Posts Tagged ‘Iceage’

Fuzz Club Eindhoven 2019: Kikagaku Moyo + The Soft Moon + Iceage e.a.

Fuzz Club, organised by the label of the same name in partnership with Eindhoven Psych Lab, in that city’s imperious Effenaar venue, is ostensibly a ‘psych fest’. It’s a little steelier than most, perhaps – there is more psychedelia of the skull-crushing, motoric and guitar-based variety than there are whacked-out interdimensional synth voyages – but psychedelia it remains.

In the wider world, psych is somewhat on the wane in 2018, having hit a soaring high four or five years ago. In Liverpool, the annual International Festival of Psychedelia – one of Europe’s largest – was the undisputed daddy of the Scouse music calendar, a cosmic celebration imbued with a sense of starry-eyed optimism, a friendliness and community spirit.

After last year’s Fuzz Club Eindhoven, and before our ears had even stopped ringing, The Fuzz Club promoters began working on round two. Today we’re unbelievably excited to share the first seventeen bands who are set to play at FCE19 – taking place once again at the Effenaar over August 23rd-24th. You can find the line-up as it stands as well as a link to early-bird tickets below.

So, topping the bill will be everyone’s favourite Japanese mavericks Kikagaku Moyo, who will be bringing their transcendental blend of minimalist psychedelia, Eastern folk and krautrock. Also joining them will be Iceage and their twisted post-punk drawl and The Soft Moon, whose pounding cocktail of industrial, EBM and darkwave will be shaking floors in the early hours.

On top that there will be The KVB’s icy synth-pop, the shadowy drone-rock of Tess Parks and shoegazing legends The Warlocks and The Telescopes. Plus further Japanese hypnosis courtesy of Minami Deutsch, synth-punk workouts from Rendez-Vous and droning garage-psych from Alan Vega proteges The Vacant Lots. Oakland cosmonauts Lumerians, Chilean heavyweights Vuelveteloca and South African noise-pop duo Medicine Boy. We’ll also be bringing back Berlin post-punk outfit The Underground Youth and Porto krautrockers 10 000 Russos.

Bands for 2019 + more to be announced
Kikagaku Moyo, The Soft Moon, Iceage, The KVB, Tess Parks, The Underground Youth, The Warlocks, The Telescopes, The Vacant Lots, Lumerians , Whispering Sons, Rendez-Vous, Iguana Death Cult, Minami Deutsch, 10 000 Russos, Medicine Boy en Vuelveteloca.

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ICEAGE – ” Balm Of Gilead “

Posted: November 26, 2018 in MUSIC
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Image may contain: 4 people, indoor

Danish punks turned post-punks Iceage released their new single “Balm of Gilead” on Monday morning ahead of their North American tour co-headlining tour with Black Lips. The new song follows the release of Iceage’s excellent fourth album Beyondless, which came out in May. Tjhe band described the recent full-length as furthering “a fascination with goth Americana” and “the simplistic, emotive melodies of their earliest records and the explosive, multi-instrumentation of their newfound love of texture.”

From the split 7″ with Black Lips, available exclusively on tour.

Beyondless

Ever since their first LP, New Brigade, appeared at the beginning of this decade, the Danish quartet Iceage have been buzzed about in particular punk and indie circles.

We’ve heard four stellar singles from Iceage’s fourth studio album, “Beyondless”: “The Day the Music Dies,” “Pain Killer” featuring Sky Ferreira, “Take It All” and “Catch It.” “The Day the Music Dies” combines raunchy brass, frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s sassy lead vocals and driving keyboards into a theatrical, Rolling Stones-esque stomper with Rønnenfelt drowning in anxiety (“How can one kill an impulsion / When it’s still kicking and breathing”) and restlessness (“The future’s never starting / The present never ends”).

From the new album ‘Beyondless’ out May 4th on Matador Records

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Each new song Iceage have released ahead of Beyondless has revealed it’s an album to get excited for, but this one just might be the most intriguing of the bunch. Surrounded by haggard, chain-smoking rockers and arid, brooding slow-burners, “Take It All” instead conjures up the just-left-of-reality experiences of dream states. Iceage have never recorded a song so elusive yet so emotive.

