Posts Tagged ‘Glasgow’

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Glasgow is a special place, and the bands it produces are often very special.  The Yummy Fur are no exception, if you haven’t listened to them before then do.  There’s lots of great 90’s indie on display here and Piggy Wings is an excellent greatest hits compilation.  Besides, if it’s good enough for John Peel, then it’s good enough for us.

Singer / guitarist, John McKeown, fronted the band from their 1992 inception (scores of cartoon melodies under a minute long delivered at high velocity) until their demise in 1999. Along the way they recorded three albums: Night Club (1996), Male Shadow at Three O’Clock (1998) and Sexy World (1999). Firm favourites of John Peel, they recorded two sessions for the much revered DJ and regularly featured on his show.

The Yummy Fur were a Glasgow based art-rock group who existed between 1992-99. Throughout their existence they were led by vocalist/guitarist John McKeown, with a host of collaborators and co-conspirators over the years.

Taken from Piggy Wings – the best of The Yummy Fur Out 18th October 2019 on Rock Action Records

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Glasgow-based songwriter Molly Linen is too release a pair of tracks that are set to feature on her debut EP, “Outside”, available from on Lost Map Records. Ahead of the release this week, Molly has shared the latest track lifted from the record, “When They Didn’t Care”.

Discussing the inspiration behind the track, Molly has suggested When They Didn’t Care is about, “worrying too much about what other people think, and the moment you realise that they don’t actually really care”. While the realisation that someone doesn’t care at all can be crushing, it can also be liberating, freeing you from trying too hard to impress, as Molly sings, “rows of everything you want to show, thinking always of what they can know”. Musically, it might be Molly’s most ambitious production to date, as the prominent bass melds into the steady rhythms of guitar and drums; it’s a track with as much in common with Ultimate Painting or Amber Arcades as it does with the folky comparisons she’s received previously.

Further fire for the growing evidence that Molly’s debut EP might just be the year’s finest to date.

Molly Linen is a Shropshire-born, Glasgow-based songwriter and guitarist. Her beguiling voice is both emotive yet serene recalling the dulcet whispered tones of Cat Power, layered upon melodic guitar lines which draw influence from artist such as Devon Sproule and Nick Drake. Linen’s latest single ‘When They Didn’t Care’ touches on,  The single follows the release of Linen’s wonderfully received debut single ‘Away’ (May 2019), which was described as “remarkably mature, so beautifully focused, and so frightfully exciting” by influential blog For The Rabbits, with radio play from the likes of BBC 6Music (Gideon Coe) and BBC Radio Scotland (Vic Galloway and Roddy Hart). Whilst at Spotify the single was added to several high-profile playlists including NPR’s .

The Outside EP, from which both singles are taken, is a collection of accomplished, atmospheric and personal songs written in, and inspired by, Linen’s life in rural Shropshire and the West End of Glasgow where the EP was recorded. As Linen expands “Some of the songs on the Outside EP reflect on my personal experiences of being out in nature and feeling the many emotional benefits, whilst others are observations of being in particular environments and noticing small details.” The Outside EP was written by Molly Linen (guitar/vocals) and features Beth Chalmers (keyboard, harmonium and vocals), Liam Chapman (drums, synth and vocals) and Gemma Fleet (bass). It was recorded by Ronan Fay at Green Door Studios, Glasgow,

Outside EP is out today via Lost Map Records.

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Having already received support from Clash, BBC 6 Music’s Tom Robinson and M Magazine, Glaswegian five-piece Acrylic return with another melodic indie anthem ‘Post Punk For The Abyss’ bursting with jangling guitars and well-crafted vocals.

When asked about the inspiration behind the track, Acrylic’s lead vocalist Andreas stated “Post Punk For The Abyss was born out of a playlist of post-punk revival songs made for me by a friend, Joe, who features on the cover artwork for the single. I was quite down at the time and he thought it would cheer me up. The lyrics reference various songs and artists from the playlist; Iceage, Ought, New Order. It’s an homage to them and a toast to feeling good again”.

Band Members
Andreas , Ross, Ruairidh, Lewis, Jack
released June 14th, 2019

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Scottish Fiction are proud to present tonic youth, the brand new single from Glasgow four-piece Wojtek the Bear. “Tonic Youth” is the first of four singles being released by Wojtek the Bear during 2019, which will be collected on a limited edition 10” vinyl, old names for new shapes, in the autumn.

