Posts Tagged ‘Eddie Kramer’

Experience Hendrix and Legacy Recordings have announced a brand-new collection that celebrates The Jimi Hendrix Experience’s near-mythic performances on Maui, Hawaii in 1970. Live In Maui brings together audio and video with a new feature-length documentary called Music, Money, Madness: Jimi Hendrix In Maui. The collection will be available in 2-CD/Blu-ray and 3-LP/Blu-ray configurations, all due on November 20th.

Hendrix’s performances on Maui in 1970 caught him at another pivotal point in his too-short career. Following the success of Electric Ladyland, he alternated between playing arenas and festivals with his revamped Experience alongside bandmates Billy Cox (bass) and Mitch Mitchell (drums), and overseeing the creation of his state-of-the-art Greenwich Village studio, Electric Lady Studios. In need of additional financing to complete building the studio, manager Michael Jeffery convinced Warner Bros. to advance Hendrix $500,000.00. The studio would also finance a film to be shot in Maui: Rainbow Bridge. Warner would then receive the soundtrack rights to the exclusive Hendrix music in the movie.

The impressionistic film, directed by Chuck Wein, would explore themes of enlightenment, with the titular rainbow bridge connecting the enlightened and unenlightened worlds. It wasn’t much of a concert movie, though, as only 17 minutes of footage were included from the free show Hendrix held on a Maui cattle ranch on July 30th, 1970 (one day before a Honolulu arena performance). Even those weren’t “pure” as Mitch Mitchell had to re-record his parts at the recently-opened Electric Lady to make the footage useable. Sadly, Jimi Hendrix was gone before the film was ever completed. He died in London on September 18th, 1970. Upon the film’s release in 1971, fans were confused by it as well as the meticulously overdubbed soundtrack album which premiered Hendrix studio material but didn’t actually include any music from the film or the two Maui sets.

Director John McDermott’s new documentary film chronicles the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s visit to Maui and the story of the film by incorporating period footage with new interviews with Chuck Wein, Billy Cox, Eddie Kramer, and others key figures. It’s presented in both editions of Experience Hendrix/Legacy’s release on Blu-ray, and the discs will also feature all of the existing 16mm colour footage from the two afternoon sets captured on July 30th, 1970 mixed in stereo and 5.1 surround.

The accompanying 2-CD set features Hendrix, Billy Cox, and Mitch Mitchell’s restored Maui sets, newly mixed by Eddie Kramer and mastered by Bernie Grundman. “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” has been released as a preview single for the box. “Jimi loved adventure and there was certainly no shortage of it during his time in Hawaii, a place he also loved,” comments Janie Hendrix in the press release. “The back story of Rainbow Bridge and these recordings paint a picture of Jimi’s uncanny ability to turn the bizarre into something amazing! We’re excited about this release because it gives the world a closer look at Jimi’s genius.”

“Live in Maui” due on November 20th.

Jimi Hendrix

The Jimi Hendrix Experience’s Electric Ladyland is being reissued with a massive 50th anniversary deluxe box set. Due on November. 9th, the album will be available as either a three-CD/Blu-ray set or a six-LP/Blu-ray set.

Both packages include the original double album, which has been newly remastered from the original analog tapes. The vinyl set features an all-analog direct-to-disc vinyl transfer. Among the set’s other highlights are Electric Ladyland: The Early Takes, which features demos and studio outtakes from the era; an expanded documentary on the making of Electric Ladyland; a book containing handwritten lyrics and unseen photos; Live at the Hollywood Bowl 14/9/68, a recently discovered two-track soundboard recording that’s part of Experience Hendrix’s Dagger Records official bootleg series; the feature-length documentary At Last … the Beginning: The Making of ‘Electric Ladyland’; and a new 5.1 surround sound mix of the album by original Hendrix engineer Eddie Kramer.

Hollywood Bowl Cover

Initially released on October. 16th, 1968, this was the third album by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the first produced by Hendrix himself and the last studio effort to arrive during his lifetime. Signature tracks include “Voodoo Child (Slight Return),” “Crosstown Traffic” and his definitive cover of Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower.”

“Electric Ladyland is a complete work. He pushed the limit musically; it went in different directions,” Kramer says in the video preview below. “It’s a body of work that Jimi was in control of right from the beginning. This is the definitive album that Jimi created.”

This never-before-released 1968 performance at the Hollywood Bowl “captures the band and the mounting excitement that took place just weeks before the release of Electric Ladyland,” according to pre-release materials.

The late Linda Eastman (McCartney) took the updated cover art, which finds the Jimi Hendrix Experience and a group children at the statue of Alice in Wonderland in New York’s Central Park. This was actually Hendrix’s choice for the album cover image, though it was later relegated to the inside of the U.S. version. The U.K. edition infamously featured a gatefold photo of 19 naked women instead, a decision Hendrix never agreed with.

