Posts Tagged ‘Denmark’

May be an image of 5 people, people standing and indoor

Copenhagen’s Iceage will make their Mexican Summer Records debut on May 7th with “Seek Shelter”, their fifth album and first since 2018’s Beyondless. The Danish rockers shared another preview of the album in the form of new single/video “Vendetta” a menacing, yet danceable blues-rock track that moves in a fashion somewhere between swaggering and stumbling. “This ain’t no place for a sightseer,” Rønnenfelt warns, his impressionistic lyrics conjuring hazy images of transaction, exploitation and retribution. He swears vengeance over swaying shakers and drums, rowdy guitars and a monolithic synth hum that swells as “Vendetta” crescendoes, with discordant horns only sending it deeper into its dark downward spiral.

Of the album as a whole, Rønnenfelt had this to say: “When we started, I think we were just lashing out, completely blindfolded with no idea as to why and how we were doing anything. For Seek Shelter, we had a definite vision of how we wanted the album to be carved out, yet still the end result came as a surprise in terms of where we sonically were able to push our boundaries.” 

A decade on from New Brigade, an instant punk record made by four Danish teenagers that came out of nowhere and inspired total devotion around the world, Iceage’s fifth album and label debut is a thrilling new chapter for the band. Produced by Sonic Boom (Pete Kember of Spacemen 3) and mixed by Shawn Everett (HaimThe War on Drugs), Iceage come with a new emotional palette ripe with psychedelic flourishes, romantic piano balladry, invocations of patron saints and even a gospel choir for a song or two. Seek Shelter is a striking new direction for a band at their most expressive and expansive, recorded in a dilapidated wood-paneled Lisbon radio studio with a steady rain dripping through the ceiling. Equipment was arranged around puddles and slowly-filling buckets, garden lamps lit up the high-ceilings and a special record was made.

Sonic Boom (aka Pete Kember) produced the album. It includes “The Holding Hand,” a new song the band shared at the start of the February. The band’s line up features Elias Bender Rønnenfelt, Jakob Tvilling Pless, Johan Surrballe Wieth, and Dan Kjær Nielsen. An additional guitarist, Casper Morilla Fernandez, also joined them to record Seek Shelter, which was mixed by Shawn Everett.

Of the new single, Rønnenfelt had this to say in a press release: “Crime is the undercurrent that runs through everything. If you don’t see it, you’re not looking. In its invincible politics, it is the glue that binds it all together. ‘Vendetta’ is an impartial dance along the illicit lines of infraction.”
 
Director Jonas Bang directed the “Vendetta” video, which features actor Zlatko Burić alongside the band. Bang had this to say: “We wanted it to be less 1:1 story and more short format collage-ish like if you flick through a chapter in a book reading a bit here and there.” 

The band’s previous album, Beyondless, came out in 2018 on Matador Records.

Iceage“Vendetta” from the album ‘Seek Shelter’ out May 7th on Mexican Summer Records, their first for the label.

May be an image of horse and text that says 'K สหง THE NEW ALBUM SEEK SHELTER OUT MAY 7TH 2021'

May be a closeup of one or more people

Ten years on from their debut New Brigade, the Copenhagen band is sharing new song “The Holding Hand” today. Lead singer and lyricist Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s voice crawls over slow-marching percussion, and as scorching guitar and Nils Gröndahl’s piercing violin layer in, the song rises to a noisy peak.

Danish punk outfit Iceage have signed to Mexican Summer and shared their first single for the label, “The Holding Hand.” It comes with a Anders Malmberg-directed video, and it follows their 2020 single “Lockdown Blues.” Iceage’s languorous, beatific rock frequently embodies the pain that arises when things are just out of reach, and “The Holding Hand” is filled with a similar anguish. Throughout the song, Elias Bender Rønnenfelt sings in a near-stupor, as if his emotions are overwhelming to the point of incapacitation, about feeling powerless in a harsh scene of mythological proportions. The over-five-minute track is cloaked in a shadowy echo, slightly unsettling wind chimes and, for added drama, slowly pounding guitars and strings that match the gravitas of this tale.

“The song lives in a slurred world, movements are elastically stretched out and strength is found in weakness while you find it hard to tell the difference between fume and matter,” Rønnenfelt says. “Gently the swaying intensifies, feel it escalate. Reach out for the holding hand, it seems almost within scope now.”