Coming straight off the back of their well received debut album, a talent for being unreasonable, Glasgow’s Wojtek the Bear have wasted no time in getting back into the studio to furnish us with fresh music for 2019. Recording in the legendary Chem 19 with producer Jamie Savage [The Twilight Sad, Miaoux Miaoux, The Phantom Band, RM Hubbert], the band, with chiming melodies, pulsing bassline and swirling guitars, aim for that musical sweet spot between Camera Obscura’s Lloyd I’m Ready To Be Heartbroken and Real Estate’s It’s Real.

Of the track, lead singer Tam Killean reveals; “When I first moved into Glasgow in my early 20’s I quickly encountered people at parties I’d never been exposed to before; kids who’d never worked a day in their life, spent their summers in Val-d’Isére or Biarritz and all seemed to have fucking ponies. This song is about how initially on coming into contact with them I had a bit of a crisis of confidence, thinking that I’d wasted my life by just getting absolutely smashed from the age of 15 onwards.”

released May 3rd, 2019

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After the success of 2017’s There Are No Saints, things just seem to keep getting more and more exciting for this Scottish songwriter, Siobhan Wilson. Siobhan was recently granted a PRS Momentum Music Fund grant, had her song featured on prime time television, and appeared in session on BBC Scotland. All of which might just seem like a sideshow to the upcoming moment of excitement that will be the May release of her upcoming album, “The Departure”.

Ahead of The Departure’s release, Siobhan has this week shared her, “defiant hymn to female empowerment”, April. The track, perhaps unsurprisingly from the title, focuses on the idea of re-birth, and regeneration, and how that gives us all a chance to decide who we want to be; tough, beautiful, even both, as Siobhan sings, “be a mountain if you want…or a mountain flower”. Of the track, Siobhan suggests, “It’s my way of trying to send a direct message out to do whatever the hell you want with your body, your time, and make your own decisions about your life.” Some of the possibilities Siobhan points out seem quite generic, ideas that could be aimed at anyone and everyone, however others feel deeply personal, there’s a certain sense of the pressure women are under to be mothers, and her own desires, to be loud, to fear failure and to embrace success, “you make your own rules, you break the ones you choose”. Siobhan Wilson is walking her own musical path, and sounding this exciting that’s exactly how it should be.

The Departure is out May 10th via Suffering Fools Records.

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Shady Cow is proud to present this very special band on their ‘Run Around The Sun’ album tour. The band are super proud to announce that their second record “Run Around The Sun” will be out May 31st on Rock Action Recordsand Merge Records. Even more excited to release the new song ‘The Conversation’ into the world! Watch the video here.

The band are to play Rough Trade Records on Saturday 8TH June, promoted by Fan Club Records. Pre-order an Album/ Ticket and collect your copy on the day of this live show for FREE ENTRY.

Sacred Paws have a natural inclination not to take things too seriously. You can hear it all the way through a conversation with its two members, guitarist Rachel Aggs and drummer Eilidh Rodgers, punctuated by rolls of giggles and thoughtful pauses, and you can hear it in the light touch they bring to their music, a jangly blend of indie-pop full of fizzing world rhythms and bright horns.”

Taken from the new album Run Around The Sun out 31st May 2019 via Rock Action Records and Merge Records.

Fan Club’s focus is to promote women-identifying and non-binary artists, designers, musicians and creatives, whilst hanging out and making friends in a safe space, whilst dancing and drinking to a genre-clashing soundtrack of women and non-binary musicians.

They will be selling their ‘zines and other fabulous wares on the night!

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The Vaselines formed in Glasgow, Scotland in 1986. Following the release of two EPs, Son of a Gun and Dying for It, and the first and only full-length album, Dum-Dum, in 1989, the band split up. Kurt Cobain of Nirvana was a big fan of the band, and covered three of their songs: “Molly’s Lips”, “Son of a Gun” and “Jesus Wants Me for a Sunbeam”. He also named his daughter after McKee.

Following a post-Vaselines break, she began making music with Vaselines bass player James Seenan, writing material of a more-mellow flavour. These songs were released under the name Suckle, initially coming out on 4AD Records offshoot Detox Artefacts. This coincided with a John Peel session.

