, and even when the other party isn’t aware.

5. “Honest Love”

A quick tune that harks back to our first show at the Mercury Lounge. It draws on the metaphor that the fear of unpreparedness to perform a show shares with feeling unprepared to form a new connection. It also explores the vulnerability that comes with singing a personal song to strangers and how that relates to having intimacy with a new person.

6. “Working It Over”

This is our power ballad and end of side A of the record. The song centers on the importance of holding close to personal support systems and fighting against escapism in the face of hopelessness. It’s a reminder that the past is not greater than the present, and the future is unknowable. You’re probably not going to live in space, so we have to work together to deal with the problems of right now if we want to find satisfaction.

7. “A Purgatory”

Cutting the strings on a manipulative relationship and exiting the purgatory that could have continued without action.

8. “Masquerading”

Impostor Syndrome is the name of the game here. There’s a particular fear you experience every time you hear your words and songs anywhere in public—that fear of inadequacy haunts every new effort. Masquerading is a kind of acceptance that you’ll always have to play different roles as this will likely never go away.

9. “No Risk”

Antithetical to the title, the song is all about the benefits of taking risks, and how difficult that can be as a woman when being constantly told in both transparent and subliminal ways that you’re “second best” or not worthy of the same voice. The song transforms the title from a place of complacency to a challenge to empower yourself.

10. “Like I Do”

The song starts with a boast (“Can’t nobody sleep like I do”), and gradually transforms into a song about self destructively sweeping your problems off to side so you can keep moving forward.

11. “Shoulders to My Feet”

Touches on the difficulty of fending off intrusive thoughts of the past or fears of the future that get in the way of pursuing something positive.

12. “Monolithic”

A kind of happy ending. Its about giving in, and getting outside yourself even if you aren’t sure what the outcome will be in the end. After a record of pain and self doubt, it’s a jump into the abyss.

Trials” is from Cults’ upcoming album ‘Host’, out September 18th via Sinderlyn Records

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Cults duo of Madeline Follin and Brian Oblivion have announced a new album, “Host”, and shared a new song from it, album opener “Trials,” via a video for it. Host is due out September 18th via Sinderlyn Records and features “Spit You Out,” a new song Cults shared in June.

In a press release Cults collectively had this to say about the new song: “‘Trials’ focuses on the power that addictions and harmful ideologies have to transform. The chorus walks a tightrope between a metaphor for gaslighting and a despairing worry about the person you still hold out hope for.”

Jeff Strikers, who directed the “Trials” video, had this to say: “Cults asked me back in April if I had any ideas for a music video we could make while quarantined across the country. Via Zoom, we shot Madeline’s performance against a green tablecloth from a party store. I started experimenting with an old optical illusion called ‘Pepper’s Ghost,’ projecting Madeline’s image onto a sheet of glass to create a ghostly, hologram effect. They use this technique on the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland. It was pretty magical and the whole process was constant discovery and surprise. An ideal creative experience.”

Cults co-produced the Host with Shane Stoneback and it was mixed by John Congleton and mastered by Heba Kadry. Loren Shane Humphrey (The Last Shadow Puppets, Florence and the Machine, Guards) plays drums on the album. The album finds Follin exerting a bit more creative control than before and taking a larger role in the songwriting. “In the past, I’d never brought my own music to the table because I was just too shy,” Follin says in a press release.

“When Shane and I heard what Madeline had written, we couldn’t believe it,” says Oblivion. “The music just floored us.” The band’s last regular studio album was 2017’s Offering. Although in 2018 Cults also released another album where they covered The Motels’ classic 1979 debut album Motels in its entirety as part of Turntable Kitchen’s Sounds Delicious Series.

2019 has unequivocally been something special for Daddies, wheather for better or mostly worse. Arguably the least Freudian of the bunch came from Melbourne’s Sarah Mary Chadwick (whose full-on “Daddy” album arrives early next year), which is preceded by the release of a title track written at first as a letter to both mama and daddy about the songwriter’s struggle with depression and the prospect of suicide, and later, yeah, as a bit of an Elektral complex deal. As always, Chadwick’s commanding voice takes center stage, with a rich orchestral backdrop supporting her booming vocals before they’re reduced to smoldered submission at the hands of yet another big and strong Dad.

First single from Sarah Mary Chadwick’s new album, ‘Please Daddy’. Out January 24 on Sinderlyn Records.