May be an image of text that says 'THE HOLDING HAND'

YUNG – ” Progress “

Posted: February 5, 2021 in MUSIC
Tags: , , ,

The Danish four-piece Yung is back with a new 7” Progress via PNKSLM Recordings. After the release of their debut LP A Youthful Dream through Fat Possum Records in 2016, which followed a series of acclaimed EP’s that brought them the attention of Pitchfork, Stereogum, NPR, The FADER and more, and years of touring heavily, the Aarhus based quartet Yung decided to take a step back.

After some time spent reassessing themselves and finding common ground to push forward, the band returned to the studio to work on a follow-up to their debut record, and now, four years after the release of the debut, the band is set to share the first fruits of that labour in the shape of the new single “Progress”, which is to be released digitally and on 7” vinyl alongside the B-side “New Fast Song”.

Having refined their sound while embracing a wider palette of inspiration, Progress is also a taste of Yung’s new full-length album and their first release with new label partner PNKSLM Recordings.

http://

released September 11th, 2020 nw album out now PNKSLM Recordings.

Photo by Daniel Hjorth

Danish rockers Yung arrived with their debut album, A Youthful Dream, in 2016, and it was filled with punk-laced guitar pop, simultaneously scruffy and sharp, and often life-affirming. Now back with their follow-up, Ongoing Dispute, they sound like they’ve been emotionally tested and are now out to prove something. Their new LP is, at times, tense, as they try to make sense of where they are and where they’re going, but its unexpectedly intricate riffs and fits of rip-roaring joy both cut through and complement that emotional tension. They’re most exuberant and captivating on “Unresolver” a big-hearted track wrapped in stylish post-punk, jangly indie and explosive, warped garage rock.

There’s more to the stormy atmosphere that runs through Ongoing Dispute than that, though, as Silkjær can attest. “I did get my own head out of my ass, for a change!” he laughs. “In the past, I’ve always written about me, and my life, and things that affected me, but this time, I started talking more about things that affect everybody. I was thinking about the things that aren’t working in the world; there are songs about those kinds of problematic structures. There’s a song on the album called ‘Dismantled’; we had to dismantle our self-image as a band to move forwards, and I had to dismantle my self-image as a songwriter, too.”

Recorded over two sessions at Dreamland Studio and the tiny, now-defunct Studio One (so-called, Silkjær jokes, because you can only fit one person in at a time) and produced by the band’s regular sound tech Neil Robert Young, “Ongoing Dispute” is an ode to perseverance, collaboration and triumph over adversity. It represents the dawning of a new era for the band, the one that A Youthful Dream should have, and the title, says Guldborg Tarp, perfectly encapsulates the dynamic that has driven Yung forwards, out from under that black cloud. “Ultimately, that’s what the writing of this record was – an ongoing dispute. We come in to write and we’re referencing completely different bands, but every time we wrap up a song, we’re excited about it. It reflects the lyrical side of the record, too; it’s like the last few years of coping with the world have been an ongoing dispute for us!”

Yung:

Mikkel Holm Silkjær, Tobias Guldborg Tarp , Frederik Nybo Veile , Emil Korning Zethsen

“Unresolver” · Yung from the album “Ongoing Dispute” on PNKSLM Recordings Released on: 2021-01-22

Yung have taken the long road to this second full-length. By the time they released their debut, A Youthful Dream, it felt less like a launchpad for the Aarhus four-piece and more like a culmination; of years of touring, of a multi-EP trajectory that began with Alter in 2015, and of a transition from a project chiefly centred around the song writing of frontman Mikkel Holm Silkjær to something more fully-formed. The upshot is, right when they should have been celebrating the opening of an exciting new chapter, they actually felt burned out. “It wasn’t that we didn’t like A Youthful Dream,” explains Silkjær. “We just weren’t quite proud of it.”

