Posts Tagged ‘New Orleans’

Special Interest is a four piece Industrial punk band emerging from New Orleans, Louisiana. Combining elements of No-Wave, Glam, and Industrial Special Interest create a frenetic and urgent revisioning of punk and electronic music for a modern world gone mad. Propulsive analogue drum machines, a swirling layer of detuned samples, and a driving bass line create the foundation across which angular guitar work and dissonant synth lines glide. Front and center are Alli Logout’s commanding vocals and razor sharp lyrics moving from high camp satire to insightful political imperatives often within the course of one song.

Debut LP from NOLA’s Special Interest. Brooding, political no wave madness from members of Mystic Inane, Patsy, and Psychic Hotline. Great mix of all things punk and industrial, with plenty of catchiness to boot. Favorite track is definitely “Disco II”, a perfect dance tune for the inevitable techno-apocalypse ahead.

Originally released February 28th, 2018

Advertisements

Image may contain: 2 people, people standing, sky, shoes, child and outdoor

Following the release of a new single, an album announcement, and new upcoming US tour dates, the beloved New Orleans indie-rock duo Generationals are back today with their latest single “Gatekeeper”. A fusion of classic indie rock sound, charming vocals, and shimmering pop melodies, this latest single is another statement that the band is back and better than ever.

The Generationals new full-length album, Reader As Detective, is proving to be a testament to a band that has clearly been refining their skills over the years. “Gatekeeper” is a shimmering display of indie-pop sound that warms the soul but with clear attention to production that has us especially excited. A catchy percussion kick, a classic indie-rock guitar riff, and a charismatic bassline gets the listener hooked right from the start. From there, a slight distortion helps deliver a warming vintage vocal sound that hits that falsetto at just the right moment to make “Gatekeeper” prime to being this summer’s true indie-pop gem.

The indie-rock vocals never overpower that shimmering and pulsating pop melody and it’s that kind of mindfulness that only comes from seasoned musicians who truly been refining their sound. The Generationals this is their latest release since 2009 release ‘Con Law’ and  “Gatekeeper” dances beautifully between catchy synth work, animated guitar riff breaks and a summery indie-pop beat that has us thrilled for this new full-length album and upcoming tour.

Band Members
Ted Joyner,
Grant Widmer

Image result for DR JOHN PICS

The family of the Louisiana-born musician known as Dr. John says the celebrated singer and piano player who blended black and white musical influence with a hoodoo-infused stage persona and gravelly bayou drawl, has died. He was 77. A family statement released by his publicist says Dr. John, who was born Mac Rebennack, died early Thursday of a heart attack.

His spooky “Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya” slithered onto the pop-dominated market in 1968, startling listeners with its sinister implications of other-worldly magic..

In the summer of ‘97, the love of indie music was at its most highpoint with Spiritualized’s Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space. Dr John plays on the awesome “Cop Shoot Cop,”.

Dr John classic vinyl of Gris Gris. Mac Reddenback recorded it in L.A. with some NOLA studio musicians its a melange of psychedelic choogle with swamp gas vocals. It is one of the truly original listens in pop history. It’s singualar in the way Astral Weeks doesn’t really have a parallel, or the first Suicide album is true standalone.

the startling brew of voodoo funk and strange incantations, epitomised by the eerie eight-minute mantra “I Walk on Guilded Splinters”. Nobody had heard anything like it, including his label boss, Ahmet Ertegun. “Ahmet asked me: ‘What is this record you gave me … Why didn’t you give me a record that we could sell?’” Dr John recalled. He took the album on tour with a show resembling a bayou magic act, decking himself out in outlandish feathers, witch-doctor robes and headdresses.