“The Day the Music Dies” combines raunchy brass, frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s sassy lead vocals and driving keyboards into a theatrical, Rolling Stones-esque stomper with Rønnenfelt drowning in anxiety (“How can one kill an impulsion / When it’s still kicking and breathing”) and restlessness (“The future’s never starting / The present never ends”).

From the new album ‘Beyondless’ out May 4th on Matador Records.

Image may contain: 4 people, indoor

Danish post-punk band Iceage have shared another new track from the band’s forthcoming  fourth studio album  Beyondless, due out on May 4th via Matador Records.

“Take It All” is the third single from their new album and it follows the release of “Catch It” and “Pain Killer,” the latter of which featured guest vocals from Sky Ferreira.
“Catch It” was the band’s first single since their 2013 album Plowing Into The Field of Love,

Their brand new single, “Take It All,” features marching drums, twinkling yet murky guitars and frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt mourning the state of the planet (“the world is a crime”) before becoming distracted and utterly mesmerized by the beauty of another human. Rønnenfelt sings as he is reluctantly entranced, “And men were dying for the death of the west / Oh yeah / And the last thing I ever wanted to see was these brand new sparkles / Coming from your ever loving God damned eyes.”

A statement described the sound and themes from the band’s new album, Beyondless:

The intoxication is consistent, this has always been drunk music, but it’s less a stumbling confusion and more a sturdy heartfelt confession with each record. They have finally caught up with their ambition. Their entire charm has always rested in their running ahead of themselves with blind confidence, taunting you to follow and you follow because wherever they are going is vital, is alive; on Beyondless they are treading with an assurance that is disarming, but there is no loss of charm, you are arm in arm now, whispering intimacies.

 

Copenhagen’s Iceage Elias Bender Rønnenfelt (vocals, lyrics), Jakob Tvilling Pless (bass), Dan Kjær Nielsen (drums), and Johan Wieth (guitar) — will release their fourth album, ‘Beyondless’, on May 4th. After returning last month with ‘Catch It’, their first new material since 2013’s ‘Plowing Into The Field of Love’, Iceage now share Beyondless’s “Pain Killer”, featuring Sky Ferreira (the first guest vocalist to ever be featured on an Iceage song). Additionally, the band is announcing March residencies in New York and Los Angeles and dates in Japan in April, with their previously announced European and North American tours to follow in May and June. It was produced by the band and Nis Bysted, recorded by Mattias Glavå at Kungsten Studios Göteberg, and mixed by Randall Dunn at Avast Studios Seattle. The album was played entirely by the band with additional performances by Nils Gröndhal (violin), horns by Kasper Tranberg (trumpet), Lars Greve (saxophones) and Morten Jessen (trombone),

From the new album ‘Beyondless’ out May 4th on Matador Records.

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Iceage are a four-piece band from Copenhagen, Denmark signed to Matador Records that make punk-rock of a darker tone than most. ‘Catch It’ is the band’s first release in four years which features a poetic lyrical delivery from lead singer Elias Bender Rønnenfelt in his typical dingy fashion, chopped up with a contrasting guitar solo for added reflection.

On “Catch It,” he delivers one of his most emotive vocal performances yet. Over a simple, lurching chord progression, he groans and seethes into the mic, telling his story as with the wrinkles in his voice as with his words. Because there are only a few notes in the new single’s vocal melody, Rønnenfelt has more of a chance to modulate the texture of his voice. Rønnenfelt has the power to imbue even the simplest words with a distinctly dangerous aura: “You want it, you want it, you want it again/Why don’t you come and ask me?/I adore you, my friend,” he sings with what could be hint of malice. When “Catch It” slows to a false ending and then spins back up into a raucous, unhinged instrumental climax, it only makes his come-on sound like it could double as a threat.

Band Members
Dan Kjær Nielsen
Elias Bender Rønnenfelt
Johan Wieth
Jakob Tvilling Pless