Against Nurture, the only Suckle long player, was released in 2000 on Chemikal Underground.

On 10th April 2006, Frances McKee released her first solo album, “Sunny Moon”.

In the summer of 2006, Frances McKee and Eugene Kelly took to the stage together for the first time since 1990, to perform a set of The Vaselines songs, as part of a joint tour to promote their individual solo albums. This led to The Vaselines reforming on 24 April 2008 for a charity show for the Malawi Orphan Support group at Glasgow’s MONO venue.

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Since 2008, The Vaselines have continued to perform around the world, with members of Belle & Sebastian supporting their live set. On 5th May 2009, Sub Pop released Enter the Vaselines. A deluxe-edition reissue of the 1992 Sub Pop release, it includes remastered versions of the band’s two EPs, album, as well as demos and live recordings from 1986 and 1988.

The Vaseline’s most recent album, V for Vaselines, was self-released in 2014 on the band’s own label, Rosary Music, in order to maintain creative control.

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Glasgow’s Acrylic prepare to kick start 2019 with the release of their infectious new single ‘I’ve Got Too Many Friends’, which came out 11th January 2019.

The single is a soaring slice of indie rock from the offset, filled with jangling hooks, sweeping guitars and effortless harmonies throughout. Frontman Andreas Chrsitodoulidis’ rich, baritone vocal feels instantly reminiscent of the likes of The National’s Matthew Berninger, giving the track an undeniably defiant and endearing sound. Talking about the single, Andreas elaborates “’I’ve Got Too Many Friends’ is about feeling as though you’ve found yourself in an ideal situation, with all the pieces falling together, and knowing that you’re still going to mess it up. It’s about a rift developing in a relationship and explores the naive idea that sex will resolve your issues, even though it will, in fact, be a colourless and sad affair and will most likely send you straight to the abyss.

released January 11, 2019
All lyrics and music by Acrylic

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Formed back in 2014 following the demise of their previous band Golden Grrrls, Sacred Paws are a band who are steadily making impressive waves. Their 2017 debut album, Strike A Match, saw the duo bag the prestigious Scottish Album Of The Year prize, tour across Europe and receive near universal critical acclaim. They made the probably sensible decision not to rush a follow-up out into the world, and thankfully the wait seems to be drawing towards a close with the release this week of a brand new track, “Brush Your Hair”.

In many ways, “Brush Your Hair” picks up where the band left-off, the intricate guitar work, perfect vocal harmonies and infectious rhythms remain; equal part punkish energy, artsy experimentation and perhaps most crucially, a lot of fun. It’s near impossible not to have a good time listening to Sacred Paws, we find our feet involuntarily twitching with the snare drum, our knees shimmying in time to the rapid-fire guitar work. With the promise of more news to come soon, Sacred Paws could just be the sound of 2019.

Brush Your Hair is out now via Rock Action Records.

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Aztec Camera  a Scottish Indie/pop/new wave band was formed by Roddy Frame, the group’s singer, songwriter, and only consistent member. Formed in 1980, Aztec Camera released a total of six albums: “High Land, Hard Rain” (1983), “Knife” (1984), “Love” (1987),“Stray” (1990), “Dreamland”(1993) and “Frestonia”(1995).The band garnered popular success for the songs “Oblivious”, “Somewhere in My Heart” and “Good Morning Britain” (a duet with former Clash guitarist Mick Jones).

The band’s first UK single release was sold in a 7″ vinyl format by Postcard Records a Glasgow-based independent record label co-founded by Edwyn Collins and Alan Horne—in 1981. The single featured the song “Just Like Gold” and a B-side entitled “We Could Send Letters”; an acoustic version of the latter song appeared on a collectable compilation album, entitled C81, that was released on cassette in 1981 through a partnership between NME magazine and Rough Trade Records. Frame, was just aged 16 years, He met Collins for the first time during the Postcard period when the latter was 21 years old.

A second single, also released in 1981, featured the songs “Mattress Of Wire” and “Lost Outside The Tunnel”. Following the two 7″ vinyl releases with Postcard, the group signed with Rough Trade Records in the UK and Sire Records in the United States for their debut album. At this point, the band was officially a quartet: Roddy Frame (vocals, guitar, harmonica), Bernie Clark (piano, organ), Campbell Owens (bass) and Dave Ruffy (drums, percussion).

