Posts Tagged ‘Massachusetts’

Pile is a rock band, but it plays its songs even the most beautiful, heartbreaking ones as if they were horror films, packed with jump-scares and cliffhangers. Songs swell, building to all-consuming washes, or running right up to the edge of a cliff to dangle there precariously. That type of uneasy adventurousness has always been part of Pile’s makeup, but A Hairshirt Of Purpose streamlines it, offering the most nuanced record of the band’s career while still working in moments of explosive, fiery rage. Tracks like “Fingers” or “Rope’s Length” may be built on simple chord progressions, but they’re manipulated in ways that feel excitingly alien, subverting post-hardcore’s standard loud-to-quiet tonal shifts. Hairshirt is both lovely and ugly, even when—especially when—it doesn’t make a lick of sense.

“Texas” by Pile from the “A Hairshirt of Purpose” LP, out now on Exploding in Sound. Directed by Adric Giles.

Pile is still killing it with songs that can be both blisteringly intense and beautifully melodic. The lyrics continue to confound and amaze me. There’s something I can’t quite place about this album that keeps me coming back to it. It took several listens to the album to make me see past the obvious beauty of ‘Leaning on a Wheel’ and ‘Rope’s Length’, but consider me engrossed.

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If you’re hoping to score some life tips from Camp Cope’s sophomore LP How To Socialise & Make Friends, you might want to look elsewhere.

“It’s not like an instructional album. Like I don’t know how to socialise or make friends,” frontwoman Georgia Maq admits . The Melbourne trio are about to follow their acclaimed, self-titled debut with a record that’s even more raw than the first, if that’s even possible.

“In the last one we had like a couple a harmonies and like a gang vocal and this one is just like fully stripped back, there’s nothing,” Georgia says. “Everything was done just really quickly, how we like it, and I think I don’t care as much for this album. I don’t care what people think.

“I care less because I’m happy with what we’ve done and so anyone else’s opinion doesn’t really matter.”

When she says “really quickly”, she means it. The album was written in a couple of months, and recorded in just two days (though half a day longer than the first). In fact, drummer Sarah ‘Thommo’ Thompson says she booked the tour for this album before a single word was written.

“[We] went ‘Uh oh, now we have to record it’ and we just went to the same place we did last time, just booked two days with nothing written knowing that if we didn’t have dates to aim for we wouldn’t do it,” Thomo says.

The album is totally done now, though we’ll have to wait until March to hear it.

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Camp Cope the band:

gmaq – vocals/guitar
kelly- lead bass
thomo – drums

Pre Oreders for ‘HOW TO SOCIALISE & MAKE FRIENDS now if you’re in australia, hit up www.poisoncityestore.com to check out the different colour options, along with this lovely tee designed by Celeste Potter, & the first ever camp cope stickers. friends throughout the rest of the world! run for cover have a different range of colours for you to choose from over at http://www.runforcoverrecords.com available to order now. thanks so much to everyone who’s helped make this possible, we are stoked for you to hear it

Singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist, former MMOSS guitarist/singer, designer/builder of Mid-Fi Electronics guitar effects. Massachusetts singer songwriter Doug Tuttle returns with his third solo album,
‘Peace Potato’, once again on Chicago label Trouble In Mind Records.
His 2013 solo debut (after fronting his longtime psychedelic band, MMOSS) was an insular and foggy psychedelic masterpiece punctuated by Tuttle’s stinging guitar leads, accented by flashes of bedroom Fairport /Crazy Horse brilliance, towing the line nimbly between elegance and ragged assurance. We last saw Tuttle on “It Calls On Me”, his 2015 sophomore album, which pushed his songwriting towards further clarity and melody; ‘Peace Potato’ shakes it all down with Tuttle’s strongest batch of songs yet.
‘Peace Potato’ introduces itself with the horn-laden, honeydripper,“Bait The Sun”, a classic Tuttle tune; downer pop melodies coloring a hypnagogic landscape. It is indeed that state of lucid dreaming, somewhere between the onset of sleep is where Tuttle firmly plants the seeds of “Peace Potato”. Songs like the addictive Harrison-esque acoustic strummer “Can It Be” and majestic “Only In A Dream” kick in and fade out like the lurching of the mind’s dream state, with the listener’s only guide being Tuttle’s fragmented sensory narrative. (see the undulating, utterly-effected “Life Boat” floating near the end of the first side. Songs stutter to life and grind to a halt, to calculated effect, stitched together into a patchwork of full tunes, song fragments and waves of melodic euphoria.
Throughout all, Tuttle’s guitar picking and soloing echoes the greats of decades prior, Harrison, Thompson, Clarence White, with a conscious eye to the unsung bedroom and basement weird pop genius of sung and unsung artists like Harumi, Sixth Station, The Bachs and Jim Sullivan.