Accordingly, they took some time to gather themselves. “We were pretty worn down from a lot of touring,” says bassist Tobias Guldborg Tarp, “and there was a lot of banging our heads against the wall when it came to trying to write new songs. We had to step back and think about what we wanted to do as a band, and whether it even made sense to continue.” It was far from plain sailing once they eventually did regroup, towards the end of 2016, for more writing sessions; with Silkjær previously the primary songwriter, coming up with tracks that accommodated the polarised tastes of the individual members was a challenge. Guitarist Emil Zethsen takes his melodic cues from Prince and eighties pop; at the other end of the spectrum, drummer Frederik Nybo Veile is an avowed metalhead. “It was a struggle,” recalls Zethsen. “The four of us rarely agree on anything.”

Eventually, the breakthrough came. ‘Lust and Learning’ is a fizzing synergy of each of the four’s musical predispositions; chiming guitars from Zethsen, a strutting bassline from Guldborg Tarp and soaring backing vocals on the chorus accompany Silkjær as he spins a wistful tale of small-town inertia. It provided the spark for the sessions that birthed the nine tracks comprising Ongoing Dispute, the first Yung record in nearly five years and a compelling argument for the importance of taking your time. Following on from last September’s ‘Progress’ 7”, the album cleverly melds Silkjær’s penchant for krautrock with Zethsen’s handsome riffery and finds room for all four members to bring their influences to the table; the sweeping punk thrash of ‘Unresolver’, for example, gives way to woozy, reflective closer ‘Friends on Ice’ at the back end of the album, whilst elsewhere, the freewheeling rock and roll of ‘Above Water’ recalls Japandroids, and there’s a moody, post-punk edge to the furious ‘Such a Man’. Underlining everything is the atmospheric spectre of Killing Joke, one of the few bands that all four members of Yung cite as an inspiration.

Silkjær acknowledges that, had it not been for the difficulties the band faced in the wake of A Youthful Dream, Ongoing Dispute might never have been possible. “When I listen to it, I can hear a lot of that tension,” he admits. “It was a time when we were struggling financially, coming back off every tour actually owing people money rather than having made any. I can really hear the frustration that comes with an unstable economy in the songs. It was just a big, dark cloud that was hanging over our heads for a long time. We felt as if things were not going our way, and those feelings really manifest themselves on the record.

http://

There’s more to the stormy atmosphere that runs through Ongoing Dispute than that, though, as Silkjær can attest. “I did get my own head out of my ass, for a change!” he laughs. “In the past, I’ve always written about me, and my life, and things that affected me, but this time, I started talking more about things that affect everybody. I was thinking about the things that aren’t working in the world; there are songs about those kinds of problematic structures. There’s a song on the album called ‘Dismantled’; we had to dismantle our self-image as a band to move forwards, and I had to dismantle my self-image as a songwriter, too.”

Recorded over two sessions at Dreamland Studio and the tiny, now-defunct Studio One (so-called, Silkjær jokes, because you can only fit one person in at a time) and produced by the band’s regular sound tech Neil Robert Young, “Ongoing Dispute” is an ode to perseverance, collaboration and triumph over adversity. It represents the dawning of a new era for the band, the one that A Youthful Dream should have, and the title, says Guldborg Tarp, perfectly encapsulates the dynamic that has driven Yung forwards, out from under that black cloud. “Ultimately, that’s what the writing of this record was – an ongoing dispute. We come in to write and we’re referencing completely different bands, but every time we wrap up a song, we’re excited about it. It reflects the lyrical side of the record, too; it’s like the last few years of coping with the world have been an ongoing dispute for us!” 

Yung is Mikkel Holm Silkjær, Tobias Guldborg Tarp, Frederik Nybo Veile and Emil Korning Zethsen

Releases January 22nd, 2021

Written and performed by Yung

Image may contain: 3 people, people standing, tree and outdoor

The introduction to “Friends On Ice” reverberates like the switching on of machinery, the transfer of emotion through engagement or the wheel of cognitive thought ahead of comprehension. The thought-provoking new single by Danish collective Yung is cut from their upcoming LP which arrives this month on PNKSLM Recordings. “Friends on Ice” came about as a consequence of Mikkel being challenged to strum the most difficult guitar chord he could come up with. This approach has since become a go-to suggestion to any kind of creative block we encounter.

The instrumental repetition and momentum that Yung develop in the track seems to embody grief itself, allowing a contemplative and confessional lyrical delivery to drift ghostlike through the mix. On the subject of lyricism, vocalist and songwriter Mikkel Holm Silkjær explains, “It’s a song about alienation, loneliness and the immediate remedies we, as individuals in western society, turn to when confronted with pain or struggle.”