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High Land, Hard Rain (1983)

When it appeared in the spring of 1983, Aztec Camera’s debut album, High Land, Hard Rain, was an acoustic-driven breath of fresh air. Led by teenaged singer/songwriter/guitarist Roddy Frame, the Scottish band offered a batch of memorable songs that deserved a broader audience than they reached at the time, from the infectious “Oblivious” and “Pillar to Post” to the introspective “The Bugle Sounds Again.” Frame went on to release another five Aztec Camera albums before recording under his own name.

Aztec Camera’s debut album, “High Land, Hard Rain” was produced by John Brand and Bernie Clarke for the Rough Trade record label. The album was released in April 1983 and was distributed in different formats on Domino Recording Co. The album was successful, garnering significant critical acclaim, Frame later revealed that the song “Oblivious” was consciously written as a Top of the Pops type pop song and received a corresponding degree of popularity.

During the recording process for the album, Frame used a different guitar for every song. For the song “Orchid Girl”, Frame explained in 2013—during the 30th anniversary tour that he was attempting to merge the influences of his favorite guitarist at the time,  jazz player Wes Montgomery, and punk rock icon Joe Strummer. In a late 1990s television interview, Frame explained that a “boy” image was associated with him during this era, and that he was annoyed by it at the time, as he was taking his music very seriously—”you don’t want to be called ‘boy’; especially when you’re listening to Joy Division” but he eventually stopped caring about it.

After “High Land Hard Rain”, Bernie Clarke left the band, and was replaced by Malcolm Ross on second guitar and backing vocals. Aztec Camera changed record labels once again for the release of their second album, “Knife”, which was released through Warner Music .

Frame revealed in a May 2014 BBC radio interview that he was not informed of the ownership arrangements of the record deal, stating that he was unaware as an 18-year-old that the record company would own the rights to all of his corresponding recordings.  After “High Land, Hard Rain”, Frame spent a significant amount of time living in New Orleans, listening to Bob Dylan’s album “Infidels”. Upon reading that Dire Straits’ guitarist and singer Mark Knopfler produced the album, Frame began writing songs based on a sound that he thought Knopfler could work with.

Knife (Expanded)

Knife (1984)

Frame signed the band to the WEA record label—at the time his manager was Rob Johnson  and he secured Knopfler as the producer for Aztec Camera’s second album,“Knife”, which was released in 1984; Frame explained in 1988 that Knopfler was very “professional” and efficient during the recording process. Frame’s experimental mindset in relation to music emerged on “Knife”, as the duration of the titular song is nearly nine minutes and synthesizers appear throughout the album. Prior to the album’s release, the band previewed a selection of songs as part of a performance for the BBC television show Rock Around The Clock and the song “All I Need is Everything” received radio airplay subsequent to release. In a 2007 interview alongside Collins, Frame explained further:
He’s [Knopfler] a great guitarist. recording techniques were great—you [Collins] would have liked him, ‘cos that was then, it was quite a thing. ‘Cos everyone was going digital, and going MIDI and all that, and his thing was all about using the right microphone. If you use the right microphone, then you don’t have to use too much EQ and all that stuff, and it was all about that. Yeah, I kinda liked that—the right mic[rophone], the right amp[lifier], the right kind of board and stuff.

Love“Love” (1987)

At the time that the band’s third album “Love”(1987) was created, Frame was the only original member of the band involved with the project; Love and future Aztec Camera albums were written and recorded by Frame under the “Aztec Camera” moniker, and session musicians recorded with Frame on a track-by-track basis.

Frame explained in August 2014 that he contemplated the conception of “Love” during a three-year hiatus following the release of “Knife”. Frame said that he moved even further away from the British “indie ethic” and was listening to the “pop end of hip hop”, Frame wanted to make a record based on such influences and “Working In A Goldmine” the first song to achieve this aspiration.

Frame relocated to the US to record the album—”pretty much against the wishes of Warner Brothers“, who were unsure of his decision-making at the time—and was primarily based in Boston, Massachusetts, and New York. Frame recorded with American session musicians, like Marcus Miller and David Franke, and explained that his audience was “mystified” by the transformation of the band, but he was “too far gone” to care and just wanted to do his “own thing” by that stage. Due to the significant change of musical direction, the album’s first three singles did not make a strong impression in the marketplace.

