Posts Tagged ‘Dr John’

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Arriving on the heels of the socially conscious “Babylon”, Dr.John’s 1970 album “Remedies” marked his 3rd studio release under his eccentric, voodoo-inspired “Night Tripper” persona, and his first not to be produced by Harold Bapttiste, instead turning to famed rock producer Tom Dowd. Featuring a psychedelic and progressive take on Dr. John’s signature style of swampy, hazy New Orleans boogie-woogie rock, undoubtedly inspired by his then recent stint in a psych ward.
Remedies is not rock and roll, it is something nearly otherworldly, and almost beyond comprehension. While it includes such standout Dr. John tracks as “Wash Mama Wash” and “Loop Garoo,” it also includes “Angola Anthem,” which is murky, mysterious and downright evil-sounding. Much of this very long cut is lost without headphones, for the music floats about in a smoky fog while Dr. John and his backup singers chant, moan, and cry out. Progressive radio loved this stuff, and it still sounds great during those late-night flirtations with the dark side of the psyche.

The sound on this album is a transition from the voodoo stew on the Dr’s first album Gris Gris and the funky sounds of albums like In The Right Place & Desitively Bonnaroo,

“Remedies” must be heard to be believed. One of the records that made Dr John a legend back in the day – a set that steps off from New Orleans roots into a world of weird funk, tripped-out sounds, and lots and lots of super-heavy grooves! The album’s got a nicely exploratory vibe – as the first side features shorter funky cuts, but the second half really stretches out, and features a side-long track that has the Doctor at his most freewheeling – mixing deep currents from soul and blues with all the great ear for studio techniques he’d developed over the years – fused into a sound that’s almost a fantasy of a soulful subculture in the swamps. Titles include “Loop Garoo”, “Wash Mama Wash”, “What Goes Around Comes Around”, “Mardi Gras Day”, and “Chippy Chippy” – plus the side-long “Angola Anthem”

Track listing:

A Side.1.Loop Garoo 2.What Goes Around Comes Around 3.Wash, Mama, Wash 4.Chippy, Chippy 5.Mardi Gras Day
B Side.1.Angola Anthem

Splatter Colored Vinyl Pressing Exclusive For RSD 2020. First issued in 1970. CD last issued in 2002.
Original Vinyl out of print since the 70s. 2500 copies worldwide

recordstore day

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The family of the Louisiana-born musician known as Dr. John says the celebrated singer and piano player who blended black and white musical influence with a hoodoo-infused stage persona and gravelly bayou drawl, has died. He was 77. A family statement released by his publicist says Dr. John, who was born Mac Rebennack, died early Thursday of a heart attack.

His spooky “Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya” slithered onto the pop-dominated market in 1968, startling listeners with its sinister implications of other-worldly magic..

In the summer of ‘97, the love of indie music was at its most highpoint with Spiritualized’s Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space. Dr John plays on the awesome “Cop Shoot Cop,”.

Dr John classic vinyl of Gris Gris. Mac Reddenback recorded it in L.A. with some NOLA studio musicians its a melange of psychedelic choogle with swamp gas vocals. It is one of the truly original listens in pop history. It’s singualar in the way Astral Weeks doesn’t really have a parallel, or the first Suicide album is true standalone.

the startling brew of voodoo funk and strange incantations, epitomised by the eerie eight-minute mantra “I Walk on Guilded Splinters”. Nobody had heard anything like it, including his label boss, Ahmet Ertegun. “Ahmet asked me: ‘What is this record you gave me … Why didn’t you give me a record that we could sell?’” Dr John recalled. He took the album on tour with a show resembling a bayou magic act, decking himself out in outlandish feathers, witch-doctor robes and headdresses.

Two follow-up albums to Gris-Gris – Babylon (1969) and Remedies (1970) – began to make him influential friends, including Eric Clapton and Mick Jagger, who both appeared on The Sun, Moon & Herbs (1971), After The Sun, Moon & Herbs he brought out the album Dr John’s Gumbo (1972), conceived as a tribute to New Orleans music, particularly the compositions of Professor Longhair . In 1973 he released the biggest selling album of his career, In the Right Place. Produced by Allen Toussaint and with the Meters as backing band, gave him a US Top 10 hit single with Right Place, Wrong Time. It also included Such a Night, which Dr John would perform at the Band’s 1976 farewell concert, filmed by Martin Scorsese as The Last Waltz.

Born Malcolm John Rebennack in 1941 in New Orleans, he began taking music lessons as a teenager and was exposed to jazz and early rock ‘n’ roll at a young age. In 1965, he moved to Los Angeles, where he developed the Dr. John persona, inspired by New Orleans voodoo. His style of music initially blended New Orleans R&B with psychedelic rock, and his debut album “Gris Gris” was released in 1968, which was a bold and strange introduction to his singular sound. In 1973, he released what would become his biggest hit, “Right Place, Wrong Time,” and over the course of his career he released two dozen albums. In 1997, he also collaborated with Spiritualized, performing piano on their sprawling track “Cop Shoot Cop.”

In 2011, Dr. John was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His last album was 2014′s Ske-Dat-De-Dat: The Spirit of Satch,