Posts Tagged ‘The Wave Pictures’

Garage rock super group The Surfing Magazines share “New Day” , Comprised of one half of Slow Club and two thirds of Wave Pictures, The Surfing Magazines are already garage rock royalty.

Drawing influences from ‘60s surf music and taking inspiration from greats like Dylan and Reed, the band are on a war path to destroy today’s bongo pop demigods and pretentious prog-indie-rock millionaires.

Speaking more on the track the band say: “New Day’ is a super quick tune. I’m not totally sure what its about. There’s some Russian dolls in there, a birthday clown, and apparently I want to throw all my clothes away”.

The Surfing Magazines are a new supergroup featuring Charles Watson from Slow Club, David Tattersall & Franic Rozycki from The Wave Pictures and Dominic Brider.  the band have also announced their debut festival appearance at End of the Road Festival this summer,

“New Day” out now via Moshi Moshi Records.

Lines and Shadows by The Surfing Magazines is taken from their debut self-titled album out on 1st September:

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Temples release their second album Volcano on Heavenly Recordings. It was self-produced and recorded at the band’s home studio in Kettering. It doesn’t take too long with Volcano to realise that, while all the things that made the band special the first time around remain intact, a noticeable evolution has taken place. It’s there from the outset: the beefed-up beats of Certainty reveal an expanded sonic firmament, one in which bright synth hooks and insistent choruses circle around each other over chord sequences that strike just the right balance between nice and queasy. One thing you do notice is that it’s harder to spot the influences this time around. It would be disingenuous to evade the psych-pop tag, for sure, but mystical language has been supplanted by something a more direct – and while those influences are still there, it’s no longer possible to pick them out. They’ve been broken down and blended together – fossilised into a single source of creative fuel, so that what you can hear this time around, sounds like nothing so much as Temples. This is the sound of a band squaring up to their potential.

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18 months and 10,000kms travelled since many needles first dropped on her debut LP Listen To Formation Look For The Signs, it’s safe to say with new album Preservation, Nadia Reid now knows herself extremely well. An ode to self-reflection and self-betterment, Preservation is the sound of Nadia showing her true colours, taking back a bit of power, and learning more about herself. Deeply intellectual but felt by all, it punches harder than before. Nadia’s beautifully warm vocals coolly wrap around feelings of turbulence, and exude a gently improved confidence. Returning to the production skills of Ben Edwards in his Sitting Room studios and long term guitarist Sam Taylor, this time around everything is rubbed in more grit and channels Nadia’s deftly profound take on life and whilst we already knew it, her own realisation that it is music which drives her. Nadia has seen the world she once knew become a whole lot larger. Simply singing her truth has taken her to becoming acquainted with her Scottish and Irish heritage during her first full European tour, downtime with long-time sister-from-another-mister Aldous Harding and even making the odd award shortlist along the way (NZ’s 2016 Taite Music Prize). Rather than growth in its most typical sense of any artist finding their way in the world, Preservation marks a natural passing of time – what you pick up along the way is a bonus.

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The always prolific The Wave Pictures release an exclusive 10″ on Madrid-based label Acuarela with five very fine covers and an original in tribute to the legendary Wilko Johnson, mythical founder of the rhythm and blues band Dr. Feelgood. The Wave Pictures are strange: they are an indie rock band without indie rock influences. Everything they have been listening to throughout the years is blues and American 50’s and 60’s rock‘n’roll. Nevertheless, they have never enjoyed those retro behaviors which slavishly copy the looks, sound, haircut and sources of the past which escape from the spirit of the music they love. They have their own style and they don’t want to be a blues band, but the blues is there, in the invisible nucleus of everything they do. Following on from 2015’s Billy Childish collaboration Great Big Flamingo Burning Moon, their recent acoustic record A Season in Hull and their latest LP Bamboo Diner In The Rain, The Wave Pictures pay tribute in Canvey Island Baby to one of their major influences: Wilko Johnson. The founding member of Dr. Feelgood credited as one of the greatest ascendancies of the English punk movement has also been part of the cast of HBO’s Game of Throne as Sir Ilyn Payne back in 2010. In 2013, Johnson was diagnosed with late stage of pancreatic cancer and played what was going to be his final show guesting with Madness on the television program Madness Live: Goodbye Television Centre broadcasted on BBC Four. It seemed as if Johnson’s career was over after he cancelled his two final shows in Canvey Island, but on April 2014, he reappeared at the Icon Awards ceremony to surprise the world with the news that after radical surgery he was now cancer-free. The Down By The Jetty album was an early influence on David Tattersall for the way Wilko Johnson combined the roles of lead and rhythm guitar. But for The Wave Pictures, Wilko’s music is also loads and loads of fun. Citing David “he’s a wonderfully idiosyncratic singer and an original songwriter, always finding a little trick in that old blues song form to make a new, poppy point”. Wilko Johnson doesn’t use effects pedals and neither do The Wave Pictures. They have made this EP out of fun. After all, it is homage to one of the most influential guitarists and to the career of this living legend. It is a 10” which has as part of its title the name of his birthplace (Canvey Island), 5 covers of Wilko’s songs and a new original Wave Pictures song.