Two follow-up albums to Gris-Gris – Babylon (1969) and Remedies (1970) – began to make him influential friends, including Eric Clapton and Mick Jagger, who both appeared on The Sun, Moon & Herbs (1971), After The Sun, Moon & Herbs he brought out the album Dr John’s Gumbo (1972), conceived as a tribute to New Orleans music, particularly the compositions of Professor Longhair . In 1973 he released the biggest selling album of his career, In the Right Place. Produced by Allen Toussaint and with the Meters as backing band, gave him a US Top 10 hit single with Right Place, Wrong Time. It also included Such a Night, which Dr John would perform at the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, filmed by Martin Scorsese as The Last Waltz.

Born Malcolm John Rebennack in 1941 in New Orleans, he began taking music lessons as a teenager and was exposed to jazz and early rock ‘n’ roll at a young age. In 1965, he moved to Los Angeles, where he developed the Dr. John persona, inspired by New Orleans voodoo. His style of music initially blended New Orleans R&B with psychedelic rock, and his debut album “Gris Gris” was released in 1968, which was a bold and strange introduction to his singular sound. In 1973, he released what would become his biggest hit, “Right Place, Wrong Time,” and over the course of his career he released two dozen albums. In 1997, he also collaborated with Spiritualized, performing piano on their sprawling track “Cop Shoot Cop.”

In 2011, Dr. John was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His last album was 2014′s Ske-Dat-De-Dat: The Spirit of Satch,

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen recently surprised the attendees at the Asbury Park Music and Film Festival by announcing that he would be releasing a concert film from the epic show that The Boss delivered to a 2006 Fest pummeled, bruised and beaten by Hurricane Katrina just eight months prior.

This was the first time Bruce had debuted his Seeger Sessions Bands, and there are many people that would argue that it was one of the most important sets ever delivered during the entire history of the festival. Springsteen devotes four full pages of “Born to Run” to his 2006 Jazz Fest experience. For many of those who stood on the Acura Stage field at the Fair Grounds that day, Springsteen’s show was a watershed event, an emotional meeting of music and moment.

He apparently felt the same way. He prefaces his account with, “There was one show in America that stood out as not only one of the finest but one of the most meaningful of my work life: New Orleans.”

He recounts arriving at the Fair Grounds at 8:30 a.m. for a sound check before the festival opened. U2 guitarist The Edge, an old friend, was there bright and early, as well, watching from the side of the Acura Stage as the Seeger Sessions Band rehearsed. He concludes, “I’ve played, many, many, many shows, but few like this one. …You cannot book, manufacture or contrive these dates. It’s a matter of moment, place, need, and a desire to serve in your own small way the events of the day. There, in New Orleans, there was a real job to do.”

Springsteen emphasizes how critical performing is to his existence; it is his primary drug. “I’ve never gotten anywhere near as far or as high as when I count the band in and feel what seems like all life itself and a small flash of eternity pulsing through me. It’s the way I’m built.”

Springsteen said he to release a film of his April 30th, 2006 performance with the Seeger Sessions Band at the New Orleans JazzFest. He considers that show, he said, to be among his Top 5, ever. He also said, about that rootsy Seeger Sessions project, “I wanna do that again sometime.”

Bruce Springsteen ranking that show as quite likely the best, and certainly most emotional, musical experience.

As Bruce Springsteen led his sprawling Seeger Sessions Band onto the Acura Stage on the Sunday, he confessed to a hint of trepidation. “It’s our first gig, ” he said. “Let’s hope it goes well.” Moments later, he encountered a “technical problem” with his pants. Grinning, the embarrassed Boss turned his back to the vast audience and made the necessary adjustments. “It’s not just a new band, ” he later explained, “but a new belt.”

That was his first, and final, glitch. For two hours, Springsteen and his glorious Seeger Sessions ensemble — six horns, a banjo, accordion, pedal steel, fiddles, piano — rendered vintage folk and protest songs stirringly alive and relevant in a tour de force performance. Like few others in popular music could, he crafted a show that spoke eloquently to the city’s struggles, both welcome distraction and poignant reminder.

