Posts Tagged ‘Copenhagen’

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Ten years on from their debut New Brigade, the Copenhagen band is sharing new song “The Holding Hand” today. Lead singer and lyricist Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s voice crawls over slow-marching percussion, and as scorching guitar and Nils Gröndahl’s piercing violin layer in, the song rises to a noisy peak.

Danish punk outfit Iceage have signed to Mexican Summer and shared their first single for the label, “The Holding Hand.” It comes with a Anders Malmberg-directed video, and it follows their 2020 single “Lockdown Blues.” Iceage’s languorous, beatific rock frequently embodies the pain that arises when things are just out of reach, and “The Holding Hand” is filled with a similar anguish. Throughout the song, Elias Bender Rønnenfelt sings in a near-stupor, as if his emotions are overwhelming to the point of incapacitation, about feeling powerless in a harsh scene of mythological proportions. The over-five-minute track is cloaked in a shadowy echo, slightly unsettling wind chimes and, for added drama, slowly pounding guitars and strings that match the gravitas of this tale.

“The song lives in a slurred world, movements are elastically stretched out and strength is found in weakness while you find it hard to tell the difference between fume and matter,” Rønnenfelt says. “Gently the swaying intensifies, feel it escalate. Reach out for the holding hand, it seems almost within scope now.”

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May be an image of 1 person, guitar and text that says 'NEW SINGLE HOW FEEL' OUT 15.01 RAMA LAMA'

Kindsight is a new act from the Copenhagen indie scene and the first act outside of Sweden to sign with Rama Lama Records (Melby, Chez Ali, Steve Buscemi’s Dreamy Eyes etc.). Last fall, the young quartet released their two very promising debut tracks ‘Who Are You’ and ‘ Terminal Daze’. Two warm, nostalgic and atmospheric indie pop songs that got them praise such as “your new favourite band”. Now, the slow-burner ‘How I Feel’ follows and expands the sound of this promising act.

Kindsight are Nina, Søren, Anders and Johannes and formed out of Nina and Sørens shared love for The Sugarcubes. According to the band, the two of them then recruited drummer Johannes to “drag him out of an unsettling obsession with jazz-music” and bass player Anders was chosen “only because of his looks and his ability to fit into small bags.”.

The quartet makes retro-tinged indie pop that is instantly appealing and addictive. Nina’s vocals crowns the atmospheric soundscape perfectly and makes Kindsight something that’s been missing in Scandinavia for a long time.

Kindsight on ‘How I Feel’: Nina was once gripped by an overwhelming need to tell the world how she felt. Everyone agreed that it seemed like a fair deal, as she is the lead-singer. A longing ballad with a hazy view was built to heed her demand. But as it turns out, Nina hasn’t got a clue how she feels.

How I Feel is out now on all platforms via Rama Lama Records

Released January 15th, 2021

This Friday is in need of some instantly cheering retro indie pop from Copenhagen’s Kindsight. “Who Are You” is out today on Rama Lama Records, and it’s a warm hug between The Darling Buds and Dream Wife. Kindsight is a new Copenhagen based band and the first act outside of Sweden to sign with Rama Lama Records (Melby, Chez Ali, Steve Buscemi’s Dreamy Eyes etc.). The young quartet are set to release their debut single “Who Are You” – a warm, nostalgic and atmospheric indie pop song – on August 28th via the Stockholm based label.

The Danish quartet makes retro-tinged indie pop that is instantly appealing and addictive. Nina’s vocals crowns the atmospheric soundscape perfectly and makes Kindsight something that’s been missing in Scandinavia for a long time. Debut single Who Are You is the first taste of their melancholic beauty which we will hear a lot more of the upcoming year as the band are ready to finally share their music.  “Who Are You” is a summer song written in January – lush, light and forward-driven.

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Kindsight are Nina, Søren, Anders and Johannes, and formed out of Nina and Sørens shared love for The Sugarcubes. The band claim that drummer Johannes was recruited to “drag him out of an unsettling obsession with jazz-music” and bass player Anders was chosen “only because of his looks and his ability to fit into small bags.” We are feeling warm things for this band and would like to hear more please!