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As humans, we are aware of our inner beast and should therefore be able to control it. We understand our hard-wired primal urges and why they exist in an evolutional sense. We understand the relationship between mind and body. Highly evolved and intelligent, we should be able to recognize these genetic hangovers and control them as a means to act positively and move forward as a compassion-ate species. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Recent global events have proven this. The human race is consuming itself. World Eater, the new album by Benjamin John Power’s Blanck Mass project, is a reaction to this. There is an underlying violence and anger throughout the record, even though some of these tracks are the closest Power has ever come to writing, in his words, “actual love songs.” “Maybe subconsciously this was some kind of countermeasure to restore some personal balance,” Power explains. On World Eater, Power further perfects the propulsive, engrossing electronic music he has created throughout his impressive decade-plus career, both under the Blanck Mass moniker and as one-half of Fuck Buttons, as he elaborates upon the sound of 2015’s brilliant double album Dumb Flesh. As massive as the sonic world of the new record often feels, its greatest achievement is in its maximization of a limited set of tools, a restriction intentionally set by Power himself. “As an exercise in better understanding myself musically, I found myself using an increasingly restricted palette during the World Eater creative process. Evoking these intense emotions using minimal components really put me outside of my comfort zone and was unlike the process I am used to. Feeling exposed shone a new light on this particular snapshot. I feel enriched for doing so.”

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Everything Is Forgotten, the new album from Methyl Ethel (Perth, Australia), is a vivid, compelling and mysterious creature, all sinewy, curvaceous pop nuggets and enigmatic currents. Written and recorded by frontman Jake Webb, the album was brought to life by acclaimed producer James Ford (Arctic Monkeys, Foals). The pair’s collaboration infusing the band’s shoegaze dream-pop palate with electronic and polyrhythmic flourishes, allowing Webb’s keening, gender-fluid vocals and searing poetry to take centre stage.

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London based trio The Wave Pictures – Jonny Helm (drums), Dave Tattersall (guitar & vocals) and Franic Rozycki (bass) – return with their brand new album ‘Bamboo Diner In The Rain’ on Moshi Moshi Records.

Following on from last year’s Billy Childish collaboration ‘Great Big Flamingo Burning Moon’ and their recent acoustic record ‘A Season In Hull’, ‘Bamboo Diner In The Rain’ sees The Wave Pictures battling against the robot music apocalypse.

The new album is a bluesy, boozy love letter to the guitar, filled with American Primitive instrumentals, John Lee Hooker chugs and Link Wray style minor-key surf music. As songwriter and guitarist Dave Tattersall explains, “This album is set in the Bamboo Diner of my dreams, with rain beating on the windows and a jukebox stocked with blues. This is the most personal album I’ve made so far. In fact, that’s the whole idea of the band, to become more and more authentically ourselves on record. To grow inwards. Like everything on this dark and strange little album. It’s not robot music.”

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Martha Wainwright releases a wonderful new studio album, ‘Goodnight City’, on [PIAS]. It’s the follow up to her acclaimed 2012 release ‘Come Home To Mama’.

‘Goodnight City’ features 12 brand new songs produced by Thomas Bartlett (Surfjan Stevens, Glen Hansard) and longtime producer Brad Albetta. It recalls the emotional rawness of her debut album, much of it encapsulated by the captivating lead track ‘Around The Bend’ and her extraordinary voice.

