Posts Tagged ‘Protomartyr’

Protomartyr – “You Always Win (feat. Kelley Deal)” taken from the new ‘Consolation E.P.’ out 15th June 2018 on Domino Record Co.

Following on from last year’s release of the critically acclaimed Domino debut, “Relatives In Descent”, PROTOMARTYR are happy to announce Consolation E.P., an EP of brand new material recorded in collaboration with Kelley Deal (The Breeders) and Mike Montgomery (R. RING, AMPLINE).
Recorded in Montgomery own studio, Candyland, the EP’s four songs capture the breadth of mood and stylistic variety of a full-length Protomartyr album – from the short sharp shock of the opener “Wait”, through the mutant pop of “Same Face In A Different Mirror”, the epic “Wheel of Fortune”, to the beautiful closer “You Always Win”. Add to this Montgomery’s  recording skill, and Kelley Deal’s unparalleled vocals, and their arrangements that see the inclusion of Jocelyn Hatch (viola), Evan Ziporyn (bass clarinet), and Lori Goldston (cello), and Consolation E.P. becomes a truly unique prospect in Protomartyr’s discography.
Released June 15th, 2018

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Consolation EP

Detroit’s Protomartyr released yet another solid full-length in “Relatives In Descent”, just last year, but that doesn’t appear making the band interested in taking time off: The upcoming Consolation E.P. offers four new songs, and with a notable guest: Kelley Deal sings on two of them. Mike Montgomery, Deal’s R. Ring bandmate, recorded the EP, so enlisting the Breeders guitarist was an easy step. Her voice nicely counterbalances Joe Casey’s spoken-sung vocals, giving a little ray of lightness to Protomartyr’s frequently bleak, often discordant sound. So it’s settled: more Kelley Deal in everything.

Post-punks Protomartyr are following their acclaimed 2017 album Relatives In Descent with Consolation E.P., a new EP recorded in part with Kelley Deal of The Breeders and set for a June 15th release via Domino Recordings. Two of the EP’s four tracks feature Deal on vocals alongside Protomartyr lead singer Joe Casey, including the snarling track “Wheel of Fortune.”

Protomartyr release a new EP Consolation, which they recorded in part with friend Kelley Deal. Two of the four songs feature Deal on vocals alongside singer Joe Casey. The EP was recorded by Deal’s R.Ring bandmate Mike Montgomery and expandeds Protomartyr’s arrangements with strings and woodwinds.

The video for the Deal-featured track “Wheel Of Fortune” is five minutes of confusing chaos that I can’t turn away from. Directed by Yoonha Park, who handled the band’s also-strange “Don’t Go To Anacita” video, “Wheel Of Fortune” is an amalgamation of bleak, violent imagery paired with an equally jagged, experimental sound. A pulsing skull, a charging, electrified sword, a girl coloring in her entire face with cherry red lipstick, roughly scrapping your knuckle against a brick wall, punching yourself in the face, giving a thumbs up while your hand is on fire flash; these visuals grace the screen all while frontman Joe Casey and Deal repeatedly shout the lyrics “I decide who lives and who dies.” It’s a lot to handle, but aesthetically exciting.

The general vibe is spooky Halloween apocalypse. There’s a solace brought on as the video switches to black and white. The music slows and a hypnotic groove ensues. Though, all that is ended quickly by the chanting of “Hands around their own throats.”

Limited edition of the EP on yellow/white starburst vinyl, includes 12”x24” fold out poster, and MP3 download card.

EP Tracks

  1. 01. Wait
  2. 02. Same Face in a Different Mirror
  3. 03. Wheel of Fortune (feat. Kelley Deal)
  4. 04. You Always Win (feat. Kelley Deal)

Protomartyr – “Wheel of Fortune (feat. Kelley Deal)” taken from the new ‘Consolation E.P.’ out 15th June 2018 on Domino Record Co.

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Protomartyr premiere a new video for their new single ‘Don’t Go To Anacita’.

The track, which will see Protomartyr release their fourth album, Relatives In Descent, is their debut for new label home Domino on Friday.‘Don’t Go To Anacita’, which is strangely straight-forward for Protomartyr, has an unexpected by pleasant anthemic feel and, we’re told, takes place in a fictional town of singer Joe Casey’s invention – a sort of every-town created to catch Casey’s ire.