The opening “O Mary Don’t You Weep” set the tone. Springsteen led, then the full ensemble swung in behind him. A muted trumpet, a trombone and a saloon piano all took solos. Springsteen, as usual, heaved himself into the material at hand. The gravel in his voice stamped a ragged glory on “John Henry” over banjos and accordion. “Old Dan Tucker” and “Open All Night” were each a hoot. Big horn swells lit up a gritty “Jesse James.”

The best folk songs transcend time. In the old Irish anti-war ballad “Mrs. McGrath, “ a cannonball claims her son’s “two fine legs”; it could just as easily have been an improvised explosive device.

Certain lyrics resonated more directly for locals: “There’ll be better times by and by.” “God gave Noah a rainbow sign, no more water, but fire next time.” “The bank holds my mortgage and they want to take my house away.” “The only thing we did right was the day we started to fight.” And it was easy to imagine “Louisiana” swapped into the lyrics to “My Oklahoma Home, ” which was “blown away” in a natural disaster.

In his most overtly political statement, Springsteen recalled his visit the previous afternoon to the 9th Ward. “I saw some sights I never thought I’d see in an American city, ” he said. “The criminal ineptitude makes you furious.” In response, he adapted Blind Alfred Reed’s “How Can a Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live” with new lyrics dedicated to “President Bystander”: “My old school pals had some high times there/What happened to you folks is too bad, ” he sang, mocking President Bush’s comments in the early days after Hurricane Katrina.

The set’s watershed moment, literally, was “My City of Ruins.” Originally written for his adopted hometown of Asbury Park, N.J., he dedicated it to New Orleans. To a hushed audience, Springsteen closed his eyes and began: “There’s a blood red circle on the cold dark ground, and the rain is falling down/The church door’s blown open, I can hear the organ’s sound, but the congregation’s gone . . . the boarded-up windows, the hustlers and the thieves, while my brother’s down on his knees . . . now tell me how do I began again? My city of ruins. . .” And then the refrain: “Come on, rise up! Rise up!” Thousands lifted their hands to the sky.

Just as quickly, Springsteen kicked back into good-time gear with “Buffalo Gals” and a zydeco rubboard and accordion reimagining of “You Can Look (But You Better Not Touch), “ from his 1980 album, “The River.” A tuba, improbably enough, was the final instrument onstage before the encore at a Springsteen show.

Then he presented one last gift. A hundred bands in New Orleans, Springsteen said, could play this last song better than he. But he had come across two lesser-known verses that he thought might be appropriate. With that, he unspooled “When the Saints Go Marching In, “ not as a boisterous, high-kicking second-line, but as an acoustic prayer, delivered in a desperate hour. Face clenched, he sought the promised land: “Now some say this world of trouble is the only world we’ll ever see/But I’m waiting for that moment when the new world is revealed.”

No other artist could have spoken to, and for, the city of New Orleans at this most important of Jazzfests more purposefully, more passionately and more effectively than Bruce Springsteen and the Seeger Sessions Band.

No photo description available.

For the past two years Saddle Creek Records have been doing their part to support the DIY community beyond their Omaha scene with the Document Series, an ongoing collection that shines a light on the radiant pockets of indie rock throughout the country. They’ve previously featured Posse, Palehound, Hand Habits, Hovvdy, etc. and now New Orleans’ Treadles are the next in line. One of our favorite new bands from the Crescent City, the quartet released “Bees Are Thieves Too” back in 2017, their first release as a full band. The years since have found KC Stafford (guitar, vocals) busy as a member of experimental doom metal favorites, Thou, but some point they found enough time to record a few new Treadles songs. Their return is triumphant on “Cold b/w Iron”, the new 7” single handpicked by Saddle Creek, is due out May 24th.

