Posts Tagged ‘Domino Recordings’

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English five-piece Hookworms have followed up this year’s Microshift with a new remixes EP, Microshift Remixes EP, out on November. 23rd via Domino Recordings. The four-track EP features remixes from Nik Colk Void of Factory Floor, Luke Abbott, Free Love (fka Happy Meals) and XAM (with Hookworms’ own MB). The EP will be limited to 500 physical copies and they unveiled the first track from it this past week: “Ullswater (Luke Abbott Remix).” The new remix preserves the punchy, intricate electro-rock quality of the group’s album while drawing it out for a more hypnotic, rhythmic drone. The vocals cut out about halfway through, but they keep up the intrigue with mind-numbing synths and pulsing percussion, opening the sonic palette much wider than you thought they would, especially with the outro’s strange, waterfall-like percussive elements

Hookworms – “Ullswater (Luke Abbott Remix)”, taken from ‘Microshift Remixes EP‘ released 23rd November 2018 on Domino Recordings Co

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Revered indie singer-songwriter Chan Marshall a.k.a. Cat Power takes inspiration from well-traveled folk and blues musicians on Wanderer, her first album in six years (and tenth overall). The 11-track project will include the rumbling, soulful single “Woman” (featuring recent tourmate Lana Del Rey) as well as what Marshall promises are appearances from “longtime friends and compatriots.” In a statement announcing the LP, Marshall said, “Wanderer, the album, represents the course my life has taken in this journey  going from town to town, with my guitar, telling my tale; with reverence to the people who did this generations before me … They were all wanderers, and I am lucky to be among them.”

Chan Marshall is preparing to release her 10th album under the alias Cat Power. While she’s known for her inventive covers (her latest triumph a take on Rihanna’s “Stay”), Marshall has remained an independent and innovative songwriter since debuting in the ’90s, recently influenced by big changes: motherhood, a six-year musical hiatus and a new label, Domino Recordings (her former label, Matador Records, passed on Wanderer). Despite a somewhat winding road since her last record, 2012’s SunCat Power is poised to make a victorious return. If “Stay” and the record’s other two singles, “Woman” and the title track, are any indication, Wanderer is headed for husky pop glory.

Sonic and emotional economy tend to be Chan Marshall’s greatest strengths. Her albums as Cat Power sound like eavesdropping on intimate confessions bolstered by stark musical accompaniment. Even though Marshall has moved beyond guitar-and-voice compositions as her career has progressed—1996’s What Would The Community Think incorporated smoldering pedal steel; 1998’s Moon Pix featured contributions from members of the Dirty Three; and 2006’s The Greatest was brightened by horns—her overall aesthetic remains unvarnished sparseness.

One of two standout Washington D.C. post-punk records released this year, Flasher’s Constant Image is the group’s big-time debut LP; the tight group of friends found themselves a step beyond their DIY roots upon signing to Domino Recordings. They’ve taken full advantage of their access to studio resources here; Constant Image is a sly, smart, fun record that never sounds too slick or overproduced and really shows off the trio’s ability to wind dry, oblique observations about commercial culture around killer pop hooks. Standout tracks like “Pressure,” “Material,” and “Skim Milk” elegantly balance space and tension, elastic bass and minimal yet melodic guitar, and a rhythmic sense of urgency and discomfort with blase vocal delivery. There are clear ‘80s sonic referents here, but this is no indistinguishable pastiche too backwards-facing to sound contemporary; instead, Flasher’s deft work highlights that we’re still dealing with the legacies of the Reagan/Thatcher era in many, many ways.

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Flasher has such an 80’s goth post punk kinda style. remind me of The Lords of the New Church. quirky tempo changes and really cool vocal harmonies. great live. a must see.

Flasher-Constant-Image

All three members of Flasher, the great young indie rock band, are lifelong habitués of Washington DC and its environs. They know this landscape. They know Rock Creek Park and summer Fort Reno afternoons and those few spots in the infamous 9:30 Club balcony where you can sit down and still kind of see what’s happening onstage. They are current cogs in the DC machine, restaurant workers who haven’t been able to quit their day jobs even after becoming Arctic Monkeys’ labelmates. (All three of them have worked at Comet Ping Pong, the Northwest eatery where some of the most bizarre undercurrents of DC life recently collided in hallucinatory and violent ways.) If they stay in DC, maybe they’ll never quit their day jobs, no matter how successful their band becomes. They seem to know this. And Constant Image, their full-length debut, feels like an ode to the torpor and inertia of present-day young urban service-industry life. It is an album rife with fatalism, with blank-faced acceptance.

