Posts Tagged ‘Tim Nelson’

Image may contain: 4 people

New York’s Maxband, the newest project featuring Max Savage of Parquet Courts and Patrick Smith of A Beacon School, first debuted in 2018 with its low-key tape release Perfect Strangers. The band has since played support slots for Sports Team, Bambara, Tokyo Police Club, The Men, and others. The band recently returned to the studio to record their forthcoming EP, Top of The Stairs, out November 20th, and have released the first single from the project, “Cut It Loose”.

Savage, the longtime drummer of Parquet Courts, takes the lead with Maxband, playing guitar and splitting vocal duties with Patrick Smith who also plays bass. Long time friends Tim Nelson and Eric Read fill out the line up on lead guitar and drums respectively. Considering the band sports his name, it would be easy to pigeonhole Maxband as a Max Savage showcase yet, if “Cut It Loose” is anything to go off of, the band seems to be taking a more collaborative approach while carving their own lane independent of the nervy punk rock of Parquet Courts.  

The rapid-fire palm-mutes and clean guitar tone give the track a bright indie flavour, bolstered by Smith’s buoyant vocals. Savage’s vocals on the chorus offer a strong counterpoint, sounding not unlike his brother Andrew’s vocals with Parquet Courts. Add in some razor-sharp call and response guitar leads and the track has an undeniable hook. At the climax, the hook gains even more urgency as the whole band locks into the groove, and Savage’s vocals gain even more of a punk edge. Yet, the band keeps the energy locked down, striking a perfect balance between breezy and fervent attitude.

The band says, “‘Cut It Loose’ was the first song we wrote for Top of the Stairs, and it functions as a good mission statement for where we are as a band: it was our first fully collaborative effort that was fleshed out from an idea that Patrick brought into a practice space, and the first song where Max and Patrick split vocal duties.”

The New York City outfit released their debut EP “Top Of The Stairs” via Holm Front, a label run by U.K. indie band Sports Team. Maxband features lead vocalist Max Savage (Parquet Courts), bassist/vocalist Patrick Smith (A Beacon School), along with drummer Eric Read and lead guitarist Tim Nelson. The five-track EP was produced by Doug Schadt (Maggie Rogers, Ashe), and recorded in Brooklyn in late 2019 and early 2020. It follows their 2018 debut album Perfect Strangers. Top Of The Stairs is imbued with an effortless confidence. Both their vocals and guitars oscillate between gentle and vehement, creating this satisfying contradiction of steady and unsteady. With shades of misty indie rock and driving post-punk, Maxband create something special out of familiar elements. 

From ‘Top Of The Stairs’ EP out November 20th

Open uri20200708 21080 tth0fn?1594224263

“I’m prepared to tell everybody everything.” This statement from Cub Sport frontman and songwriter Tim Nelson, so clear-eyed and headstrong in its intent, is at the heart of the beloved Brisbane four-piece’s new album. “Like Nirvana”, is the band’s fourth record, embraces every side of Nelson: the angelic lightness as wellas the multiplicitious, haunted darkness. It recasts them and their bandmatesmulti-instrumentalists Zoe Davis, Sam Netterfield, and Dan Puusaarias fearless innovators, experimentalists willing to blow up everything about the Cub Sport of old in order to create this dazzling and daring new chapter.

Described by Nelson as more of a holistic release from Cub Sport in contrast to their largely linearearly records, This is a glistening, tightly-woven exploration of religious reckoning, oppressive structures of masculinity, and feelings of inadequacy. Dovetailing with a shift in Nelson’s gender expression they now identify as ‘free’, and use both neutral and male pronouns the record is impressionistic and abstract, pushing aside the brightly coloured realism of 2019’s self-titled record in favour of gauzy lucid dreams. Nelson’s embrace of raw emotion has pushed them and their bandmates, to create a record more fiercely emotive than ever.

The wonderful new Cub Sport video for their latest single ‘Be Your Man’ is an absolute must watch. Inspired by reigning queen Kate Bush’s ‘Wuthering Heights’, the ‘Be Your Man’ visual is dramatic and beautiful, a middle finger to any binary societal norms about what it is to ‘be a man’. If you liked what you heard in ‘Be Your Man’ then fear not, as the band have a whole bag of new tracks for you, in what we like to call an album. ‘Like Nirvana’ came out at the end of last month and is, in the words of NME ‘their most stunning album yet’.

“Be Your Man” is taken from our fourth album “Like Nirvana”, out July 24th.

Image may contain: 1 person

One of Australia’s best band’s Cub Sport have released their fourth album. Sitting at 13-tracks long, “Like Nirvana” is a beautiful and deeply honest trip through the mind of singer-songwriter-producer Tim Nelson. Navigating topics like gender, personal discovery and ultimately evolution, the alt-pop group from Brisbane the record which is a collection of soft, dreamy pop songs. Originally slated for a May release, Like Nirvana was pushed back due to the COVID pandemic, but the wait was worth it.