“Making ‘Goodnight City’ was the most fun I’ve had in a long time,” Martha admits. “Thomas (keys), Brad (electric / bass), Phil Melanson (drums) and I would sit in a circle and work out arrangements for these vividly different songs. Recording them live with very few overdubs the focus remains on the integrity of the song and our ability to play together as a band.”

Martha wrote half the songs on the album while the other half were written by friends and relatives: Beth Orton, Glen Hansard, Rufus, Wainwright, Michael Ondaatje and Merrill Garbus of tUnE-yArDs.

“Because these writers know me and because I was able to personalise these songs by changing things here and there, I made them feel as if I wrote them myself,” Martha explains. “Somehow they wonderfully reflect my life and I am so thankful to the other artists for writing them.”

‘Goodnight City’ was recorded in Montreal. Last year Martha and Lucy Wainwright Roche released ‘Songs In The Dark’ as the Wainwright Sisters.

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As massive and hefty as a cinder block, Pink Floyd‘s The Early Years 1965-1972 is no conventional box set. It is an archive in miniature, offering 28 discs — 11 CDs with the remaining discs being DVDs and Blu-Rays that offer duplicates of the same audio/visual material — alongside replicas of original poster art, fliers, press releases, 7″ singles and ticket stubs, all here to offer a deep, multi-tiered portrait of the years when Pink Floyd were fumbling around trying to find their voice. This isn’t precisely uncovered territory — during the eight years covered on this box set, Floyd released eight studio albums, and their early singles have been compiled on several collections, including 1971’s Relics — but what’s available on this box is almost entirely rare, with much of it being unheard and unbootleged. This isn’t limited to the audio tracks, either. The DVDs and Blu-Rays offer a cornucopia of stunning films, ranging from promo clips and BBC performances to interviews between Syd Barrett and Dick Clark, full live sets, documentaries, a version of “Interstellar Overdrive” with Frank Zappa from 1969, a ballet from 1972, rejected animations, and the entirety of More and Obscured by Clouds, two feature films Pink Floyd scored.

Sleigh Bells, Derek Miller and Alexis Krauss, have announced their first new album in three years. Entitled Jessica Rabbit, the album was produced by the band and mixed by Andrew Dawson (Kanye West, Tyler, the Creator); and for the first time ever they brought someone outside of the band into the creative process, working with Mike Elizondo (Dr. Dre, Fiona Apple) to shape five of the band’s favourite tracks on the album.

The result is an album that does not sound like anything Sleigh Bells has ever done – or anyone has ever done, for that matter. It is the sonic equivalent of firing synapses, with melodies zigzagging in different directions in a beautiful and ever-modulating controlled chaos. It is playful but darkly so; flirtatious but caustic; ebullient but downright sinister. It is a record that is wholly unique in sound and purpose, an unabashed and unafraid statement from a band that has made offending rote conceptions of pop music their signature and greatest strength.

Released as a companion to Robbie Robertson‘s 2016 memoir of the same name, Testimony is the singer/songwriter’s own take on his musical history — an 18-track compilation that samples from every era of his career, from his time supporting Ronnie Hawkins to his stabs at moody trip-hop. While the book ends when the Band disbands, Testimony finds space for selections from his solo career — five songs total, with 1991’s Storyville earning the largest play and the electronica aspects of 1998’s Contract from the Underworld of Red Boy and 2011’s How to Become Clairvoyant diminished. Still, the Band naturally figures heavily into the equation here, but Robertson avoids his biggest hits along with some of his best-known songs. Instead, he culls heavily from the Band‘s Live at the Academy of Music 1971 performance — it’s better known as the 1972 LP Rock of Ages — and the 2005 Band box A Musical History, which is where all the early cuts from Levon Helm & the Hawks and the Robertson-sung “Twilight (Song Sketch)” were first released. If Testimony is light on rarities, what matters is context. By piecing together all these elements of his career — including his time backing Hawkins(“Come Love”) and Bob Dylan (“Rainy Day Women #12 & 35” from Before the Flood) — he paints a fairly rich portrait of his musical achievements, so Testimony does indeed wind up being a musical memoir.