For the first time ever on vinyl, a special limited edition of Galaxie 500’s only live recording, “Copenhagen” . Galaxie 500’s last show of their last European tour was captured to 24-track tape by Danish National Radio on December 1st, 1990, and first released (on CD only) by Rykodisc in 1997, following the success of their 1996 box set reissue of all Galaxie 500’s studio albums.

3-sided double LP (side 4 is custom etching). Limited edition of 2000 black vinyl copies. For the first time ever on vinyl, a special limited edition of Galaxie 500’s only live recording, Copenhagen. Galaxie 500’s last show of their last European tour was captured to 24-track tape by Danish National Radio on December 1st, 1990, and first released (on CD only) by Rykodisc in 1997, following the success of their 1996 box set reissue of all Galaxie 500’s studio albums.

The live album, Copenhagen, which is heavy on songs from This Is Our Music and in almost every case improves upon them, turns out to be the ideal closing chapter. During the 1990 show in Denmark, Galaxie 500 play magnificently to what sounds like a pretty small crowd. But that small crowd is into it. Sometimes bands work like that. They never made it big, but during their short run, Galaxie 500’s often quiet and always beautifully rendered music had a profound impact on a few people, including this writer. It needs to stay out there, where it has a chance of finding a few more.

Copenhagen “is a bullet to the head of those who maintain that the band was best heard on record,” as critic/sage Byron Coley has written.”It is abundantly clear, as the trio spirals through an inspired set of covers and originals, that the introverted disengagement of their early live work has been replaced by a unique, powerful and controlled presence that allows them to deliver the goods emotionally as well as sonically. The blend of heart and hand is stunning.” Mark Richardson wrote in Pitchfork: “The live album, Copenhagen, which is heavy on songs from This Is Our Music and in almost every case improves upon them, turns out to be the ideal closing chapter.

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An official Record Store Day release, co-sponsored by Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales, who are releasing a limited edition Danish-style beer to enjoy alongside, and staging a RSD 2020 live tribute to Galaxie 500 at Brooklyn’s Rough Trade Records featuring Magnetic Fields, Xiu Xiu, Surfer Blood and others.

Recorded live by Danish National Radio, 1990, This 3-sided double LP (side 4 is custom etching) Limited edition of 2000 black vinyl copies.

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A few months ago Adam from “songsfortheday”, discovered a voice we immediately knew we would never forget. It’s rare to hit play on a track and instantly everything else around you fades away. Such is the case with the completely hypnotic and memorizing presence that Talitha Ferri presents.

Now more than ever, the world is looking for ways to escape, even just momentarily into a different headspace or mood. With each new track that is released, Ferri easily enthralls the listener in an immersive experience of unmatched beauty brushed with love, loss and pain. Even more remarkable than her powerful yet delicate vocals are the transparent and revealing nature of her lyrics, which revolve around her own struggles with mental health issues. Ferri’s third single, “Porcelain”.

The Copenhagen-based singer-songwriter uses subtlety to evoke powerful emotions. With just her acoustic harmonies, a simple guitar, and a captivating violin, “Porcelain” personifies brittle beauty. The song follows Ferri spiraling in and out of depression, and she explains the strange reality of the guilt associated with feeling bad, yet everything around her is so good.

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I’m conscious that right now we need something that brightens things a little, that can be reflective but see some optimism in the world situation. Talitha Ferri seems to hit that balance pretty well with her new song ‘The Sadness Lasts Forever’, the 2nd song released in the lead up to her album which is due out in May. Talitha previously, a Danish / American songwriter based in Copenhagen, who released her track ‘Home’ through the ‘Soulpod Collective’ last month. ‘Home’ was an impressive opener, but ‘The Sadness Lasts Forever’ soars to another level, courtesy of those vocals, which have such assured purity and confidence, that I promise you will believe everything she says.  ”You’ll be alright, despite the pouring rain” she tells us at the start, and that’s kind of good to know.