Tuttle played every instrument and recorded the entirety of ‘Peace Potato’ in his Somerville bedroom studio; a ubiquitous location in these modern times, but the ease at which Tuttle’s songs fold and unfold, suggests something more than your usual home recorded musings, “Peace Potato” feels natural and comfortable in it’s skin.

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Juliana Hatfield is back with 14 brand new songs, including the instant-classic “Wonder Why.” “I wasn’t planning on making a record,” says Juliana Hatfield of “Pussycat”. In fact, she thought her songwriting career was on hiatus, and that she had nothing left to say in song form; that she had finally said it all after two decades as a recording artist. But then the presidential election happened. “All of these songs just started pouring out of me. And I felt an urgency to record them, to get them down, and get them out there.”

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Pussycat is the kind of bluntly political record Hatfield used to be knocked for shying away from. At the height of her 1990s stardom, Hatfield was dismissed in the more activist corners of the music world as a lightweight (never mind that her songs frequently explored the ways society needles and dismisses women). She’s spent her career in an often thankless middle ground, too feminine for the masculine music press, yet not punk enough for the riot grrls. But Pussycat lends to the case for a critical reappraisal. Now would be an ideal time for one, given how the DNA of Hatfield’s hooky, plainspoken alterna-pop has carried through some of indie-rock’s sharpest young songwriters, from artists like Waxahatchee to Bully and Charly Bliss, artists that have demonstrated there’s plenty of substance in this sound. What a treat it would be if, 30 years into their careers, they were all making records as relevant, passionate, and strangely personable as this one.

Singer songwriter Doug Tuttle returns with his third solo album, ‘Peace Potato’, once again on Chicago label Trouble In Mind Records.
His 2013 solo debut (after fronting his longtime psychedelic band, MMOSS) was an insular and foggy psychedelic masterpiece punctuated by Tuttle’s stinging guitar leads, accented by flashes of bedroom Fairport /Crazy Horse brilliance, towing the line nimbly between elegance and ragged assurance. We last saw Tuttle on “It Calls On Me”, his 2015 sophomore album, which pushed his songwriting towards further clarity and melody; ‘Peace Potato’ shakes it all down with Tuttle’s strongest batch of songs yet.
‘Peace Potato’ introduces itself with the horn-laden, honeydripper,“Bait The Sun”, a classic Tuttle tune; downer pop melodies coloring a hypnagogic landscape. It is indeed that state of lucid dreaming, somewhere between the onset of sleep is where Tuttle firmly plants the seeds of “Peace Potato”.