“Cold,” the single’s A-Side is a procession of textures both gentle and raw, from the warm picked intro into the deep plodding bass line. Stafford and Emily Hafner offer a gorgeous harmony, their voices a perfect pairing to sink into hazy emotional atmosphere, punctuating the pull of gravity as they sing “morning comes with the sun but I can’t pick me up from off this dirty ground.” Ian Paine-Jesam casually works an entrancing floor tom and snare rhythm as the band break toward ethereal clarity in the song’s bridge, shifting toward a knotted progression, one that weaves itself tighter as it evolves. The intensity eventually boils over with the structure erupting yet remaining impeccably tight. Treadles work themselves into the oncoming chaos with grace, becoming ever so unglued as they “try not to think about it.”

TreadlesCold from the Saddle Creek Records Document 7″ vinyl Cold b/w Iron Out May 24th 2019!

Image may contain: 1 person, close-up

We are big fans of Country singers with the surname Rose, and this week we were delighted to find it wasn’t just Caitlin we had to be excited about. Hailing from New Orleans, Esther Rose, no relation as far as we know, has actually been quietly gaining fans since the release of her 2017 record, “This Time Last Night”, which Jack White liked so much he invited Esther to come and sing with him on his Boarding House Reach album. This week, Esther has not only shared a brand new single, “Handyman”, but also confirmed her upcoming release of the second album, “You Made It This Far”, out in August on Father/Daughter Records.

Listening to Handyman, what instantly grabbed us was the integrity of it all; there’s a purity to both the unpolished playing and the effortless, dripping emotion of the vocal delivery. We’re put in mind of the first time we heard Hurray For The Riff Raff; the way from barely a single phrase we wanted to know everything about the person singing it, sometimes a song just grabs you, just demands your uninterrupted attention, Handyman does just that. There’s a winning simplicity to the instrumentation; the gentle drive of a snare drum, the meandering weave of the fiddle, the minimal pulse of upright bass, all serve to give a platform to Esther’s tale of an affection still burning, despite the quiet questioning, “I hope you change your mind, won’t you try?” Timeless, beautiful, and quite, quite brilliant, we might just have found our new favourite songwriter.

You Made It This Far is out August 23rd via Father/Daughter Records. 

“I’m always changing,” Esther Rose sings at the top of her sophomore album, “You Made It This Far”. The line is at once a promise and a plea, a concise distillation of her commitment to evolution as well as her dogged determination to meet every challenge in her path with unconditional acceptance. Laid-back yet deliberate, her delivery here marries old-school country and rural folk with a plainspoken philosophy that’s thoroughly modern, and the end result is a record that’s as joyful as it is restless, one that weaves fiddle and lap steel around profound revelations .

“There’s this theme of radical acceptance running through the whole album,” explains Rose, who recorded the album live to tape at Mashed Potato Records in New Orleans in just four days. “I didn’t realize it until after I’d finished writing the songs, but they all came from this place of trying to understand and truly accept myself and others in our most vulnerable moments of confusion or despair.”

A New Orleanian for the last decade, Rose first gained national prominence with the release of 2017’s This Time Last Night, an intoxicating debut, her “honest, gorgeous country songs” and rave that “her voice has a pitched-up June Carter quality, her melodies are simple like Jimmie Rodgers’s, and her tone is reminiscent of bluesy, lovelorn greats like Rex Griffin and Patsy Cline.” The record earned Rose many festival performances from Savannah Stopover to AmericanaFest alongside dates with The Punch Brothers, Pokey Lafarge, and The Deslondes, and it even caught the ear of fellow Detroit native Jack White, who was so taken with the music that he invited Rose to duet with him on his Boarding House Reach album and to share the stage for a live performance at Jazz Fest.

http://

While writing the songs that would become You Made It This Far, Rose found herself working through a period of tumultuous change, grappling with a breakup, a move, and a family illness all at once. Splitting her time between New Mexico and New Orleans, she pondered what it takes to love and to be loved, to be vulnerable enough to let someone in and brave enough to face the pain when they’re gone.

Following the release of 2014’s AlixGenerationals decided to forego the traditional approach of writing, recording and releasing music in one large batch in favor of putting out singles as soon as they were completed, which resulted in a slew of standalone tracks throughout 2017 and 2018.