Wolf People – This London-birthed four-piece have long been hailed as a band with the alchemical charge to transform psychedelic, folk and riff-rock spirits into something both timeless and vibrant, avoiding the lure of retro pastiche. ‘Ruins’ however is unquestionably their greatest achievement to date, reinventing the earthy roar of ampstacks and a quintessentially English pastoral sensibility, and finding transformational ways to draw the cosmic dots between 1971 and 2016. The theme of this album may be a world in which nature has overcome the end of humanity, but the post-apocalyptic landscape has never sounded peachier.

Arriving on the heels of her 2015 road memoir Don’t Suck, Don’t Die: Giving Up Vic Chesnutt, which focused on Kristin Hersh’s long friendship with the late singer/songwriter, Wyatt at the Coyote Palace delivers another audio-visual experience via a 24-track LP and an accompanying hardback book stocked with lyrics, notes, essays, and photographs. Published through her own co-founded nonprofit organization CASH Music, the double album is a purely Hersh-oriented affair, with the alt-rock hero handling all of the parts. Having that kind of freedom can be a creative death knell for some artists, but Hersh has always operated in another realm, both sonically and lyrically, and she takes to the open-ended format with gusto. Opener “Bright” starts off on familiar ground, with Hersh fingerpicking one of her signature spectral melodies. However, things begin to shift gears quickly, with wild swaths of dissonance rolling in like downed wires. Hersh’s voice remains electric, if not a bit rawer than usual, and her knack for pairing big, circular pop hooks with dreamlike lyrics and rhythmic left turns remains intact. When all of those pistons start to pump, as is the case on standout cuts “Hemingway’s Tell,” “Diving Bell,” and “Between Piety and Desire,” the results can be hair-raising, but at just over 80 minutes of material, there’s a lot to digest here. It’s easy to stand on the sidelines and say that a more streamlined, ten- to 12-track version of the album would suffice, but one of the many things that’s helped to make Hersh such a singular talent over the years is her unwillingness to compromise, and on that front, the punishing and beautiful Wyatt at the Coyote Palace doesn’t disappoint.

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The Wave Pictures return with a brand new, vinyl only album called A Season in Hull, due out on 12th February on their own label Wymeswold Records. The album was recorded on acoustic guitars in one room, with a bunch of their friends, live in to one microphone on singer Dave Tattersall’s birthday, January 28th, 2015. The songs were written as quickly as possible and the recording captures that specific moment in all its spontaneous, thrilling and immediate glory. As Tattersall elaborates: “That’s what this is – a one-microphone happy birthday recording.”

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The Wave Pictures don’t like to hang around.
The band are famously productive, churning out a full Billy Childish collaboration (‘Great Big Flamingo Burning Moon’) and an acoustic album (‘A Season In Hull‘) over the past 12 months.
Not content with this ferocious work-rate, The Wave Pictures have now pierced together another album of entirely new material.
‘Bamboo Diner In The Rain’ is packed with those acerbic, offbeat observations that made the band so loved, sluiced through a jagged blues template. An awkward, defiantly English sense of groove pervades, a little like an indie pop version of Dr Feelgood, viewed from The Wave Pictures‘ wholly unique vantage point.
Dave Tattersall explains: “This album is set in the Bamboo Diner of my dreams, with rain beating on the windows and a jukebox stocked with blues.”
‘The Running Man’ is the perfect example. The title references an Arnold Schwarzenegger film, but in reality it’s the taut depiction of a relationship that is falling apart.

The Running Man appears on The Wave Picture’s forthcoming album ‘Bamboo Diner In The Rain’ released on 11th November 2016:
November Tour
3 Manchester Deaf Institute
4 Halifax Arden Road Social Club
5 Sheffield Plug
6 Nottingham The Maze
7 Cambridge The Portman Arms
8 Leeds The Brudenell Social Club
9 Hull Adelphi
10 Edinburgh The Electric Circus
12 Glasgow CCA/Saramago Café Bar
13 Newcastle Cluny 2
14 Birmingham Hare and Hounds
20 Bristol Start The Bus
21 Brighton Komedia Brighton

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I recorded Little Martha in one day with Simon Trought at the old Soup Studio, underneath the Duke of Uke ukulele shop on Hanbury Street, just off Brick Lane in East London. There are no overdubs on the album, which was recorded live with one microphone. Franic Rozycki stopped by to play mandolin on a couple of tracks, but otherwise it’s entirely me playing acoustic guitar. There are no vocals on the album.

