Posts Tagged ‘EP2’

Dummy is five people in Los Angeles making music informed by motorik pulse and minimal composition like the Velvet Underground and Cluster before them. Across five tracks, experimental noise and ambient soundscapes intertwine with hypnotic drone-pop and avant-folk.

Earlier this year, Los Angeles noise-pop band Dummy shared their debut release, “Dummy EP”, via Pop Wig Records. In November, the group put out their second release, EP2, available now on cassette via Born Yesterday Records. They shared the song “Pool Dizzy”—which was the first taste of EP2. Their debut was rooted in krautrock and synth-laden noise pop, and they even threw in a foggy folk tune and an eight-minute new age-esque closer. EP2, on the other hand, leans more on hypnotic synths than driving guitars—apart from “Pool Dizzy.” The track’s throbbing beat, murky guitars and retro keyboards are rejuvenating, and their heavenly, overlapping vocals are the cherry on top. It’s the sound of droning pop euphoria.

Dummy returns five months later after “EP1” with “EP2”, their second release of 2020. Featuring a mix of screeching feedback-laden pop songs woven with non-sequitur ambient soundscapes, “EP2” sees the band further developing their drone-pop style with inspiration taken from kosmische, Japanese ambient, new age, and video game music. Recorded mostly at home using freeware and a smartphone, the six tracks forgo polished production in favour of a kaleidoscopic collage of improvisational sketches. Mixed by Joo-Joo Ashworth and mastered by Greg Obis. Available on cassette from Born Yesterday Records.

Dummy – Dummy EP2 (2020) Thursday Morning 00:00 Pool Dizzy 04:35 Nuages 07:31 Mediocre Garden 10:38 Second Contact 14:52 Prime Mover Unmoved 17:04

Exclusive: L.A. Noise Pop Band Dummy Announce <i>EP2</i>, Share New Single "Pool Dizzy"

Earlier this year, Los Angeles noise pop band Dummy shared their debut release, “Dummy EP”, via Pop Wig Records. Now the group has put out their second release “EP2”, Last month, they shared “Pool Dizzy”—the first taste of EP2. Their debut was rooted in krautrock and synth-laden noise pop, and they even threw in a foggy folk tune and an eight-minute new age-esque closer. EP2, on the other hand, leans more on hypnotic synths than driving guitars—apart from “Pool Dizzy.” The track’s throbbing beat, murky guitars and retro keyboards are rejuvenating, and their heavenly, overlapping vocals are the cherry on top. It’s the sound of droning pop euphoria.

Dummy returns five months later with “EP2”, their second release of 2020. Featuring a mix of screeching feedback-laden pop songs woven with non-sequitur ambient soundscapes, “EP2” sees the band further developing their drone-pop style with inspiration taken from kosmische, Japanese ambient, new age, and video game music. Recorded mostly at home using freeware and a smartphone, the six tracks forgo polished production in favour of a kaleidoscopic collage of improvisational sketches.

Available on cassette from Born Yesterday Records.

Dummy – Dummy EP2 Thursday Morning 00:00 Pool Dizzy 04:35 Nuages 07:31 Mediocre Garden 10:38 Second Contact 14:52 Prime Mover Unmoved 17:04

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Sydney-based quartet  Body Type released their critically acclaimed debut EP1 last year and generated a huge buzz after playing SXSW in 2019. The band who comprise of Sophie McComish (guitar and vox), Annabel Blackman (guitar and vox), Georgia Wilkinson-Derums (bass and vox), Cecil Coleman (drums) released their second EP, entitledEP2 this year. “Free To Air” may well be the tune that initially hooks people in. It’s slightly more reflective than their previous release the spiky jagged glory that was “Stingray” but proves that Body Type has got what it takes to make a huge dent in 2020.

“Free To Air” eddies and flows driven by spidery guitars and gorgeous vocal harmonies. It’s a song tinged with beauty and poignancy and is a perfect example of how to craft artful, dazzling, intelligent evocative indie-pop with some style.

Stingray is lifted from EP2, out now via Partisan Records & Inertia Music:

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Body Type’s second EP sounds a step removed from the snarling attitude that the Sydney band exhibited on its debut EP from last year. They gravitate toward more confident hooks, even amid a greater sense of atmosphere. Everything about Body Type on “EP2” sounds bigger, their soaring rock songs built around fuzzy harmonies and barreling energy. On “Stingray,” they sing about an animal that has no spine but is still eager to shock — an apt analogy from a band whose music goes from placid to incisive on the turn of a dime, like a stingray lying in wait for its prey.

“Stingray” is lifted from EP2, out now via Partisan Records & Inertia Music:

Welsh singer-songwriter Bryde aka Paper Aeroplanes songstress Sarah Howells has been drawing approving comparisons to the likes of Angel Olsen and Mitski since releasing her EP1 earlier this year. The likeness doesn’t start and stop at the fact that she’s a female artist with an electric guitar, however; she’s displayed similar ferocity on songs like “Help Yourself” and open fragility on the song “Wait” Yet hers is a voice that deserves attention in and of its own right, something she’ll continue to prove with the November 4th release of EP2.

Already she’s shared the stomping track “Honey” from the next EP, and now she’s showing her bleaker side with “Wouldn’t That Make You Feel Good?”. The track is a moody number dripping with slow guitar plucks that sound like they’re slowly leaking through the darkness. Eventually, they burst through on a fiery bridge as as Bryde confronts a fracturing, unhealthy relationship: “Smoke and mirrors on bathroom walls/ They were never mine/ Never mind/ Just let me love you.”

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Calling it the darkest lyricism she’s ever explored, Bryde says that the song “is less about me than all the others I’ve written. My own experiences were a catalyst to becoming more interested in and reading about certain relationship dynamics and how people can become negatively intwined. Then the lyrics just became something I wrote with other people’s experience in mind. Like actors in a play. It’s about retrospect.”

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