Now, for the first time, these singles (along with an exclusive track) will receive a physical release via State Dogs: Singles 2017-18.

Pre-orders are live, including a limited edition vinyl pressing, along with CD and digital options. Order now and receive 8 tracks instantly! The entire collection drops on December 7th.

http://

Releases December 7th, 2018

Ryan Adams  was in New Orleans on Saturday to worship The Rolling Stones with the one-off “Exile on Bourbon St.” concert, a full-album tribute to the Stones’ 1972 landmark album “Exile on Main Street”.

Ryan Adams was joined at the Saenger Theatre by a group of New Orleans musicians including Cyril Neville on percussion, John Medeski of Medeski Martin & Wood on keys and Terence Higgins of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band on drums. Erstwhile Stones producer Don Was served as musical director and played bass. All 18 Exile On Main Street songs were on the set list, as was “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” (which, of course, was actually on 1971’s Sticky Fingers). La Sera’s Todd Wisenbaker, who worked with Adams on his 1989 covers album, contributed guitar and backing vocals.

The performance featured some long jams on the songs Keith Richards probably would hate, and other moments of artistic license, like the honky-tonky swing of “Sweet Virginia” subbed out for a more ponderous alt-rock feel.

Adams did treat fans to a couple of extra tunes in the encore, including ‘Wild Horses’ and ‘Can’t You Hear Me Knocking’ from 1971’s Sticky Fingers, and ‘The Worst’, from 1994’s Voodoo Lounge.

Exile On Main St. was released back in May of 1972 after being recording the previous year while The Rolling Stones were living in France as tax exiles. Touching on a wide variety of topics and themes while utilising a number of musical styles, the album has often been considered by many music critics as one of the group’s finest works, and one of the greatest albums of all time.

Earlier in the week, Adams tweeted a photo of his telecaster and some crib notes for the 18 songs that would make up the show, writing. “The hardest Rolling Stones songs to learn are weirdly the ones with the least chord changes.”

Some of the songs were performed faithfully, though others were given a new tempo or some extra jangle. “Sweet Virginia,” for one, was slowed way down and played more as a ballad than a country stomper. Watch the band perform that one, plus “Tumbling Dice” and a nine-minute version of “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking.”

The iconic singer-songwriter Ryan Adams headlined his Exile on Bourbon St. an incredible group of musicians performed one of the greatest albums in music history, Exile on Main St., in its entirety. “I’ve listened to all the multi-track tapes from the EXILE period and it’s not hyperbolic to say that this is probably the greatest rock ‘n roll ever recorded! I can’t wait to dig deep into these songs with The Mighty Ryan Adams and this incredible group of musicians,” says Don Was,

exile on bourbon st

Image may contain: 2 people, people standing, tree, sky, grass, outdoor and nature

Bent Denim builds beautiful, narrative- driven songs by swapping tracks over email between their respective home bases of Nashville, New York, and New Orleans.

“Idiot” is the new track from Bent Denim and while it makes for a flat and grey three-minute space, over time it becomes something quietly but strikingly pretty; the tempered sound of listlessness articulated rather beautifully indeed.

Taken from the duo’s new album ‘Town and Country’. which is released on May 11th, the new track is almost hypnotically tender, and it’s no surprise to hear that it was informed by the idea of childhood and memories and the space such things leave behind. Slurred and suffocating, the whole thing plays out like some filmic half-dream sequence, where the weight of an afternoon sends us spiralling back to rarely visited recollections of youth, the distance between then-and-now leading to the kind of yearning nostalgia that can quickly put paid to the rest of the day.

http://

Tenderly handled, and all the more alluring for the blurred gaps it’s happy to reveal, “Idiot” is a captivating next-step, and one that adds even greater intrigue to the forthcoming new record.

http://

Band Members
Ben Littlejohn,
Dennis Sager,
Chris Littlejohn,