“Go,” the album’s buzzing headrush of an opening track, is all about snorting coke with coworkers after getting done with a long shift — or, at least, that’s what I hear in it. (Flasher’s lyrics are oblique enough that they could imply a lot of different things.) Other moments on the album are full of dazed, intense little epigraphs: “Laughter in this century is a misery afterglow,” “It’s not like I had a reason for leaving you / Thinking I could fix it if it wasn’t for Adderall,” “History, how’d you get so mean? / Who’d you beat?” These aren’t fleshed-out philosophies; they’re the bemused musings of people who have been forced, through economic circumstances, to spend their days working as friendliness machines, who have to work to hang onto their humanity whenever they’re not working to live. Seen from a certain perspective, Constant Image works as a symphony of numbness.

But when you actually listen to the thing, it bursts with life, with purpose. Singer and guitarist Taylor Mulitz used to play bass for Priests, but he’s not Flasher’s frontman. Instead, the band has no leader, and Mulitz and Daniel Saperstein divide up lead-vocal parts like they were splitting tips at the end of the night. Voices overlap, or weave throughout each other. Hooks burst in from every angle. Constant Image is a short album, but its melodies and ideas never stop flying. The songs don’t belong to any clear genre; they’re punk and post-punk and new wave and shoegaze and classic rock all at once. When you’re listening, it’s hard to think about genre dividing lines or societal collapse. Instead, those euphoric synth-smears and sun-dappled guitar lines fill up your entire consciousness and sweep you away.

Not that long ago, Flasher were a punk band — or, at least, a band that came from a cultural context that had something to do with punk. Institutions like Comet Ping Pong, and like the venues that the band came up playing, are the product of a city where people spent years fighting for inclusive all-ages spaces and unbound-by-scene free expression. And yet the band’s (excellent) 2016 debut EP was a raw, nervy post-punk record, a record with traceable antecedents. For Constant Image, though, they’ve pushed themselves away from the sounds that might’ve come naturally. Instead, they decamped for Brooklyn and went to work with producer Nicolas Vernhes, someone who’s put in work with bands like Animal Collective and the War On Drugs. And they’ve come away with all these beautiful sounds, these layered guitar-twinkles and synth-whirrs and bass throbs, their voices piling all over each other in some kind of communal ecstasy.

The songs on Constant Image are just great songs. They’re songs that would get heavy airplay on alt-rock radio in a better world, a world where alt-rock radio still exists in any appreciable way. It’s an album about hopelessness that, in its craft and its spirit, still radiates hope and joy and possibility. It’s one of those albums that feels like it alters my entire brain chemistry every time the next chorus hits, and that’s Constant Image.

I love how this DC band blend Hometown influences like Unrest and Holland with Three O’clock style paisley underground into a brilliant record that goes against the current grain. If this came out 25 years ago it would have been on Teenbeat fer sure!

Constant Image is out 8th June on Domino Recordings

Consolation EP

Detroit’s Protomartyr released yet another solid full-length in “Relatives In Descent”, just last year, but that doesn’t appear making the band interested in taking time off: The upcoming Consolation E.P. offers four new songs, and with a notable guest: Kelley Deal sings on two of them. Mike Montgomery, Deal’s R. Ring bandmate, recorded the EP, so enlisting the Breeders guitarist was an easy step. Her voice nicely counterbalances Joe Casey’s spoken-sung vocals, giving a little ray of lightness to Protomartyr’s frequently bleak, often discordant sound. So it’s settled: more Kelley Deal in everything.

Post-punks Protomartyr are following their acclaimed 2017 album Relatives In Descent with Consolation E.P., a new EP recorded in part with Kelley Deal of The Breeders and set for a June 15th release via Domino Recordings. Two of the EP’s four tracks feature Deal on vocals alongside Protomartyr lead singer Joe Casey, including the snarling track “Wheel of Fortune.”

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Check out the Ciaran Lyons-directed new video for ‘Static Resistance’, a track from the forthcoming new Hookworms album, ‘Microshift’, due out on February 2nd via Domino Recordings.

“‘Static Resistance’,” say the band, “is the oldest track on the album, we wrote and recorded the first version of it early 2015, not very long after ‘The Hum’ had been released. It’s one of only two pre-flood songs on the record. It’s a song about the wax and wane of depression and an eternal want to escape the life you’ve built.”