The “Love” album produced the popular song “Somewhere In My Heart”, recorded by Frame with dance, R&B and pop producer Michael Jonzun in Boston. Frame said in 2014 that the song has been “great” for him, but at the time of creating the album, the song was not “in keeping” with the rest of “Love”, Frame revealed in a radio interview with the “Soho Social” program, presented by Dan Gray, that he considered “Somewhere In My Heart” an odd song and initially thought it would be best as a B-side.

“Somewhere in My Heart” is the twelfth single and biggest hit by the Scottish band. It was released as the third single from their 1987 studio album “Love”.

Frame was asked during a television interview, following the release of “Love”, about the new sound of the album, and he referenced artists like Anita Baker and Luther Vandross. When asked if the album could be labelled “Middle of the road (MOR)”, Frame replied: “Call it what you like. I don’t really mind.”

Stray [Deluxe Edition]

Stray (1990)

For the band’s fourth album, “Stray”, Frame collaborated with the Clash’s Mick Jones on the song “Good Morning Britain”, He and Jones also toured with the band following the album’s release. Jones performed as Aztec Camera at the Glasgow Barrowlands and the Ibiza Festival in 1990.

In a 1990 interview, Frame explained that he wrote “Good Morning Britain” in 45 minutes after a two- to three-hour conversation with Jones in the canteen of a London rehearsal studio that both Big Audio Dynamite and Aztec Camera were using.  In an August 2014 radio interview, Frame elaborated further, stating that at the time he wrote the song, Jones lived near his London home; Frame had visited Jones after recording the song and said to the Clash guitarist, “You’ll either sing on it, or you’ll want to sue me”, as Frame believed the song was so similar to Jones’ previous work.

Dreamland

“Dreamland” (1993)

Frame then recorded the next Aztec Camera album,”Dreamland”, with Japanese composer Ryuichi Sakamoto. Released in 1993, While mixing the album at Hook End Manor, an 18th-century red-brick building that had been converted into a studio in the Berkshire countryside of England, UK, Frame explained that he waited for a lengthy period of time to work with Sakamoto, due to the latter’s busy schedule. Frame finally met with Sakamoto in Ibiza and both eventually recorded the album in New York City, US over a four-week period. Frame’s interest in Sakamoto was elaborated upon in a latter interview.
I liked what he did when he was in the Yellow Magic Orchestra, and I also liked that album where he plays the music from Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence on piano. That’s where you realise that the atmosphere around his compositions is actually in the writing. Frame’s routine consisted of: working in the studio from the early afternoon until around 2. a turkey sandwich at a deli off Times Square (“because it was possible to get one at two in the morning, and for no other reason”); a cab-ride back to the Mayflower Hotel, where he was staying; an hour of listening to Shabba Ranks; and then bed.

“Frestonia” (1995)

For Frame’s final album under the Aztec Camera moniker, and the last original studio recording for the WEA label, Frame worked with renowned production team Langer-Winstanley, who had previously worked with Madness and Elvis Costello. “Frestonia” was released in 1995 and the Reprise Records label issued it in the US. “Sun” (1996) was the only one song from the album that was released as a single. After the release of “Frestonia”, Frame finally decided to record under his own name in the future and was no longer a Warner artist.

There has been three Aztec Camera “Best of” compilations released: “The Best Of Aztec Camera” was released in 1999 by Warner ESP. that specialised in compilations; in 2005,Deep and Wide and Tall was released by the Warner Platinum series; and “Walk Out To Winter: The Best Of Aztec Camera” , a two-disc collection that was released by the Music Club Deluxe label in 2011.

Since the Stray Tour in 1990, Frame has merged a segment of the Bob Dylan song “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” into “Down The Dip”, from “High Land, Hard Rain”, and this version of the song was played by Frame at subsequent live shows, Around 2012, Frame included a segment of the Curtis Mayfield song “People Get Ready” in live solo versions of the song “How Men Are”, from the “Love” album. In October 2013, a book entitled The Lyrics: Roddy Frame containing the entirety of Frame’s lyrical work with Aztec Camera.