Previous singles taken from the band’s upcoming record – “Such a Man” and “Above Water” – offer a more combative and dynamic post-punk sound, which reveals “Friends On Ice” as a unique feat and a perfect album closer. Mikkel Holm Silkjær reiterates, “Capitalism promotes individualism, which makes a lot of people think they have to deal with issues and problems in life on an individual level, when often we’d be much better off if we dealt with things on a collective level.”

The sophomore record by the Aarhus quartet is entitled “Ongoing Dispute” and arrives January 22nd.

YUNG – ” Progress “

Posted: September 3, 2020 in MUSIC
Tags: , , ,

The Danish four-piece Yung is back with a new 7” “Progress” out September 11th via PNKSLM Recordings. After the release of their debut LP A Youthful Dream through Fat Possum Records in 2016, which followed a series of acclaimed EP’s that brought them the attention of Pitchfork, Stereogum, NPR, The FADER and more, and years of touring heavily, the Aarhus based quartet Yung decided to take a step back.

After some time spent reassessing themselves and finding common ground to push forward, the band returned to the studio to work on a follow-up to their debut record, and now, four years after the release of the debut, the band is set to share the first fruits of that labour in the shape of the new single “Progress”, which is to be released digitally on June 12th and on 7” vinyl alongside the B-side “New Fast Song”.

Having refined their sound while embracing a wider palette of inspiration, Progress is also an early taste of Yung’s next full-length (due early 2021) and their first release with new label partner PNKSLM Recordings.

http://

Releases September 11th, 2020

Danish quartet Yung have shared a new track “New Fast Song,” taken from their forthcoming seven-inch single titled “Progress”, due out on September. 11th via PNKSLM Recordings. It’s their first release since their 2016 debut LP A Youthful Dream, released on Fat Possum. “New Fast Song,” the b-side to the seven-inch title track, is a return to the melodic indie of their debut LP, but there’s less distortion and more warmth this time around. “We keep falling / but I really never see it that way,” they sing with passion over the closing guitar throttle. There’s a sense of poignant restlessness, but a satisfying vigour underpins it all.

Mikkel on the lyrics of the song:
“The lyrics for this one were written in the backseat of a tour van, at the end of a two-week tour of Europe. The last show of that tour was in Madrid and somehow we’d decided that doing the Madrid-Denmark drive without a layover was a reasonable idea.
We got up very early in the morning, packed the van and drove out of Madrid. Did a quick stop to fuel up and stock up on essentials. We had breakfast and I had a lot of coffee. As we hit the road I was hit by an overwhelming amount of emotions. Post-tour blues, joy of returning home, frustration from realising a normal everyday routine would appear in life, a private economy which was barely existing, the beauty of Madrid and all its small and narrow streets and beautiful balconies, an unbelievably hot day and the prospects of being confined in an upright position in the backseat of a tour van the next 2.500 kilometres: All thoughts and sensations that passed through my mind all the while an absurd amount of caffeine rushed through my veins. I can’t really say exactly what these lyrics are about, but all of the emotions above somehow made their way into the song. Maybe it’s a song about the beauty of frustration and hardship. Maybe it was just me trying to make sense out of something which did not make sense at the time.”
XX Yung

“New Fast Song” · Yung PNKSLM Recordings Released on: 2020-08-26

Image may contain: 1 person

Though the word “myrkur” means “darkness” in Icelandic, MYRKUR (aka Amalie Bruun)’s music is far from monochromatic. With its distinct sense of Nordic isolation, MYRKUR’s compositions are at once savage and delicate. Choral and folk elements abound, lending the music a mystical, legendary quality and an untouchable equilibrium between dark and light.

Amalie Bruun has always paved her own path, challenging underground preconceptions of heavy metal ever since the release of her debut Myrkur EP in 2014. Her first two full-length studio albums, 2015’s M and 2017’s Mareridt, recast black metal in the most personal yet expansive of terms, their blending of Amalie’s Danish folk roots with tempestuous internal struggles breathing new life into a subgenre whose followers can be rigidly possessive.

With the release of her new album, “Folkesange”, Amalie Bruun has set out to journey into the very heart of the Scandinavian culture that marked her childhood. Folkesange relinquishes black metal for a refined yet far-reaching evocation of traditional folk, combining songs ancient and new to sublimely resonant effect.