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The prolific Sarah Mary Chadwick returns with ‘The Queen Who Stole The Sky’, an album performed and recorded live on Melbourne Town Hall’s 147 year-old grand organ. Originally built in 1872, rebuilt in 1925 and refurbished in the 1990s.

In 2018, Sarah Mary Chadwick was commissioned by Melbourne City Council to create an entirely new body of work, to be written and recorded in just three months on an instrument grand in size, sound and antiquity. A daunting task to some, but Sarah Mary Chadwick’s trademark writing style is one that instigates itself furiously – she feels and then begins to write, without ruminating or long periods of drawn out self-reflection.

What results from this process are songs that are completely undiluted in their spirit, and an ability to create vast volumes of work over relatively short periods of time.

The Queen Who Stole The Sky’ is a body of work that is undeniably commanding, yet punctuated by quieter points of intimacy. The songs have a narrative-like quality, unfolding themselves before their audience. Sarah Mary Chadwick’s command of the grand organ is testament to her musicality – the sheer size of the instrument could so easily drown out the nuances of the songwriting – but not so for Sarah.

Sarah describes the songs as being mostly about rural isolation, death, and “the fact that I’m always waiting for life and it never arrives – it only ever leaves”.

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‘The Queen Who Stole The Sky’ was performed live at Melbourne Town Hall in the winter of 2018. The album is a masterful production by Sarah Mary Chadwick, and in Sarah’s own words, is dedicated to “anyone who ever wanted a little bit more than what life had to offer them”.

The Queen Who Stole The Sky’ will be released via Rice Is Nice Records + Heavy Machinery Records (AUS) April 12 + via Sinderlyn Records (US / EU) April 19th.

Three long years of anticipation have preceded San Francisco’s psych-blasted, starry-eyed weirdos The Fresh & Onlys’ return with Wolf Lie Down. The opening title track is a searing return to form with chugging full speed rhythms, snotty Wipers wall-of-sound guitar gristle, and the unmistakable midnight croon of singer Tim Cohen. Their 6th LP and debut for Sinderlyn Records finds the band equally at home with anthemic garage rock burners like “Impossible Man” and “One Of A Kind,” and the brooding western twang of “Walking Blues” or “Black Widow”.  

Wolf Lie Down builds on the band’s literate guitar-pop arcana, seamlessly incorporating  their pastoral desert-noir sensibility into Cohen and Miles’ dueling damaged art-punk songcraft. While the record is driven and performed predominately by the duo of Miles and Cohen, former members Shayde Sartin and Kyle Gibson lay down their classic rhythmic chug on a few tunes. They also enlisted  original drummer James Kim, as well as touring companion James Barone (Beach House) on drums and some mixing duties.

The brilliant title track is among one of our favourites of the year, and now we also have the smouldering garage chug track of Impossible Man

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The triumphant return of the Fresh & Onlys! Wolf Lie Down is out August 25th, 2017 on Sinderlyn Records.

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While Cohen and guitarist/producer Wymond Miles are not the new kids on the scene (both are fathers of two now), Wolf Lie Down strips back the layered feel of the last few records to reveal themselves full of passion, imbued with an uplifting romanticism, and their trademark (if often overlooked) wry sense of humor. Recorded mostly at Miles’ home studio, the songs’ foundation came to life in the studios of Bay Area analog garage/ psych veterans Kelley Stoltz (Electric Duck) and Greg Ashley (Creamery).

This new chapter in the elusive world of The Fresh & Onlys is a triumphant return to form as underground jangle titans. Wolf Lie Down also wears the haunted pastoral vividness of their most recent work. Perhaps ironically, their latest LP in a vast canon of work may be the best introduction to this unapologetic multi-faceted rock ‘n’ roll band.

NOVELLA – ” Sentences “

Posted: January 15, 2017 in MUSIC
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How does one review an album as good as this without gushing too much As it is, everyone I know is going on about Novella they are a five piece UK group with four women and one guy, The album produced by Jonas Verijnen (Moon Duo, Ballet School) and Joshua Third (The Horrors).

I am reminded of some awesome Kiwi rock on the opening track, “Follow”. Think more of Bailter Space than The Clean, as the song has a heavier vibe and also reminds me of Stereolab. In fact, it also has a motorik feel to it. Muscular and lean, with a cool fuzzed out guitar joining the sweet mayhem. And then the vocals dive in, and I am totally blissed out. “Something Must Change” continues in that propulsive, distorted vein, capped by sweet, female vocals. Listeners may play spot the influence and could hear bands as disparate as Can and 13th Floor Elevators.

