Posts Tagged ‘Trouble in Mind Records’

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It only takes a few seconds of their single “In / Out” to realize that En Attendant Ana have something special. “Shred” isn’t a word you’d normally associate with jangle pop, but it can definitely be used to describe the chiming, pummeling riff that’s sprinkled throughout the Parisian band’s single. Margaux Bouchaudon’s vocals evoke Stereolab’s Lætitia Sadier and Alvvays’ Molly Rankin—she was practically genetically engineered to sing perfect, hyper-melodic dream pop. It would be unfair to dub them a dream pop outfit—they tap into avant-pop, post-punk and college rock with similar ease.

With their second album Juillet, they subvert listeners’ perception of them on nearly every track. “From My Bruise to an Island” is a soothing, horn-led ambient piece, “Flesh or Blood” is incisive post-punk at its best and “Words” drops a warped synth interlude alongside wailing brass. They approach familiarly blissful indie-pop (“Do You Understand?”) with as much care as they do their more complex, off-kilter moments. It’s rare to find such thoughtfulness in a record so unabashedly tuneful.

Taken from the Paris, FR quintet’s sophomore album “Juillet”, out January 24th, 2020 via Trouble In Mind Records

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Nebraska songwriter David Nance returns to Trouble In Mind Records with his fifth (proper) studio album “Staunch Honey”, his follow-up to his acclaimed 2018 album “Peaced and Slightly Pulverized”. Returning to the home-recorded magic of his early albums, “Staunch Honey” was recorded entirely to tape by Nance himself at his Omaha home with the occasional assistance from his long time live bandmates Jim Schroeder & Kevin Donohue.

Guitar man David Nance continues his prodigious output of underground heartland rock with what might be his most accessible album yet. “Staunch Honey” sounds instantly timeless, but also as fresh and unique as any other rock album that came out this year. “My Love, The Dark and I” is probably the best union of Nance’s country-rock influences and his lo-fi aesthetic, without the confrontational squeal of his “Silver Wings” cover, but with just enough of a rough-hewn, homemade feel to please fans of Honey Radar or, well, Nance’s earlier, rougher records. Normally a White Light / White Heat kinda guy, “July Sunrise” and its loping guitar lines is more The Velvet Underground, but with Nance singing like Tony Joe White instead of Lou Reed. “Learn the Curve” is a slinky, bluesy vamp, while “If the Truth Shows Up” finishes the whole thing up with the stoned-out-of-its-mind psych chug of Endless Boogie. If you ever wanted to hear one of Dickey Betts’ almost saccharinely upbeat Allman Brothers songs turned into a smokey, hazy space journey, you’ll probably want to listen to “Gentle Traitor” which starts off with the colourful, chiming guitars of Betts songs like “Blue Sky” and “Jessica,” before drifting off into the cosmos. Nance has been keeping up the good fight for years now and with Staunch Honey, he might finally win over your rock ‘n’ roll uncle. 

Many of the tunes on “Staunch Honey” feel like classics, but that’s because in Nance’s hands – they are. Not content to let the album go by without the rumble of guitar, “If The Truth Ever Shows Up” closes out the album. It’s an instrumental jam with Nance wrangling and riffing on a gut-punching guitar solo for 6-plus minutes that feels very much like the end credits to a long-lost midnight movie.

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Online music marketplace Discogs has just launched the Discogs Daily Dig, an initiative to support indie record labels during the coronavirus pandemic. Each day they will focus on a different indie label that will sell rarities, test pressings, out-of-print releases, and back catalouge through Discogs. It started today (5/5) with Numero Group and here’s the first week’s schedule:

  • Tuesday, May 5 – Numero Group
  • Wednesday, May 6 – Captured Tracks
  • Thursday, May 7 – Burger Records
  • Friday, May 8 – Trouble In Mind
  • Saturday, May 9 – Stones Throw
  • Sunday, May 10 – Drag City
  • Monday, May 11 – Third Man Records

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Portland band Lithics are back with “Tower of Age”, their first record for Trouble In Mind which will be out June 5th. Excellent first single “Hands” stays tightly coiled for most of it’s existence, though it unleashes some serious noise when you least expect it. After introducing themselves to the world with 2016’s “Borrowed Floors” (Water Wing) and throwing down the gauntlet with 2018’s “Mating Surfaces” on Kill Rock Stars, Lithics make the jump to Trouble In Mind for “Tower of Age”.

“Tower of Age” bristles with invention, wedging lyrical Dadaism into right angles of rhythmic minimalism. This is music in ellipses. A circular communication and a fusion of decades worth of musical insight into a singular refraction of thought & sound. Guitars plunk and scratch, and rhythms pulse and syncopate tightly wound around an imagist’s philosophy to “use absolutely no word that does not contribute to the presentation.” The band’s austere approach to composition and wordplay elevates them above and beyond bands seeking similar sounds; it’s not that they use less; it’s How they use less.