Instrumentally the song uses stripped back support, with just acoustic guitar and a violin, which both creep in and then build with the song, with the violin matching the vocals for their contrasting mix of melancholy and upbeat musical phrasing. The lengthy instrumental section is nice enough, and although it loses my attention slightly just before it returns to the main musical theme, overall I like the balance of Talitha Ferri’s songwriting and musical arrangements.

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Talitha Ferri is joined by Joseph Ricci on lead guitar, Janus Jakobsen on bass, and Jamie Metcalfe on violin. Her debut album, Get Well Soon, will be released May 1st, 2020.

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The Cure bring their melancholic, majestic melodies back to Roskilde Festival Black clothing, sooty eyeliner, blood-smear lipstick and a cobwebbed forest of hair have always made Robert Smith a stand-out front figure. And once you have heard him and the rest of The Cure give sound to their sometimes mournful, sometimes ecstatic, always dead-on-catchy songs, you find a true signature there as well.

Robert Smith and co. have been around in various line-ups for 40+ years now, and they have a hit-after-hit catalogue of songs for a massive live show.  Today, The Cure have sold about 30 million records worldwide, and they have released no less than three best-of compilations. This says a lot about the popularity surrounding a band that started playing post-punk in the London suburb of Crawley before moving onwards to an infectious mix of haunting melancholy and off-kilter pop. Through the years they have produced more than 30 critical singles, including ear worms like “The Lovecats”, “Close To Me”, “Just Like Heaven”, “Lullaby” and “Friday I’m in Love”. Among their 13 studio albums they have created dark masterpieces that remain on various ‘best ever’ lists, including Pornography, Disintegration and Bloodflowers.

The Cure has always put on marvellous shows that resonate with thousands of Roskilde-goers. And once they start playing they don’t stop anytime soon. Their setlists are always immense.

Seeing the Cure live is much more than a celebration of their legacy. You sense that you’re witnessing that rare feat of a decades-old band perhaps entering their prime rather than their twilight years. On their 1982 track “Pornography” Robert Smith sings: “I must fight this sickness, find a cure”. A vivid image on how The Cure’s music is soul-cleansing, cathartic stuff.

Setlist:

00:00:00 – Intro 00:01:40 – Shake Dog Shake 00:06:20 – From the Edge of the Deep Green Sea 00:14:20 – Just One Kiss 00:18:40 – Lovesong 00:22:26 – Last Dance 00:27:31 – Pictures of You 00:35:04 – High 00:38:44 – A Night Like This 00:43:04 – Burn 00:49:29 – Fascination Street 00:54:29 – Never Enough 00:57:34 – Push 01:02:16 – Inbetween Days 01:05:13 – Just Like Heaven 01:09:12 – Play for Today 01:13:16 – A Forest 01:21:26 – Primary 01:25:35 – Want 01:30:47 – 39 01:38:09 – One Hundred Years [encore] 01:50:12 – Lullaby 01:55:03 – The Caterpillar 01:58:59 – The Walk 02:02:32 – Friday I’m in Love 02:06:27 – Close to Me 02:10:00 – Why Can’t I Be You? 02:13:49 – Boys Don’t Cry

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Galaxie 500 were a really well-regarded indie rock band at the time. They signed to a big indie label, they got to tour a lot, to record extensively with the single producer on Earth they were most suited to work with, and they were absolutely adored all over in Europe. Galaxie 500 made three great records that people bought thousands of copies of, Galaxie 500 have later emerged as one of the pivotal underground groups of the post-punk era, dreamy and enigmatic, their minimalist dirges presaged the rise of both the shoegaze and slowcore movements of the 1990s. The group formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1986 and comprised vocalist/guitarist Dean Wareham (a transplanted New Zealand native), and bassist Naomi Yang and drummer Damon Krukowski, longtime friends who first met in high school in New York City before all three attended Harvard. Wareham and Krukowski initially teamed in the short-lived Speedy & the Castanets, which split after their bass player experienced a religious conversion; upon re-forming, the duo recruited Yang to play bass, although she had no prior musical experience.