After the nightmare-induced visions that wrought themselves throughout Mareridt, Folkesange offers an emotional sanctuary, a means to reconnect to something permanent and nature-aligned. It’s an awareness that’s become deeply bound to the album’s organic, regenerative spirit, from the opening track Ella’s heartbeat, frame-drum percussion and crystalline vocals that become the grounding for a rapt, richly textured awakening, to the gentle carousel of the closing Vinter, with its nostalgia-steeped connotations of seasonal, snowfall-bewitched awe.

Storytelling, rites of passage, and the invocation of a continuity that passes through time and generation are all part of folk music’s tapestry, and Folkesange taps into all these currents in their most essential form. In part a purist’s approach to the genre, free from over-interpretation and fusion, the use of traditional instruments throughout, such as nyckelharpa, lyre, and mandola offer a deeper, more tactile connection to their source, an unbroken line of communication back to the past.

Image may contain: 1 person

But the album is no museum piece; it resonates in the here and now, aided by the spacious production of Heilung member and musical collaborator Christopher Juul. Cinematic yet intimate, Folkesange exists in a state of boundless reverie, bourne by string-led drones, cyclical, elegiac rhythms and Amalie’s frictionless voice, all carrier signals for deep-rooted, ancestral memories, and associations felt on an elemental level.

It’s a binding of the otherworldly and the earthy that echoes the the subject matter of many of the tales themselves. Written by Amalie, Leaves Of Yggdrasil’s medieval cadences bind tragic love story and mythology, full of both fairytale wonder and deeply human foible. Tor i Helheim, its dreamily persistent rhythm redolent of both innocence and encroachment, is based on a poem from the Icelandic Eddas, relating a journey into the underworld of Hel where the sparse nature of the accompaniment becomes the medium that carries you along in its thrall.

http://

An immersive experience in its own right, but also belonging to a wider, pagan folk-based renaissance that has attracted a devoted following worldwide, Folkesange answers a need that has become ever more pressing in turbulent times. A zeroing in on a resonance that is both intrinsic and enduring, it’s a rediscovery of personal grounding, and an experience that reaches beyond culture to remind us of a shared, deeply rooted inheritance. A tuning fork that binds the personal and the universal, Folkesange is a reminder that the most transcendent experiences are those closest to home.

Released March 20th 2020

2020 Relapse Records

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

Danish musician and songwriter Agnes Obel’s fourth LP, “Myopia”, comes out later this month, and the latest single she’s shared from it is the lovely instrumental interlude “Parliament of Owls.”

‘Parliament Of Owls’ is also one of the highlights of the Danish singer-songwriter’s highly anticipated new album Myopia, which is set for release through Deutsche Grammophon, Universal Music Group’s prestigious Yellow Label, and Blue Note in North America, on 21st February.

Following the same principles as with her previous albums (Philharmonics, Aventine and Citizen Of Glass), which she completed as a one-woman project in her own Berlin home studio, Obel has been under self-imposed creative isolation with the removal of all outside influences and distraction in the writing, recording and mixing process for Myopia.

“The albums I’ve worked on have all required that I build a bubble of some kind in which everything becomes about the album. For me the production is intertwined with the lyrics and story behind the songs,” says Obel. This is precisely what makes her music so compelling and the same is true with Myopia.

“Paradoxically, for me I need to create my own myopia to make music,” she says, speaking of the album’s creation, which saw Obel experimenting with techniques of recording processing, warping and pitching down vocals, strings, piano, celesta and lutheal piano, finding ways to melt these elements together to become one.

In support of Myopia, Agnes Obel will be playing across Europe on a headline tour in Spring 2020, and will be joining Dead Can Dance as their special guest across North America in April and May. Her itinerary kicks off with a sold-out show at London’s Rough Trade East on Myopia’s release date European dates also include two nights at Copenhagen’s KB Hallen (27 and 28 February) and a further London show at the Eventim Apollo on 9 April. Visit the artist’s official website for tickets and further information .

Associated Performer, Piano: Agnes Obel Studio Personnel,, Violin: John Corban , Cello: Kristina Koropecki Composer: Agnes Obel

Myopia is out on 21 February