Aubrey Hornor: Guitar, vocals Bob Desaulniers: Bass, guitar, tape loops Wiley Hickson: drums Mason Crumley: Guitar

Taken from the Portland band’s third album, “Tower of Age”, out June 5th, 2020 via Trouble In Mind Records (www.troubleinmindrecs.com)

“When the Tree Bears Fruit” is the debut album from Melbourne four-piece Parsnip. Following on from two 7-inches singles in the last two years, Parsnip’s first full-length album is playful, poetic, propulsive punk. An album perpetually in motion, When the Tree Bears Fruit is just over half an hour of absurd, understated energy. There’s an immediacy to the sheer joy, velocity and whimsy of Parsnip’s delivery.

The band formed in 2016, and played their debut show in a sharehouse living room. When the Tree Bears Fruit was recorded over three days, and truly captures the energy the group are known for live, of a cannily controlled chaos. This is an album that invites its listener to join in its celebration: the record’s title, inspired by the ideas of guru and poet Sri Chinmoy, refers to the idea that a tree will grow fruit and it will be offered for anyone and everyone to share in. The band see this principle as it applies to their work – to sharing their joy and nonsense with the world, and hoping people will enjoy it.

Off-kilter, absurdist, dream/nightmare, 1960s pop forms form the basis for Parsnip’s sound. The fresh Melbourne quartet’s debut album is a fun, funky jaunt that seems all about creative mixing-and-matching, in a minimalist style riddled with quirky organ and singy-songy, art-school nursery rhymes. Not to mention exuberant group singalongs, all four women seemingly joining together for a chorus of delightful weirdness. Parsnip’s been around just a few years, and seems to be having a blast.

Second single from Parsnip’s debut LP, “When The Tree Bears Fruit”, released August 9th in AU/NZ through Anti Fade and out worldwide August 30th through Trouble In Mind.

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Chicago quartet The Hecks have been at it since 2012, starting out as the duo of guitarist Andy Mosiman and Zach Hebert. The band drafted guitarist Dave Vettraino into the fold, a recording engineer who was recording the band’s s/t debut (Trouble In Mind, 2016) & ended up joining the band shortly thereafter. The band’s journey to the end result of “My Star” their second album – has taken them nearly three years in the making.

The new Hecks album is way more fun than anything released by a godchild of Women has any business being. Despite mining the same corner of ’80s pop culture at nearly the same time as Ceremony and Omni, neither of those bands were quite as playful with their homage to new wave, even if that recreational period doesn’t extend all the way to My Star’s repetitive eight-minute closer. The slow build-up of vocals, percussion, synths, and an additional guitar over a single, simple riff across the title-track’s extensive runtime is subtle in a way the rest of the record definitely isn’t, recalling the harsh guitar-rock of their debut.

After recording an initial version of the album in 2017, The Hecks started gigging with new fourth member & keyboardist Jeff Graupner, whose synthesized squiggles added some welcome heft & swagger to the band’s tunes. After reworking & rearranging much of the new material to integrate Graupner, the band scrapped the recordings & rebuilt them from the ground up, incorporating Graupner’s skills at the keys.

Dave V: Vocals / Electric Guitar / Electric Bass Guitar / Engineering
Andy M: Vocals / Electric Guitar / Electric Bass Guitar / Drum Machine / Synthsizer
Jeff G: Vocals / Synthesizer
Zach H: Vocals / Drums / Electric Drums / Drum Machine

“My Star” Trouble In Mind Records, Released on: 2019-10-11

The debut album from Melbourne, Australia quintet Possible Humans has been a long-time coming. Since forming in 2012, the band (comprised of Samuel Tapper, Leon Cranswick, and the three Hewitt brothers; Steven, Adam, and Mark) have self-released a “live improv” cassette & a two-song 7-inch on Sydney’s Strange Pursuits label while periodically teasing a forthcoming full-length and burning up live venues across Australia. Resulting album“Everybody Split” was announced to arrive on April Fool’s Day of 2019 on ex-Twerps drummer Alex MacFarlane’s (very excellent) Hobbies Galore label. Thankfully, it wasn’t a prank & the edition of 200 LPs sold out in a flash. Trouble In Mind is proud to re-release Everybody Split worldwide in a more substantial pressing in hopes of getting this amazing album into everyone’s ears. The album reminds me of why I fell in love with that 80s/90s alt rock sound. Melodies are on point, hooks are plentiful and the guitars are warm and nicely distorted. All is as should be. Early GBV and REM fans, this is your jam

All five members have shared songwriting duties on “Everybody Split”, & the album’s nine tracks jangle and clang with that urgent, nervous energy felt in some of the best DIY/underground rock from the past three decades, R.E.M., Guided By Voices, Feelies et al, but also absolutely of the NOW, swooning with a smoothed, amber patina of melancholy and longing (see opener “Lung of the City”, or “Nomenclature Airspace”).