Named after a friend’s car, Galaxie 500 began performing live throughout Boston and New York before recording a three-song demo tape which they sent to Shimmy Disc head honcho Kramer, who agreed to become the trio’s producer. After bowing in early 1988 with the singles “Tugboat” and “Oblivious” (the latter track featured on a flexi-disc included in an issue of Chemical Imbalance magazine)

Today

They issued their full-length debut, “Today” in 1988, which highlighted the group’s distinct, evolving sound pitting Wareham’s eerie, plaintive tenor, elliptical songs, and slow-motion guitar textures against Yang’s warm, fluid basslines and Krukowski’s lean drumming.

Damon Krukowski: said ,We had been listening to a Half Japanese record produced at Noise [Music to Strip By]– it sounded very spacious. All the other Boston bands were turning out a very heavy, dense sound. We were looking for something else. We weren’t a heavy band after all. We called to ask the rates– they were cheap! So we booked time. That’s how we came to record the “Tugboat” single at [his studio] Noise, and how we met Kramer. It turned out he was the only employee.

Galaxie 500’s debut doesn’t merely live up to the sweet promise of the band’s debut single “Tugboat,” Today’s final song, but almost without trying becomes its own gently powerful touchstone. While the influences are clear — third album Velvet Underground, early non-dance New Order, psychedelic haze and fuzz thanks to the reverb Kramer piled on as producer. By never feeling the need to conventionally rock out, the Krukowski/Yang rhythm section comes up with its own brand of intensity. Sometimes the two are persistently skipping along without Krukowski having to bash the hell out of the drums (the downright delightful “Oblivious” is a good example), other times they simply play it soft and slow. Meanwhile, Wareham’s low-key chiming and slightly lost, forlorn singing, at places wry and whimsical, often achingly sad, forms the perfect counterpoint to the songs’ paces, feeling like a gauzy dream. When he comes up with his own brand of electric guitar heroics, it’s very much in the Lou Reed and such descendants vein of less being more, setting the moods via strumming and understated but strong soloing. One particular Descendant gets honored with a cover version: Jonathan Richman, whose “Don’t Let Our Youth Go to Waste” is turned into a deceptively calm epic, with marvelous playing by all three members.

Dean’s smallish high voice, subtle accent, and laconic guitar were seated by Damon’s spacious sound– long cymbal splashes, bottom heads on his sparkly Gretsch kit– and Naomi’s unique, wide toned high on the neck melodies made a big, wide, slowly moving cloud.

It’s easier to lose oneself in the flow of the sound rather than worry about any deep meaning, making the stronger images that come to the fore all that more entertaining, like “watching all the people fall to pieces” in “Parking Lot.” “Tugboat” itself, meanwhile, remains as wonderful as ever, a cascading confession of love at the expense of everything else, somehow mournful and triumphant all at once.

On Fire

After signing to the U.S. branch of Rough TradeGalaxie 500 issued its defining moment, 1989’s evocative “On Fire”, a remarkably assured and rich record including the superb singles “Blue Thunder” and “When Will You Come Home.” Having already made a fine account of themselves on “Today”, the three members of Galaxie 500 got even better with “On Fire”, recording another lovely classic of late ’80s rock. As with all the band’s work, Kramer once again handles the production, the perfect person to bring out Galaxie 500’s particular approach. The combination of his continued use of reverb and the sudden, dramatic shifts in the music — never exploding, just delivering enough of a change — makes for fine results.

We were signed to Rough Trade by Robin Hurley, who ran the American label, and Geoff Travis, who was our A&R man and the head of the company back in England– both great people. It’s kind of amazing the list of things he has been involved with: Swell Maps, Jonathan Richman, Shockabilly, the Smiths, the Jesus and Mary Chain, Pulp, the Strokes.