I love guitar players. For every songwriter I like, there are a hundred guitarists who impress me. There are too many that I enjoy listening to to mention them all, but there are a few key influences on this particular record that are worth naming: American guitarists like Reverend Gary Davis, Leo Kottke, Blind Blake and Ry Cooder. John Fahey, who started recording in 1959, was one of the first guys to get me hooked on instrumental fingerpicking guitar. He plays with a simple thumb-and-two-fingers right hand technique, nice and slow. His music contains tremendous power and mystery, yet it is easy to grasp exactly what he is doing. He called himself an ”American Primitive”, which in technical terms I suppose is true, but his ideas are very strange and sophisticated, particularly in his synthesis of 20th century European classical music and (American) folk and blues. I cover a number of his tunes on the album, and I clumsily attempt to copy his style a little on the ones I wrote. More than anyone else, the album is a tribute to Fahey and to my love of his music, which I have listened to for 20 years now and still find fascinating. We even copied the simple black-on-white style of Fahey’s Blind Joe Death LP cover when we made the sleeve.

From the age of 9 until I was about 16, this was all I played: acoustic guitar instrumentals like the kind on this album. I abandoned this practise when I started writing songs and formed The Wave Pictures. It was really nice for me to go back to this way of playing that means so much to me, after 14 years playing rock music. I had a lot of fun learning the tunes, developing big blisters on my fingers again, practising for hours in the bathroom where the acoustics are better. And it was a pleasure, as always, to record with Simon. It’s nice to show a different side of yourself every so often. I am so happy I got to make this record and that WIAIWYA records kindly decided to release it.

David Tattersall, August 2012

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Hot on the heels of their Stanley Brinks collaboration (Gin)The Wave Pictures are have announced a brand new album, Great Big Flamingo Burning Moon, which was created in collaboration with one of their all time heroes, Billy Childish.

Bursting with energy and ignited with a garage-rock spark, the album rings loud and bold, showcasing Dave Tattersall’s searing guitar solos and sharp lyrical wit. The album will be released via Moshi Moshi on 16th February, listen to first single, ‘Pea Green Coat’

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‘Pea Green Coat’ is the last song on the record, but the first song that Dave Tattersall and Billy Childish wrote together. The music is all Billy’s including guitar on the thrilling giant riff running through the song, with brilliant Brit-blues harmonica from studio engineer Jim Riley. Lyrically, Dave lets rip with his signature word-play and fantastical imagery; “I really did see someone wearing a pea green coat, seeming somewhat lost in a crowd of black coats, in St Pancras station once, and I wished that they were waiting for me. That image stuck in my mind for years, and came out here.” Great Big Flamingo Burning Moon” was recorded entirely using Billy Childish’s equipment, including his 60s Selmer amps, a 60s drum kit and his rocket-ship shaped guitars. Billy helped to bring out a different side to The Wave Pictures and inject a renewed enthusiasm to the recording process. Tattersall said that he; “was a joy to work with and we love the record. It was the most fun we’ve ever had making a record and to us it’s the most exciting sounding thing we’ve ever done.”

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Stanley Brinks may still be best known as André Herman Dune, but leaving the band eight years ago has neither slowed nor reduced the quality of his output. In fact he’s become something of a wandering, lo-fi Indie-Folk minstrel, collaborating with anyone and everyone and being almost worryingly prolific. It’s a trait he shares with his most recent collaborators The Wave Pictures.

This is the second time Stanley’ has collaborated with the trio, and based on the quality of the output here they’re a match made in heaven especially if you witnessed their sublime set at the “Green Man” Festival last summer in the cinema tent a definate highlight of the weekend . One of my favourite guitar players David Tattersall‘s mind-blowing guitar solos and the bands oft forgotten brilliant rhythm sections are the perfect foil to Stanley’s unique and some might say slightly wonky, world view, and the results are brilliant, very odd and wryly hilarious!