Live dates

FEBRUARY
23 LIVERPOOL Invisible Wind Factory
24 BRIGHTON Patterns
MARCH
04 BIRMINGHAM Hare & Hounds
09 MANCHESTER White Hotel
10 MANCHESTER White Hotel
18 NEWCASTLE Cluny
24 LONDON Electric Brixton
25 SHEFFIELD Picturehouse Social

Austra is a JUNO nominated electronic pop project from Toronto, created by Katie Stelmanis in 2009 and includes three other players. Future Politics is album number three. It offers a tighter, punchier sound than the previous two with addictive beats and instant likeability. Lyrically, the songs are smart in not offering specific political ideas in a world where a cacophony of entrenched opinions and opposing interests is flourishing fiercely, scattering humanity into different antagonistic camps. Universal themes are touched upon, for example that both exploitation and mendicancy are undeserving of praise.

Katie also re-introduces the subject of alienation by technology, certainly truer in today’s world with ubiquitous cell phone finger tapping. She does this, however, with a warmer presentation than grim visions presented by say Ultravox in “Dislocation”. As such, the album has more of a hopeful vision of the future and inspires us to be creative in conjuring up new and better systems of society than the worn-out models of today. And amidst the chaos and the hostile arguments, it reminds us too, via the cover, that you can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make it drink. Austra’s Future Politics offers a refreshing cleanse for wearied minds.

There’s a superb new EP / Mini-LP affair from Steve Mason of Beta Band fame, and Martin Duffy of Primal Scream, coming together as ‘Alien Stadium’. Brilliantly intuitive melodies and gritty blues sensibilities, pulled together with a respectable pool of complimentary talents.

A hybrid meeting of two musical voyagers working at maximum velocity for the betterment and detriment of all human kind. Join Steve Mason (The Beta Band) and Martin Duffy (Primal Scream) as they take you out of this world, into near Space and back to planet Earth again with their collaborative four track mini album, ‘Livin’ In Elizabethan Times’.

Tracklisting:
1. This One’s For The Humans
2. The Visitation
3. The Moon Is Not Your Friend
4. Titanic Dance (Lynch Mob Mix)

Rush released before imminent, full disclosure, this musical space ride from Alien Stadium is the sound of two enormous brains working in unrestricted full flow. This record is inevitable and is beautiful, frightening and enlightening. 30 minutes of music  Alien Stadium – This One’s For The Humans, taken from the mini album Livin’ In Elizabethan Times out December 1st 2017 on Double Six / Domino Recordings.

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Watch the new video from Patrick Watson for his brand new single ‘Broken’ which was recorded at studio PM in Montreal last month.

“This is a song I just felt like sharing before the next record. Dedicated to the storms we went through.” Patrick Watson Of the video, recently shot in Montreal, director Pedro Pires says: “It was a real pleasure to work with Patrick to create this video. We started with simple intuitive ideas such as characters fleeing or running away in fast moving vehicles. I then proposed to use reflections and flares to fragment the light to reveal a more impressionist moody state of mind of these various “broken” characters”.

Patrick Watson – Broken (Official Video) the new single.

Hookworms have announced their first new work in over three years after unveiling plans to release their new record Microshift in February via Domino Recordings. The Leeds band have given fans a teaser of their new album.

There’s plenty of synths at play on this lead track ‘Negative Space’, from the forthcoming new album announced by Hookworms today.  The album marks a seismic shift in their sound, dynamic, songwriting and production, whilst still bearing all the ferocious energy, intricate musicianship and bruised but beautiful song-craft of the previous releases which have quietly made them one of the UK’s most revered young bands.

This is the band’s third studio album technically but arguably the first in which the studio has been central to its creation. Pearl Mystic and second LP, The Hum were heavily informed by the band’s live sound, Microshift on the other hand came to life in the studio, formed out of loops, modular synthesizer sequences, drum machines, homemade samples etc. which were jammed around and layered until the songs began to emerge.

The record was written and recorded in full following a complete rebuild of the band’s Suburban Home Studio after the River Aire floods in Leeds in the winter of 2015 which devastated the studio.

‘Microshift’ is set to arrive on February 2nd 2018 through Domino Recordings, and you can hear its first cut streaming below. Hookworms will two solo shows before Christmas, followed by a UK tour early next year.