Posts Tagged ‘Matador Records’

No Home Record

More than 35 years after co-founding Sonic Youth, Kim Gordon has announced that she will release her debut solo album. The new LP – dubbed “No Home Record” – will drop on October. 11th via Matador Records.

“‘Why a solo record? And why now?,’” Gordon was questioned via press release. “I don’t know, but it wouldn’t have happened without the persistence of [producer] Justin Raisen. Living in LA the last few years it feels like home, but the transience of the place makes it feel sometimes like no home.”

The announcement comes with the music video for a new single, “Sketch Artist.” In it, Gordon portrays a ride-share driver (for a company called “Unter”), while “Broad City” star Abbi Jacobson makes a cameo.

From Kim Gordon’s new album ‘”No Home Record” released on Matador Records on October 11th.

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On the heels of her triumphant Matador Records debut Turn Out the Lights and the critically acclaimed collaborative EP boygenius, JulienBaker returns with her first new solo recordings in 18 months, “Red Door” b/w “Conversation Piece,” available exclusively for Record Store Day 2019. The 7″ features the first studio recording of a fan favorite “Red Door”, previously only heard live, and a previously unreleased cut begun during the Turn Out the Lights sessions, “Red Door” is a lush and atmospheric track driven by Baker’s complex fingerpicking and a hint of slide guitar, her voice soaring as she pleads “set me on fire in the middle of the street / bend my knees, paint the concrete / the color of my bloody knuckles / pulling splinters form the chapel door.” A previously unreleased cut begun during the Turn Out the Lights sessions, Its flip side “Conversation Piece” is a meditation on loneliness, backed by delicate percussion and chiming guitars.

“Conversation Piece.” Julien Baker’ s Turn Out the Lights received glowing reviews across international press outlets and continues to sell steadily, nearing 40k equivalent albums in the U.S. boygenius’ s/t EP has reached 14k scans in its first three months on sale.

Car Seat Headrest today announces Commit Yourself Completely – a new nine-track live album that will be released only via digital means June 17th. Culled from performances across the UK, US and France, the nine-track album spans material from 2016’s breakout Teens Of Denial and 2018’s reimagined epic Twin Fantasy – as well as the first officially released recording of longtime live staple ‘Ivy’ by Frank Ocean. A filmed version of the performance of ‘Fill In The Blank’ which appears on the album, recorded in Columbus, Ohio,

“This is a compilation of songs from shows we played in 2018,” says Will Toledo. “We recorded every show we did that year, and I went through about 50 of them to get the final tracklist for this album. This isn’t necessarily the best possible version of each track, but it’s some of the most fun we’ve had on stage. I particularly remember the show we did in the small French town of Amiens, maybe the smallest show we did that year, and how great it felt to be up in people’s faces with everyone plugging in to the music right away. The recordings we made of the shows came out very clean, so rather than try to artificially recreate how it sounded in the different venues night to night, I tried to give the whole album that in-your-face feeling, like we’re playing the songs right in front of you. When you’re onstage with everything happening at once, you never really know what it sounds like in the room anyways; all you know is how the music is feeling. Hopefully this will give you a sense of what these shows felt like.”

A snapshot of the 7-person lineup featuring members of Naked Giants experienced by crowds worldwide over the last two years, Commit Yourself Completely offers a visceral, loose and ebullient take on these much-loved songs, as well as an an incandescent capstone of a formative touring period as Car Seat Headrest readies his next studio album. Musicians featured on the album are Will Toledo (vocals), Seth Dalby (bass), Ethan Ives (guitar, vocals), Andrew Katz (drums, vocals), Grant Mullen (guitar, vocals) Gianni Aiello (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Henry LaVallee (additional percussion).

From Car Seat Headrest’s live album ‘Commit Yourself Completely’ released June 17th on Matador Records

‘Commit Yourself Completely’

Tracklist:

1. Cosmic Hero (Live at the Tramshed, Cardiff, Wales)
2. Fill In The Blank (Live at Newport Music Hall, Columbus, OH)
3. Drugs With Friends (Live at La Lune des Pirates, Amiens, France)
4. Bodys (Live at La Lune des Pirates, Amiens, France)
5. Cute Thing (Live at O2 Forum Kentish Town, London, England)
6. Drunk Drivers/Killer Whales (Live at O2 Forum Kentish Town, London, England)
7. Destroyed By Hippie Powers (Live at the Crystal Ballroom, Portland, OR)
8. Ivy (live at the Capitol Theater, Olympia, WA)
9. Beach Life-in-Death (Live at Crossroads, KC, Kansas City, MO)

On June 7th, we’ll be reissuing Sonic Youth’s ‘Battery Park, NYC: July 4, 2008’. Initially sold as a bonus item alongside the 2009 release of the band’s final album, ‘The Eternal’, the live recording will now be available on streaming services and as a stand-alone physical package for the first time ever. Culled from their show at Battery Park’s River To River Festival (and broadcast live on WFMU), the setlist spans the band’s 30-year career.