On top of the new release, the quartet have also announced that they will play London’s Rough Trade East as part of their November European and UK headline tour.

Protomartyr Relatives in Descent review

Protomartyr has never wanted for momentum. The Detroit band, at their best, has always been racing toward an endpoint, driven by a sense of urgency, outrunning some kind of unseen danger or darkness that’s constantly nipping at their heels, in the vapor trails behind Greg Ahee’s guitar riffs or in the pregnant pauses in Joe Casey’s personal narratives or commentaries. Protomartyr aren’t going to revolutionize guitar music. That’s a big ask for any rock band, where many acts are hyper-literate, fiercely political or formally adventurous — though the group possesses all of these strengths. Their consistency is ultimately what sets Protomartyr apart from the pack. Their development has been steady, as each new album broadened the scope and lyrical ambition of its predecessor. Relatives In Descent is a culmination of the band’s potential; they sound a career removed from the scrappy garage punks who released No Passion All Technique just four years ago, even as they remain snidely dissatisfied.”Casey’s sardonic lyrical humor. But most of all, it’s because Protomartyr never stops moving.

“A Private Understanding,” the opening track to the band’s fourth album Relatives in Descent, has a similar feeling to past Protomartyr openers—it’s perpetually on the brink of building up to something, and it feels tense and climactic. But it lingers on moments in a way that few of the band’s songs have before. The verses feel a bit more drawn out, with the first echoing the phrase, “Never wanna hear those vile trumpets anymore,” while the second track recounts a true story of Elvis Presley seeing the face of Stalin in a cloud: “He was affected profoundly, but he could never describe the feeling/He passed away on the bathroom floor.” By the end, Casey croons, “She’s just trying to reach you,” echoing a consistent theme of failed methods of communication and the complicated ways that people process those messages. As empathetically as these figures are drawn, they’re still mired in the fatalistic absurdity of never being able to say what needs to be said. Maybe she’ll never actually reach you; Elvis is dead on his bathroom floor.

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Relatives in Descent, illustrated by its unsettling opening track, is the darkest Protomartyr album to date because it’s so reflective of the time in which it was created. It’s not a political album, but rather a bleakly philosophical album of meditations on the fallible nature of truth and self-destructive ideals that brought us to an age of willful ignorance and “fake news.” Nobody gets off particularly easily here. Casey sneers mockingly throughout the sing-songy punk stomp of “Male Plague,” reminding the self-inflictedly mediocre white men at its core that “Everybody knows it’s gonna kill you someday.” In the brooding “Corpses in Regalia,” he barks, “Decent people don’t live like that,” laying down an indictment on wealth and excess, while the driving “Don’t Go to Anacita” condemns the exploitation inherent in privilege. Only “Up the Tower” actually addresses what sounds a lot like the president, himself, and “the hatred he brewed within us,” following up on an observation of a golden door with a violent command to “knock it down! knock it down! knock it down!” It’s the kind of catharsis that Protomartyr has always done well, dialed up to match the dreadful urgency of the moment.

Some of the darkest moments on the album are those that happen on a purely instrumental level, giving Relatives in Descent a gothic wash of blacks, grays and charcoals. Those hues are rendered brilliantly, their chilling tone resulting in the strongest batch of songs they’ve written to date. The opening riff of standout single “My Children” has a subtly eerie tone, creating an ominous passageway toward its unexpectedly catchy chorus. “Windsor Hum” chimes with a horror-movie-soundtrack riff, underscoring Casey’s reassurance, “everything’s fine,” with the sick-to-your-stomach feeling of knowing that it isn’t. And the reverb-laden sound of closing dirge “Half Sister” finds Protomartyr capturing the grimmest of post-punk gloom brilliantly.

In that final track, Casey says “truth is a half sister,” before looping back to an early refrain from the album, “she is trying to reach you.” In intercepting these communiqués, to better understand why humanity is sometimes doomed to reject truth, Protomartyr delves into some dark places albeit ones that yield their most rewarding results.

