Posts Tagged ‘Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’

Iceage return today with “Shelter Song,” the latest single from their forthcoming album “Seek Shelter”. Following “Vendetta” and “The Holding Hand,” “Shelter Song” sounds fuller and brighter than anything Iceage have committed to tape yet. Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s instantly recognizable voice is joined by the Lisboa Gospel Collective, who add an anthemic swell: “Come lay here right beside me // They kick you when you’re up, they knock you when you’re down.” 

The video, directed by long time friend and collaborator Catherine Pattinama Coleman, offers a rare, intimate look into the band’s life in Copenhagen amongst family and friends.

Iceage asked me if I wanted to direct the video for ‘Shelter Song.’ As a childhood friend of theirs, it was important for me to showcase our friendship and the people we share everyday life with. So instead of making a video full of symbolism or a staged performance, I wanted to make a private and personal video close to our hearts. After a crazy year of COVID-19, the world in flames and structural racism peaking at such an extent, I wanted to create a meaningful piece, especially being a woman of colour and fully in my third trimester. In the midst of a pandemic it’s important to remember that those of us who are privileged enough to have a roof over our heads, food, security, love and care, is something of great value. Love is not something one should not take for granted.” – Catherine Pattinama Coleman

The Latest Single from the Band’s Forthcoming Record “Seek Shelter” Out May 7th Iceage -on Mexican Summer and Escho

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Copenhagen’s Iceage will make their Mexican Summer Records debut on May 7th with “Seek Shelter”, their fifth album and first since 2018’s Beyondless. The Danish rockers shared another preview of the album in the form of new single/video “Vendetta” a menacing, yet danceable blues-rock track that moves in a fashion somewhere between swaggering and stumbling. “This ain’t no place for a sightseer,” Rønnenfelt warns, his impressionistic lyrics conjuring hazy images of transaction, exploitation and retribution. He swears vengeance over swaying shakers and drums, rowdy guitars and a monolithic synth hum that swells as “Vendetta” crescendoes, with discordant horns only sending it deeper into its dark downward spiral.

Of the album as a whole, Rønnenfelt had this to say: “When we started, I think we were just lashing out, completely blindfolded with no idea as to why and how we were doing anything. For Seek Shelter, we had a definite vision of how we wanted the album to be carved out, yet still the end result came as a surprise in terms of where we sonically were able to push our boundaries.” 

A decade on from New Brigade, an instant punk record made by four Danish teenagers that came out of nowhere and inspired total devotion around the world, Iceage’s fifth album and label debut is a thrilling new chapter for the band. Produced by Sonic Boom (Pete Kember of Spacemen 3) and mixed by Shawn Everett (HaimThe War on Drugs), Iceage come with a new emotional palette ripe with psychedelic flourishes, romantic piano balladry, invocations of patron saints and even a gospel choir for a song or two. Seek Shelter is a striking new direction for a band at their most expressive and expansive, recorded in a dilapidated wood-paneled Lisbon radio studio with a steady rain dripping through the ceiling. Equipment was arranged around puddles and slowly-filling buckets, garden lamps lit up the high-ceilings and a special record was made.

Sonic Boom (aka Pete Kember) produced the album. It includes “The Holding Hand,” a new song the band shared at the start of the February. The band’s line up features Elias Bender Rønnenfelt, Jakob Tvilling Pless, Johan Surrballe Wieth, and Dan Kjær Nielsen. An additional guitarist, Casper Morilla Fernandez, also joined them to record Seek Shelter, which was mixed by Shawn Everett.

Of the new single, Rønnenfelt had this to say in a press release: “Crime is the undercurrent that runs through everything. If you don’t see it, you’re not looking. In its invincible politics, it is the glue that binds it all together. ‘Vendetta’ is an impartial dance along the illicit lines of infraction.”
 
Director Jonas Bang directed the “Vendetta” video, which features actor Zlatko Burić alongside the band. Bang had this to say: “We wanted it to be less 1:1 story and more short format collage-ish like if you flick through a chapter in a book reading a bit here and there.” 

The band’s previous album, Beyondless, came out in 2018 on Matador Records.

Iceage“Vendetta” from the album ‘Seek Shelter’ out May 7th on Mexican Summer Records, their first for the label.

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Ten years on from their debut New Brigade, the Copenhagen band is sharing new song “The Holding Hand” today. Lead singer and lyricist Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s voice crawls over slow-marching percussion, and as scorching guitar and Nils Gröndahl’s piercing violin layer in, the song rises to a noisy peak.

Danish punk outfit Iceage have signed to Mexican Summer and shared their first single for the label, “The Holding Hand.” It comes with a Anders Malmberg-directed video, and it follows their 2020 single “Lockdown Blues.” Iceage’s languorous, beatific rock frequently embodies the pain that arises when things are just out of reach, and “The Holding Hand” is filled with a similar anguish. Throughout the song, Elias Bender Rønnenfelt sings in a near-stupor, as if his emotions are overwhelming to the point of incapacitation, about feeling powerless in a harsh scene of mythological proportions. The over-five-minute track is cloaked in a shadowy echo, slightly unsettling wind chimes and, for added drama, slowly pounding guitars and strings that match the gravitas of this tale.

“The song lives in a slurred world, movements are elastically stretched out and strength is found in weakness while you find it hard to tell the difference between fume and matter,” Rønnenfelt says. “Gently the swaying intensifies, feel it escalate. Reach out for the holding hand, it seems almost within scope now.”

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Beyondless

Ever since their first LP, New Brigade, appeared at the beginning of this decade, the Danish quartet Iceage have been buzzed about in particular punk and indie circles.

We’ve heard four stellar singles from Iceage’s fourth studio album, “Beyondless”: “The Day the Music Dies,” “Pain Killer” featuring Sky Ferreira, “Take It All” and “Catch It.” “The Day the Music Dies” combines raunchy brass, frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s sassy lead vocals and driving keyboards into a theatrical, Rolling Stones-esque stomper with Rønnenfelt drowning in anxiety (“How can one kill an impulsion / When it’s still kicking and breathing”) and restlessness (“The future’s never starting / The present never ends”).

From the new album ‘Beyondless’ out May 4th on Matador Records

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Iceage are a four-piece band from Copenhagen, Denmark signed to Matador Records that make punk-rock of a darker tone than most. ‘Catch It’ is the band’s first release in four years which features a poetic lyrical delivery from lead singer Elias Bender Rønnenfelt in his typical dingy fashion, chopped up with a contrasting guitar solo for added reflection.

On “Catch It,” he delivers one of his most emotive vocal performances yet. Over a simple, lurching chord progression, he groans and seethes into the mic, telling his story as with the wrinkles in his voice as with his words. Because there are only a few notes in the new single’s vocal melody, Rønnenfelt has more of a chance to modulate the texture of his voice. Rønnenfelt has the power to imbue even the simplest words with a distinctly dangerous aura: “You want it, you want it, you want it again/Why don’t you come and ask me?/I adore you, my friend,” he sings with what could be hint of malice. When “Catch It” slows to a false ending and then spins back up into a raucous, unhinged instrumental climax, it only makes his come-on sound like it could double as a threat.

Band Members
Dan Kjær Nielsen
Elias Bender Rønnenfelt
Johan Wieth
Jakob Tvilling Pless