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There’s a palpable crackle emanating from the tunes on Everybody Split, throwing sparks thru a myriad of interesting melodic/lyrical twists & turns, like the earworm riffage on “The Thumps”, that hotwire solo on “Aspiring To Be A Bloke” or the stutter stops / breakdown in the raging “Stinger”. Stick around for “Born Stoned”, the album’s undeniable highlight, packing its near-12 minutes with nods not only to the aforementioned R.E.M. & Feelies dark jangle, but also the smoke & velvet solos of Heyday-era Church or Blue Oyster Cult. Yes, it’s really that good. Everybody Split was recorded by MacFarlane himself & mastered by Oz-legend Mikey Young for maximum oomph.

released August 2nd, 2019

Possible Humans is: Leon Cranswick, Samuel Tapper, Steve Hewitt, Adam Hewitt and Mark Hewitt.

Taken from the Melbourne band’s debut album “Everybody Split”. released by Trouble In Mind Records on August 2nd, 2019

Trouble In Mind Records is extremely honored to re-release Melbourne band Possible Humans‘ debut album “Everybody Split”. After selling out (in 24-hours no less) of it’s original 200-copy LP run on Melbourne label-du-jour Hobbies Galore, we are releasing it in hopes of getting this amazing album into more people’s record collections! ~ Pressed on Limited Red vinyl while supplies last (& unlimited Black Vinyl after that disappears!).

“It’s so easygoing that one might overlook its fascinating warps of a traditional jangle sound. There’s a beauty in that quality; Possible Humans never demand attention, but they deserve it anyway.”

“It’s a hell of a debut…they’re branching out from the expectations built up among an underground that’s constantly intriguing, but has also cannibalized its influences a few times over. Though the LP was scant, this one’s worth it in any format.”

the album “Everybody Split” (releases April 1, 2019 ) Label: Hobbies Galore

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In the new song “Cotton & Cane” and in the track’s colorful video, psychedelic folk duo Olden Yolk use nostalgia as a road-map for the future. Through layers of warm harmonies, spirited drum fills and bright guitar riffs, Shane Butler and multi-instrumentalist Caity Shaffer craft a kaleidoscopic world that steadily builds on its own momentum, landing somewhere between Laurel Canyon lyricism and Real Estate’s shimmering dream-pop.

“At the time we started writing ‘Cotton & Cane,’ Shane was thinking about his relationship with his father, and the lyrics of the song started to take on the tone of a conversation between them,” the duo shared in a statement about the song. “Less than a week before we went into the studioShane’s father passed away, and the song’s meaning began to unfold completely; the confusion, the awe, the complex picture of his entire life. For us it was a space to reflect on all that had happened over the year and all that we were moving towards.”

Sometimes Olden Yolk grows into new yolk ~ Excited to announce our second full-length LP ‘Living Theatre’, out May 17th on Trouble in Mind Records Listen/watch the video for our first single Cotton & Cane 

Shane and Caity announce their return with Living Theatre, a new effort for Trouble in Mind Records. Once the opening strum of the guitars fades away here, you can tell that there are grander goals in the songwriting with this new album; I love the little notes underneath the surface like the way the keys build gradually or the little hint of a shaker that draws your ear nearer.

From the album ‘Living Theatre’ to be released May 17th, 2019

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Sparrow Steeple’s music exists in its own universe. An imagined utopia (or is it a dystopia?) of wolfmen, murderous wizards, whispering woods & leprechaun treasure. Their second album “Tin Top Sorcerer” arrives near the front end of 2019, just in time for spring to blossom.

Comprised of three members of inscrutable indie legends Strapping Fieldhands (who blazed many musical trails in the Nineties via records for Siltbreeze, Shangri-La & their own Omphalos Records), Sparrow Steeple specialize in mini-opuses that drift & careen haphazardly like Grimm’s Fairy Tales sung by Syd Barrett – psychedelic tales of rapturous joy & sinister machinations by creatures real & imagined, all wrapped around dreamlike tunes of avant folk, psychedelia, and outsider music. “Roll Baby”s drunken-tavern sing-a-long is peppered by blistering guitar leads & wobbly harmonica (courtesy of Philly-legend “Harmonica” Dan Balcer) while “Stabbing Wizards” backwards guitar lends a foggy aura of disquiet to the tale of treachery & betrayal. Despite the fantastic yarns spun (see the tragic tale of the “Wolfman of Mayberry”, or “Girl of the Whispering Woods”), “Tin Top Sorcerer” has an air of realism – or perhaps “magical realism”, that place these songs in a place simultaneously out-of-time and from a possible future, permeated by a sense that these things could actually have happened (or will happen) at some point in our shared existence.

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From the Philadelphia band’s second album “Tin Top Sorcerer”, out April 5th, 2019 via Trouble In Mind Records