Songs like the addictive Harrison-esque acoustic strummer “Can It Be” and majestic “Only In A Dream” kick in and fade out like the lurching of the mind’s dream state, with the listener’s only guide being Tuttle’s fragmented sensory narrative. (see the undulating, utterly-effected “Life Boat” floating near the end of the first side. Songs stutter to life and grind to a halt, to calculated effect, stitched together into a patchwork of full tunes, song fragments and waves of melodic euphoria.
Throughout all, Tuttle’s guitar picking and soloing echoes the greats of decades prior, Harrison, Thompson, Clarence White, with a conscious eye to the unsung bedroom and basement weird pop genius of sung and unsung artists like Harumi, Sixth Station, The Bachs and Jim Sullivan. Tuttle played every instrument and recorded the entirety of ‘Peace Potato’ in his Somerville bedroom studio; a ubiquitous location in these modern times, but the ease at which Tuttle’s songs fold and unfold, suggests something more than your usual home recorded musings, “Peace Potato” feels natural and comfortable in it’s skin.

released May 5th, 2017

Singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist, former MMOSS guitarist/singer, designer/builder of Mid-Fi Electronics guitar effects.

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On their debut self-titled record, Horse Jumper of Love present nine intensely intimate songs. Combining the slowed the slowed down indie rock of Codeine and Duster with the melancholy gravitas of Mt. Eerie, Horse Jumper’s songwriting is marked by expertly crafted minimalism.

Initially released on cassette by Boston’s Disposable America, ‘Horse Jumper of Love’ is now available on vinyl for the first time ever with the addition of “Orange Peeler,” a bonus track previously not featured on the album.

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A companion piece to the 2016 LP ‘Strangers,’ consisting of home recordings contemporary to that album’s sessions. Strangers is a beautiful and haunting record,  these recordings are a superb addition.

Marissa brought us a beautiful album full of melancholy..her voice and melodies are taking us out there. All the colors of the dark makes me shivering, and from now on, Marissa is not a stranger for me anymore. Please take time to listen to her incredible record. You will not be disappointed !

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I do enjoy this music very much, the voice, the rhythms and the lyrics. Balancing wide-eyed winsomeness with admirable adventurism, “You Won’t” gallops all over the musical map, crafting badlands death ballads, bagpipes-over-Baghdad folk jams, and road-trip sing-alongs. Josh Arnoudse (vocals and guitar) and Raky Sastri (singing saw, electric bagpipes, whirly tube, and kitchen sink) do indeed come on as revolutionaries, taking one of rock’s most limited formats—the two-piece—and dragging it places the Black Keys and White Stripes never dreamed of.

I love all of You Won’t’s music videos so much that I can’t look away from YouTube while I’m listening to the music so the only way to really listen to the music by itself was to buy the album. Totally worth it, little lighter on the nostalgia and anticapitalism than Skeptic Goodbye but a little catchier. “Ya Ya Ya” is the obvious single but not the only fun and great song on the disc!

Magic Shoppe’s ‘Wonderland’ unfurls its warm & fuzzy tendrils from deep within the grip of a sonic maelstrom. This record has everything from haunting creepy boy/girl harmonies saturated with reverb, to drugged-out swathes of 60’s sounding guitar riffs covered in fuzz and delay. Great stuff from an authentically diverse American band

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Marissa Nadler is an American musician and fine artist based in Boston. Active since 2000, she is currently signed to Sacred Bones Records and Bella Union in the UK. Marissa recently released her seventh full-length studio album, Strangers, in May 2016.

Singing in a mezzo soprano , Nadler has received acclaim for her vocals. Her voice was described as one “you would follow straight into Hades”, and also “textured and angelic, with just a hint of pain captured within her iridescent falsetto”. She has a voice that, in mythological times, could have lured men to their deaths at sea, an intoxicating soprano drenched in gauzy reverb that hits bell-clear heights, lingers, and tapers off like rings of smoke”.  Her music “is rooted in old-school country and folk

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All Songs written by Marissa Nadler*
the Band
Marissa Nadler- acoustic guitar, vocals
Jim Callan- pedal steel
Orion Rigel Dommisse- rhodes, synth, vocals
Helena Espvall- cello
Ben McConnell- drums, percussion
Brian McTear- cymbal swells, drums, percussion
Carter Tanton- electric guitar, vibraphone, synth bass, bass, vocals, tambourine
*Puppet Master written by Marissa Nadler/ Carter Tanton

Produced by Brian McTear