Not that it really matters, since Novella has carved their own path in the thickly defined forest of psychedelia that inhabits this planet. The mood completely changes on the lustrous and beautiful “Sentences”, reminding me of down tempo Lush. Stately guitars pair with crystalline harmonies, a perfect mix for this group. Psychedelic touches brush nearly everything on this release, but it’s never heavy-handed or too far out. “Two Ships” starts out with sitar tones and rather quickly morphs into beautiful, joyous noise.

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The band’s two new members add a lot of texture to these songs, and the collision of sound meshes perfectly. “Land Gone” has an instantly memorable chorus that most bands would kill for! “Phrases” is equally fine, with that metronome-like drumming I favor in fast step with burgeoning guitar lines. The songs are simple, but the band adds many layers to build an expansive sound. “Blue Swallow” lifts the drum part from “Tomorrow Never Knows” and puts it to effective use in a twisting and turning opus that lasts nearly six minutes. “Younger Than Yesterday” (borrowing a title from The Byrds this time) has watery melodic motes and once again reminds me of Miki and Emma from Lush. “Skies Open” once again employs sitar and marries it to sunny vocals and smoothly strummed guitar. It is the end to this musical journey, one I greatly enjoyed and highly recommend to fans of Krautrock and deftly written and played psychedelia.

Members
Hollie Warren (Guitar/Vocals)
Sophy Hollington (Guitar/Vocals)
Suki Sou (Bass)
Iain Laws (Drums)

Cymbals Eat Guitars is the most underrated band in America, and I will go door to door if I have to if it means the rest of this country can understand that. Their LP Pretty Years is perhaps the band’s most accessible, all huge guitars and Clarence Clemons saxophone (the N.J. band namechecks Springsteen on the record), but they haven’t lost what made them what they are. On “Fourth of July, Philadelphia (SANDY)”, lead singer Joseph D’Agostino writes the most compelling story told in music this year, about a brush with death that temporarily lifts him out of his depression. “All the adrenaline shocked my nervous system / Swore I’d be present and grateful for every second,” he sings. But then there is the heartbreaking conclusion: “Later the feeling faded / I couldn’t help it.”

“Have A Heart” is a love song that co-opts ’80s jangle and drive to make for one of the lightest, sweetest tracks that Cymbals Eat Guitars have put out to date. “I’m so out of sync, and you’re so out of sync with me,” Joseph D’Agostino sings for the misfit in all of us that just wants to find someone whose flaws are compatible with our own. He’s hung up on his past (“Things we did when we were young and evil”), but feels like he may be able to overcome those flaws with this new relationship: “Empathy never came so naturally ’til I met you.” “Have A Heart”‘s optimism is tempered with a sullen moodiness, sort of like almost taking flight but keeping your toes on the ground, but it still unabashedly entertains the notion that all those crazy romantic stories about love may actually be true: “Can’t believe the shit that we were promised might really exist.”

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Cymbals Eat Guitars fourth album, Pretty Years, will be released on September 16th, 2016 on Sinderlyn Records.

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The sunburned centerpiece of Cymbals Eat Guitars’ stunning upcoming album, Pretty Years, sees leader Joseph D’Agostino jolted out of his post-tour malaise by a surreal and terrifying Independence Day experience, over tumultuous fuzz-bass and incongruously swinging drums. “Swore I’d be present / And grateful for every second,” D’Agonstino declares at the end of it all, only to admit, “Later the feeling faded / I couldn’t help it.” Holiday weekends never do last as long as you want them to.

At their healthiest as a band, the New Jersey-via-Philly quartet have made one of the best classic-rock records of the 21st century. But will it give them the push that they need? the swinging, stunning centerpiece of Pretty Years, Cymbals’ magnificent fourth album, due out in September. The song, whose new video is premiered below, tells the story of Independence Day 2015 in the City of Brotherly Love, when Joe, Alex, and Sam piled in a friend’s car to go set off some fireworks, without realizing how wasted their driver was. “There were a bunch of cars already there and people were setting off sparklers and roman candles and stuff,” D’Agostino explains before the show, at a nearby Mexican restaurant with bassist Matthew Whipple. “And the person who was driving slammed it over these fireworks displays at very high speed. It was very scary.”

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Cymbals Eat Guitars fourth album, Pretty Years, will be released on September 16th, 2016 on Sinderlyn Records.