The live version of “Bull In The Heather” is now available

It’s out June 7 via Matador. The show was part of the free River to River Festival (and had The Feelies opening)

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Recorded during time spent in upstate New York with Dave Fridmann, the five songs that make up “A Fine Mess” gradually emerged as a body of work with a narrative and flow unto itself. The title track, and BBC 6 Music-playlisted single Fine Mess then received further production from Kaines and Tom A.D. and mixing from Claudius Mittendorfer, who had first worked with Interpol as engineer on Our Love To Admire. The resulting set is a living, breathing postcard from the band to their fans as they tour the world throughout 2019, and a linear continuation of the visceral and contagious energy set loose with Marauder.

Echoing its title, the artwork for A Fine Mess is illustrated by a series of lost images, recovered from an abandoned police station in Detroit, MI. In a crumbling evidence room – amongst the rubble – an undeveloped roll of film, dated “1-20-96”, featured latent images of a breaking and entering scene, the rooms in chaos.

From the beguiling refrain of the title track, to the soulful topsy-turvy of No Big Deal, cathartic chorus of long sought-after live favourite Real Life, anthemic swell of The Weekend, and angular shades of Thrones, A Fine Mess is a bracing and distinct entry in Interpol’s oeuvre.

Interpol‘s latest album ‘Marauder’ is out now on Matador Records.

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With a multitude of tour dates on either side of the Atlantic promoting her excellent 2018 album, “Historian”, you could forgive Lucy Dacus for taking it easy on the new music for a bit. Thankfully though, you won’t need to, as Lucy has set up an almost Sufjan Stevens’ level of niche musical project, attempting to construct a series of Holiday themed tracks, to be released across 2019 for various days from Christmas and Halloween through to Bruce Springsteen’s Birthday .

This week’s offering comes in the shape of My Mother & I, release to coincide with both Taurus Season, when both Lucy and her mother were born, and the American version of Mother’s day. High concepts aside, My Mother & I is a beautiful track, with no need for a backstory. The track is both a reflection on all sorts of shared characteristics mother and child can share, from problems with body image through to the shared stubbornness and empathy traditionally associated with those babies born in the month of May. Lucy puts it far better than we ever could, ‘We — daughters, and all children — easily inherit the shame and fear of our mothers, but also the pride, self-assurance, and lessons of love.” If you weren’t already excited about the remaining holidays in 2019 already, Lucy Dacus has given us all plenty to be thrilled about.

My Mother & I is out now via Matador Records.

Interpol have shared new track ‘The Weekend’ and announced the upcoming EP ‘A Fine Mess’. Check out all details . After the surprise release of the title track ‘A Fine Mess‘ back in January, now the NYC trio have announced the release of a five track EP in the run-up to their packed summer festival schedule. The latest offering comes with ‘The Weekend’, another new track following on from the dark and raucous mood of 2018’s acclaimed ‘Marauder‘.

Following their successful Australian tour, Interpol have released a new single.

“These are all upbeat rockers,” said frontman Paul Banks . “They’re not b-sides. They’re all pretty rich rock songs with big choruses. It’s all material that we can see being played in a club with people dancing. Sometimes when you turn on an Interpol record you expect people to not be dancing because it’s coming from a more pensive or melancholy place. This is a place rocking EP.”

Due for release on May 17th, the EP was recorded during recent downtime in Upstate New York with Dave Fridmann.

“We had the idea of the EP to be a separate batch of songs to be part of this whole campaign,” Banks said. “We’ve refined the material since then. It’s not like ‘Marauder songs on the EP’, it was always supposed to be a separate EP and a body of work in its own right. “It’s a good way to interact with fans these days. In hip-hop they put out mixtapes between records and it’s a good method. We’re engaged and active right now so it’s good to double down and turn the party up a notch.”

So with the band so engaged, will we hear more new material in the near future?

“I don’t know if we’re going to step into the world of doing a series of EPs,” Banks added. “I think it’s more likely that the next thing we do will be a full-length record, but who can say? We don’t actually have any concrete plans beyond this EP.” . Among the five new songs is ‘Real Life’, which was aired on the band’s ‘Turn On The Bright Lights’ 15th anniversary tour back in 2017. The band have a celebrated history of renewing old rarities and releasing them, however it sounds like their isn’t too much left in the vault.

“We might have exhausted the stores a little at this point,” Banks admitted. “I don’t hate the idea of putting out all the old material and cleaning out the archive to share that stuff, but I am more interested in new material.” As for the lyrics of the EP, Banks continued: “’Marauder’ was a little more reflective, and this one’s more about taking the party by the horns. Maybe the lyrics are a little devious and mischievous. There’s no shame to that.”

Interpol’s latest album ‘Marauder’ is out now on Matador Records.