Consider “Snowstorm,” with Krukowski’s soft-then-strong drums and Wareham’s liquid solo and how they’re placed in the mix, leading without dominating. Yang’s vocals became more prominent and her bass work more quietly narcotic than before, while Krukowski adds more heft to his playing without running roughshod over everything, even at the band’s loudest. Wareham in contrast more or less continues along, his glazed, haunting voice simply a joy to hear, while adding subtle touches in the arrangements — acoustic guitar is often prominent — to contrast his beautifully frazzled soloing. Lead off track “Blue Thunder” is the most well-known song and deservedly so, another instance of the trio’s ability to combine subtle uplift with blissed-out melancholia, building to an inspiring ending. There’s more overt variety throughout “On Fire”, from the more direct loner-in-the-crowd sentiments and musical punch of “Strange” to the Yang-sung “Another Day,” a chance for her to shine individually before Wareham joins in at the end. Again, a cover makes a nod to past inspirations, with George Harrison being the songwriter of choice; his “Isn’t It a Pity” closes out the album wonderfully, Kramer adding vocals and “cheap organ.” Inspired guest appearance  Ralph Carney, Tom Waits‘ horn player of choice, adding some great tenor sax to the increasing volume and drive of “Decomposing Trees.” CD pressings included the bonus tracks from the Blue Thunder EP.

After a limited-edition 7″ release featuring live renditions of the Beatles’ “Rain” and Jonathan Richman’s “Don’t Let Our Youth Go to Waste”.

The group returned in 1990 with This Is Our Music, a diffuse collection spotlighting the wry, sunny single “Fourth of July” and a haunting cover of Yoko Ono’s “Listen, The Snow Is Falling” .

What turned out to be the final Galaxie 500 album was also arguably the band’s most accomplished. Not that the earlier records lacked either charm or ability, but right from the charging, chugging start of “Fourth of July,” the amazing single and lead off song from This Is Our Music (even including a cheeky Velvet Underground reference from “Candy Says”), the trio here sounds like they could take on anyone. Kramer’s production and the use of reverb from past releases all once again contribute to Galaxie 500’s magic, while the individual members continue to sound fantastic. Somehow, though, everyone aims higher, Wareham’s singing among his finest and his guitar going for the truly epic more than once, Krukowski and Yang even more perfectly in sync than before, often being very bold without losing their intrinsic warmth.

From a generally different approach, Galaxie 500 here easily equaled the heights of their U.K. shoegaze contemporaries and often trumped them — “Summertime” in particular is a stunner , while making a lot of contemporary American indie rock seem fairly dull and workaday. The choice of cover version this time out is astonishing Yoko Ono’s “Listen, the Snow Is Falling,” with Yang singing beautifully over, initially, Wareham’s echoed guitar strums, and Krukowski’s barely-there percussion cascade. The switch to a full-band arrangement, far from destroying the song’s spell, makes it even more intense and gripping a listen.

The subtle touches throughout the album add immeasurably to its magic — the soft ringing bells shimmering through “Hearing Voices” quiet synth on “Spook,” and Kramer’s self-described “cheap flute” on “Way up High.” It all concludes with “King of Spain, Part Two,” a reworking of the flip side to “Tugboat” while it wasn’t a planned finale, as an unexpectedly right bookend to a career, it ends both Galaxie 500 and This Is Our Music on a perfect note.

Later CD versions include a cover of the Velvet Underground’s “Here She Comes Now,” originally the B-side from “Fourth of July.”.

Galaxie 500 recorded two sessions for John Peel’s BBC Radio 1 programme, these later released on the Peel Sessions album. Their cover of Jonathan Richman’s “Don’t Let Our Youth Go To Waste” was also voted into number 41 in 1989’s Top Festive 50 by listeners to the show. Dean Wareham: The first Peel Session we did was engineered by Dale “Buffin” Griffin, formerly the drummer in Mott the Hoople. I remember him being impatient. We were amazed at how big the studio was, and this computer they had that could mark the different sections of the song and take the tape machine right to them. My favorite Peel Session recording was our cover of the Sex Pistols’ “Submission”. People always say that’s an unlikely cover but Damon and I had been playing that one since our days in Speedy and the Castanets; it was one of the first songs we learned together.

Following a subsequent tour, Galaxie 500 disbanded after Wareham phoned Yang and Krukowski to say he was quitting the group.

A few months later, after Dean Wareham formed his new band, Luna, Rough Trade went bankrupt, and with the label’s demise went the trio’s three albums, as well as their royalties. In 1991, at an auction of Rough Trade’s assets, Krukowski purchased the master tapes for the group’s music, and five years later the Rykodisc label issued a box set containing Galaxie 500’s complete recorded output. A previously unreleased 1990 live set, dubbed Copenhagen, followed in 1997.