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Detroit’s Protomartyr have had a steady rise to gaining the awareness they deserve for their dark, alcohol-soaked post-punk. In 2015 they released The Agent Intellect to widespread acclaim, ending up on many year-end lists or quickly became ‘ones to watch’, even though that was their third album. The advantage of this slow rise into sight is that they’ve had time to hone their vicious and cunning rock – and now for their fourth album they will have an even bigger platform from which to reach people, as they have been signed by Domino Recordings.

Protomartyr’s fourth album will be called Relatives In Descent, a perfectly gloomy-yet-epic title, and it comes out on September 29th. That still feels like some way off, but in the meantime they have presented the 5 minute, album-opening statement ‘A Private Understanding’, which touches on the human condition, longing and Elvis Presley. You can consume that below.

Protomartyr ‘A Private Understanding’ taken from the new album ‘Relatives In Descent’ out September 29th on Domino Recordings

Deluxe edition LP of “Relatives In Descent” is up for pre-order. Limited pressing on multi-colored vinyl, includes 24-page lyric zine and a foldout poster.

Protomartyr The Agent Intellect

Protomartyr: Total bias alert: Protomartyr’s “Under Color of Official Right” was among my top Albums of 2014 by a longshot. (Any band that sounds like Mark E Smith fronting a garage Chameleons…but from Detroit, is going to do it for me.) Their CMJ shows, all of which were great for different reasons: firstly they played two new songs at the Knitting Factory with tailored lyrics of “Tarpeian Rock”They also inspired a crazy pit at Death by Audio; and just basically blew the lid off the Cake Shop where frontman Joe Casey admitted “First time I was at Cake Shop they served Sparks. I got really drunk and yelled at Sean Lennon. Protomartyr – Why Does It Shake – Live in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, three bands came together for a pop-up show announced only days before,

On a Saturday sometime back in  August, Pitchfork presented a pop-up show at Villian. It featured a set from the band Protomartyr, and Pitchfork.tv shared three songs from their performance. Watch them perform “Why Does It Shake?”, “I’ll Take That Applause”, and “How He Lived After He Died” below.

Protomartyr is an American post-punk band formed in 2008 in Detroit, Michigan. It features Joe Casey on vocals, Greg Ahee on guitar, Alex Leonard on drums and  on bass guitar.

Protomartyr – “I’ll Take That Applause” – Live

On August 29th, 2015, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, three bands came together for a pop-up show announced only days before, with a surprise headliner.Protomartyr

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Protomartyr have a new LP ‘The Agent Intellect’ fast approaching, the Detroit-based post-punk mob have unveiled a second cut, the fidgety ‘I Forgive You’. With Screeching, jittery guitars forming the track’s predominant thread, as vocalist Joe Casey’s downbeat drawl, drags things through the dirt. When held up against the previously unveiled ‘Why Does It Shake?’ and ‘Dope Cloud, it’s evidence of Protomartyr’s ability to warp expectations while still keeping things wrapped tight in their familiar post-punk guise.

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‘The Agent Intellect’ will be released via Hardly Art Records on October 9th  To celebrate, the band have plotted a number of UK dates alongside fellow bruisers METZ – as follows:

OCTOBER
30th Brighton, Green Door Store
31st Leeds, Brudenell Social Club

NOVEMBER
1st London, Scala
3rd Bristol, The Fleece
4th Manchester, Sound Control
5th Glasgow, Stereo
6th Birmingham, The Rainbow Cellar
7th Cardiff, Swn Festival

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This October marks the release of Protomartyr’s third and finest work to date, The Agent Intellect. Named after an ancient philosophical questioning of how the mind operates in relation to the self, it’s an elegant and often devastating display of all that makes Protomartyr composed of singer Joe Casey, guitarist Greg Ahee, drummer Alex Leonard, and bassist Scott Davidson—so vital and singularly visceral an outfit.

Over the course of several months, Ahee waded through more than a hundred song fragments until he reached the bottomless melodies , amid the charred pop of “Dope Cloud,” he reassures us that nothing—not God, not money—can or will prevent our minds from unraveling until we finally fade away.
Protomartyr’s third record in three years (following 2013’s No Passion All Technique & 2014’s Under Color of Official Right), the Detroit four-piece is operating with a clear sense of urgency and focus. ” The Agent Intellect “ is out 10th September on Hardly Art Records.