Baker

Memphis, TN-based songwriter Julien Baker is the latest addition to the Matador Records roster. The 21-year-old’s devastating and vulnerable debut album, Sprained Ankle, which was originally released in 2015 and now gets re-released by Matador. The album was recorded at Spacebomb Studios, though Julien’s songs don’t share the down-home gloss of the other albums produced there. Instead of beefing up her honest tunes with rich layering like Natalie Prass or Matthew E. White, Baker pares her songs down to their simplest possible format: alone, singing and playing acoustic guitar directly into the microphone, sometimes in a single take.

That decision resulted in a remarkable record, one full of beautiful, personal explorations revealed in stark intimacy. That choice makes a lot of sense for Baker’s voice, both in the literal and figurative sense. Rather than Prass’ sweet, soaring tones or White’s blue-eyed soul, Sprained Ankle is delivered in reedy whispers and chilled coos. Released just before she turned 20 years old, the record still sounds raw – not that her voice lacks control or power, but rather that the weariness of songs about death, breakups, and existential questioning are sung with incredible presence. They’re coming of age songs from someone still coming of age, the wounds still fresh, the big truths currently being revealed. There are the struggles of depression, drugs, loneliness, but the clear-eyed way she faces it all supersedes any platitude.

LP – The album comes with a new 7″ Funeral Pyre. Only Baker can make a song with such a darkly macabre title so heartbreakingly gorgeous, with her signature hushed-yet-lofty vocals soaring over a quietly fingerpicked melody that crescendos into layered, almost-orchestral beauty. The B-side, Distant Solar System, is another unheard song from the Sprained Ankle sessions.

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Stephen Malkmus has shared an arch, psychedelic new video and song. That track is “Rushing The Acid Frat,” the second single from his upcoming electronically-tinged album Groove Denied, which was previously shelved by Matador Records. His last full-length was last year’s Sparkle Hard with the Jicks. We shared Groove Denied’s last single, “Viktor Borgia” earlier this year.

The slinky Robert Strange- and James Papper directed-video for “Rushing The Acid Frat” portrays a cartoon version of Malkmus, front-and-center, sauntering around an acid-view of Los Angeles locales. Among his stops, Malkmus drops into Koreatown and the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. A whole cast of anthropomorphic animals and objects make cameos as well.

From the new album, ‘Groove Denied’ out March 15th.

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Last summer just a few weeks after Dacus’s highly anticipated LP Historian was released on Matador Records, the Richmond, Va.-based singer/guitarist and her band descended on SXSW for an incredible 17 sets. It was a remarkable feat, especially considering the emotional power packed into Dacus’s music. Here is a major leap forward in just a few short years. Dacus is one of the brightest young songwriters in music right now. Live performances of songs like “Night Shift” and “Pillar of Truth” carried the same impact as they do on Historian, even without the horns and string sections that appear on that remarkable record.

At just 23, Lucy Dacus is well beyond her years. One listen to her sophomore record Historian and you’ll know. The album is a deep meditation on loss and redemption, filled with stories from Dacus’ past and surrounded by crunchy guitars and distortion, a la PJ Harvey and the Pixies. “A lot of the songs revert back to very specific moments, but I didn’t write [them] in the moment,” she says. “They just came out over time the way that they did. There wasn’t this immediate translation from life to song.” Dacus grew up in Richmond, Va., surrounding herself with music her whole life. She started singing early on as a child, graduating to church choir soon after. In middle school, she bought a guitar and started learning chords and, in high school, she finally took the plunge and started writing her own music. After high school, she got the courage to start playing live in front of people. Her first album, 2016’s No Burden, was recorded super lo-fi—no recording budget, no expectations, no fans to consider. She issued it via Richmond upstart label EggHunt Records and it gained the attention of Matador Records, who re-released it, propping her up onto an international stage just like that. When it came time to write Historian, a newfound pressure existed, and she says that an ever-present feeling loomed throughout the recording process. “There’s a responsibility now,” she says. “I don’t take it lightly. It’s not necessarily stressful, but it is a weight.” Dacus’ extreme confessions on songs like “Night Shift,” “Body to Flame” and “Pillar of Truth” are Historian album highlights, but it’s clear that the whole thing has an emotional heft to it that you don’t hear often with early twenty-somethings. “It’s really normal to be anxious,” she says. “There are these immediate pressures— politically, culturally, and within my family or friend groups—[and] there seems to be a lot of confusion in my life. That comes through on the album as me trying to maintain hope throughout those things. I would feel like a failure if that didn’t come through.”

Lucy Dacus is done thinking small. Two years after her 2016 debut, No Burden, won her unanimous acclaim as one of rock’s most promising new voices, Dacus returned with Historian, a remarkably assured 10-track statement of intent. It finds her unafraid to take on the big questions — the life-or-death reckonings, and the ones that just feel that way. It’s a record full of bracing realizations, tearful declarations and moments of hard-won peace, expressed in lyrics that feel destined for countless yearbook quotes and first tattoos.
“This is the album I needed to make,” says Dacus, who views Historian as her definitive statement as a songwriter and musician. “Everything after this is a bonus.”