Copenhagen

A presumably final punctuation mark on Galaxie 500’s work, “Copenhagen”, released in 1997, is actually a recording from the last date of the band’s late 1990 European tour, captured for radio broadcast in the Danish capital in front of a vocally appreciative crowd. One main reason to listen in is hearing how the band’s studio approach clearly differed from the concert arena — while Kramer handles the live sound, the cocooning web of reverb familiar from the records isn’t present here. As a result, the performances have a more direct approach, Wareham’s voice a little more naked, his thoughts on emotional connection, and the oddities of life easier to capture. Yang’s bass gains in prominence as well, almost more so than Wareham’s guitar at points, while Krukowski as always keeps the beat well, adding subtle flourishes and touches as he goes. All this would be mere technical notation if the performance itself wasn’t worthy, though, and that it is. Touring for “This Is Our Music” as the trio was, the set list is mostly focused on that, though a fine version of “Decomposing Trees” starts things off. Three of the band’s favored covers close the set — Yoko Ono’s “Listen, the Snow Is Falling,” the Velvet Underground’s “Here She Comes Now,” and a version of Jonathan Richman’s “Don’t Let Our Youth Go to Waste” that provides a great final kick. For all the excellence of the show, one can hear a little more than once in Wareham’s soloing what Yang and Krukowski later described as his tendency to play the big rock star toward the end of the band’s life. It’s not bad work, but the cracks were starting to show.

Riotous guitars, insistent beats, and captivating melodies: this is the essence of The Oceans. Formed in 2014 by Copenhagen multi-instrumentalists Dan Joe & Linus Valdemar, the duo sounds like their city feels – a pulsing, paradoxical sea of chaos, noise, and serenity.

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Band Members
Linus Valdemar,
Dan Joe

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Each new song Iceage have released ahead of Beyondless has revealed it’s an album to get excited for, but this one just might be the most intriguing of the bunch. Surrounded by haggard, chain-smoking rockers and arid, brooding slow-burners, “Take It All” instead conjures up the just-left-of-reality experiences of dream states. Iceage have never recorded a song so elusive yet so emotive.

“The Day the Music Dies” combines raunchy brass, frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s sassy lead vocals and driving keyboards into a theatrical, Rolling Stones-esque stomper with Rønnenfelt drowning in anxiety (“How can one kill an impulsion / When it’s still kicking and breathing”) and restlessness (“The future’s never starting / The present never ends”).

From the new album ‘Beyondless’ out May 4th on Matador Records.

Palace Winter are Copenhagen-based Australian Carl Coleman and Dane Caspar Hesselager.
Having played in bands separately for years, a mutual respect for each other’s styles encouraged them to start writing together. Carl coming from a song-writing background. Caspar, a producer and classically trained pianist. Both, however, appreciate a strong melody, which is evident throughout the atmospheric dark-pop they create.

Their debut single was released in 2015, followed by an EP and in the summer of 2016, their debut album, “Waiting for the World to Turn” arrived. All released via Copenhagen-based label Tambourhinoceros.
The support that followed was widespread. Number 1 on Hype Machine and overwhelming reviews from heavy hitters like The Guardian, NME and Line of Best Fit. Radio support came from Guy Garvey, Lauren Laverne and Tom Ravenscroft at BBC 6 Music, KCRW, KEXP, Norway’s P3 and Denmark’s P6.

The band have successfully brought their cinematic psych-pop to the stage. With an increasing number of sold out live shows under their belts, fans have not been left disappointed by their hypnotic and mind-blowing live sets.
Having already supported Noel Gallagher and played Guy Garvey’s Meltdown, Roskilde, Green Man, Sziget in Budapest, Latitude and Secret Garden Party, amongst many others, Palace Winter are well placed to blow the roof off 2018.

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Palace Winter are
Carl Coleman & Caspar Hesselager.
Live Team adds:
Jacob Haubjerg – Guitar
Jens Bach – Drums

“Empire” is taken from the album Nowadays, out on May 4, 2018