Jimi Hendrix / Electric Ladyland 50th anniversary super deluxe edition

This period found Hendrix expanding his musical sphere with a series of collaborators as his relationship with Experience bassist Noel Redding deteriorated. Jefferson Airplane’s Jack Casady played bass on “Voodoo Chile,” while Hendrix took over on many of the other tracks – including “All Along the Watchtower.” Other guest stars on Electric Ladyland include Steve Winwood, Chris Wood and Dave Mason of Traffic; Al Kooper; and Hendrix’s future Band of Gypsys bandmate Buddy Miles.

The volume of outtakes, Electric Ladyland: The Early Takes, contains audio pulled from reel-to-reel tapes Hendrix recorded himself on his personal Teac machine in March 1968 while staying at Manhattan’s Drake Hotel. These include early versions of “Voodoo Chile” and “Gypsy Eyes” as well as two songs that didn’t make the Ladyland finaltrack list – “Angel” and “My Friend”– and an early version of “… And the Gods Made Love” titled “At Lastthe Beginning.”  “He did these incredibly quietly,” Kramer says with a laugh. “You can hear the atmosphere of the hotel room. He’s almost whispering. Why? He doesn’t want to wake up the neighbors. He’d go, ‘Here’s “Electric Ladyland”‘ and he’d whisper, ‘Have you ever been? … ‘ It’s so warm and so intimate, and all of a sudden you hear a phone ringing and that’s the front desk calling and you can just hear in his voice he’s getting really pissed off. It’s great.”

Previously unreleased versions of “Angel Caterina” and “Little Miss Strange” on The Early Takes also feature a guest appearance by Stephen Stills. Kramer’s new 5.1 surround-sound remix showcases uncompressed 24 bit/96 kz high resolution audio, a first for a Hendrix studio album.

Both Sides Of The Sky is the final volume in a trilogy of albums (with 2010’s Valleys of Neptune and 2013’s People, Hell and Angels) intended to present the best and most significant unissued studio recordings remaining in the Jimi Hendrix’s archive. The album features appearances by Stephen Stills, Johnny Winter, and Lonnie Youngblood and includes 10 studio tracks that have never seen release. available on CD, digital, and as a numbered 180-gram audiophile vinyl 2LP.

Experience Jimi Hendrix like you never have before: A new John Vondracek-directed music video was unveiled on Friday, featuring a previously unreleased song from the late artist, titled “Lover Man” The music video features archival footage of the legendary guitarist performing the song on his iconic “Flying V” guitar, cut between montages of home movies and photographs from Hendrix’s studio sessions. All of this is seen through a trippy, kaleidoscope-like filter.

The psychedelic music video came along with the release of the new Hendrix album titled Both Sides of the Sky, announced last year. This Eddie Kramer-produced album .

Hendrix apparently inserted the theme of the ‘60s-era TV series Batman into this particular recording. This segment can be heard starting at 1:43. The musician would reportedly add these guitar licks to his music to keep things interesting during long recording sessions. “He’d do something really silly and stupid and everybody would be cracking up,” Hendrix’s producer Eddie Kramer “He wanted to keep it light. He’d also do it to change it up a bit and inevitably those lines would work themselves into songs, and that’s Jimi’s sly humor.”

Jimi Hendrix, 'Jimi Plays Monterey' (1986)

These nine songs from the iconic, guitar-charring 1967 show have appeared in many editions, first as the incomplete Historic Performances Recorded at the Monterey International Pop Festival, a wonderfully strange split album which contained about half of the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s set and all of Otis Redding’s. The complete 1986 edition marked the first full performance, wherein Hendrix updates the blues “Killing Floor”, shouts out his hero Bob Dylan (“Like a Rolling Stone”), turns one garage rock standard into electric mourning “Hey Joe” and soaks another one in feedback before soaking it in lighter fluid and creating the most important free noise coda ever caught on tape

Monterey Festival helped launch the careers of many performers, catapulting them from local, or relative obscurity, into the forefront of American and worldwide awareness. Today it’s easy to forget that before Monterey Jimi Hendrix had not had a hit record in America. Neither had The Who managed to get a record into the Billboard Top 20 and only one of their four minor hits had got higher than No.51; nor was Otis Redding very well known among white audiences. Rolling Stone, Brian Jones was there according to one report he was, “In a mind shattering gold lame coat festooned with beads, crystal swastika & lace, looked like a kind of unofficial King of the Festival” Brian Jones was the king of Hippie-chic

Back in 1967 Jimi Hendrix made his US live debut with The Experience at the Monterey Pop Festival. .
Please check out the DVD “ Hendrix Live at Montery “
The DVD has been digitally remastered and mixed in 5.1 Surround Sound by Jimi’s original sound recording engineer, Eddie Kramer. The picture quality is sharp as a razor, almost impeccable. The original analogue recording mixed in 5.1 is raw, punchy, dangerous and exciting.
The film footage is crystal clear, almost three dimensional. There is no no sign of grain. It’s like you are watching a rock’n’roll hologram.
Live at Monterey, continues to celebrate the genius that is Jimi Hendrix.
It’s Hendrix at his most exciting; a raw, untamed, sexually explicit and pulsating guitar performance from one of the greatest guitarists known to man.
What really gives this release the ultimate rush, are the extras. The DVD is steeped with several documentaries including the brand new film American Landing.
48 years ago. Live at Monterey is a masterpiece.

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