Tim Nelson tals about the group’s new LP, Like Nirvana”, is an uplifting release that doesn’t shy away from the shadows, “it embraces both the light and dark with warmth.”

In Confessions there’s a line ‘the truth is I’m looking for myself and I can’t see it in anybody’. And I couldn’t, but now I can. It sounds a little cliché but this album has helped me find and love myself more deeply. I listen to this album and I can see, hear, feel ‘me.’ It’s the gentle and powerful energy of the introvert empath who, for some reason, is drawn to the light, even though they’re scared of it sometimes and feel more at home in the shadows. It’s the acknowledgement of lingering trauma, an embracing of the journey, rather than a need to see and understand the destination.

The track Nirvana is kind of the title track. It embodies some of the most important lessons I’ve learned over the last year. ‘Free myself from ego’s chains, free my body from my mind, leave the painful parts behind.’ It’s about learning my own worth outside of other peoples’ perception of me. In western society, we’re largely taught that our value is tied to the material things we have, how we appear to others, our career progress, what the world tells us about ourselves. I wanted to strip all of that away and form my own self not built by others. It’s by no means easy to do, but being aware of when your actions are motivated by ego/fear rather than love can be a strong guiding force.

In the second verse of 18 there’s a line ‘sorry, didn’t wanna make this sad, guess I wrote this all to try and heal from that, to let me feel all that’. I always wanted this album to be uplifting. I think in my mind I had this idea that to be uplifting it had to sound ‘happy’ but I couldn’t write any happy-sounding songs that I was excited about, but rather these cinematic, all-encompassing laments. I had to write this album as part of my healing process, I had to let myself feel everything and experience and live all of the emotions that were weighing on me. And I feel like that’s what has made Like Nirvana such an uplifting record in its completion; it doesn’t shy away from the shadows, it embraces both the light and dark with warmth and I hope it sets other people free in ways that it’s done for me.

The closing song on the album is Grand Canyon. I wrote this song for someone very dear to me. I wanted them to see them the way that I see them. ‘You’re a mountain, baby, Grand Canyon, you hold all the power if you believe it then you can, yeah. Too much of an angel to be held down, your battles, too much of an angel to be held down.’ It’s anthemic and soaring, pure power and warmth. It ended up becoming a reminder to me of my own power when I needed encouragement. I feel like this song was brought to me for the purpose of inspiring and empowering people who need it. And that goes beyond this song alone, I feel like that’s largely why Like Nirvana the album came to me.

Like Nirvana becomes a landmark moment in Australian pop, contextualising Nelson’s life and art on a universal scale. “Forget the limits that we learned / The light is coming, it’s our turn / You’re a mountain baby, Grand Canyon / You hold all the power,” Nelson sings on Grand Canyon, joined by bandmates united as a choir.

“It really feels heavenly,” Nelson says. “That’s kind of what making this album has felt like for me: finding a more peaceful place; getting to know myself better; acknowledging my whole self, even the parts that are hard to acknowledge sometimes.”

Nelson’s emotional purge continues on ‘My Dear (Can I Tell You My Greatest Fear)’, where his voice and soul are laid bare over spectral guitar fuzz and feather-light instrumentation. ‘I Feel Like I Am Changin’’picks up where ‘Sometimes’ left off on ‘Cub Sport’, with Nelson, back in Brisbane after a period of relentless touring, experiencing a newfound appreciation for home. ‘Be Your Man’ is an ’80s power ballad complete with dramatic Phil Collins-style drums while ‘Be Your Angel’ pays homage to Savage Garden’s ‘Truly Madly Deeply’. Like Nirvana” is an emotional voyage of self-discovery that celebrates the joys of life. This album captures some of Tim Nelson’s most vulnerable moments. Elegantly understated and, for the most part, supremely chill, Cub Sport have stripped back the synth-pop hooks to create mellow clouds of sound intended to provide a little comfort and succour.

Four albums in. It’s evident in their staggering creative, aesthetic, and personal evolution, particularly over the past couple of years. Described by Nelson as more of a holistic release from Cub Sport in contrast to their largely linearearly records, This is a glistening, tightly-woven exploration of religious reckoning, oppressive structures of masculinity, and feelings of inadequacy. Dovetailing with a shift in Nelson’s gender expression they now identify as ‘free’, and use both neutral and male pronouns the record is impressionistic and abstract, pushing aside the brightly coloured realism of 2019’s self-titled record in favour of gauzy lucid dreams. Nelson’s embrace of raw emotion has pushed them and their bandmates, to create a record more fiercely emotive than ever.
Band Members
Tim Nelson, Zoe Davis , Sam Netterfield and Dan Puusaari

Cub Sport’s fourth album Like Nirvana, out July 24th

No automatic alt text available.

Parquet Courts have had a busy year, releasing great new album Wide Awake! back in May and touring almost nonstop since. The individual members also keep themselves occupied when not immersed in PC duties, and drummer Max Savage (brother of singer/guitarist Andrew Savage) formed his own group, Maxband, this year. Despite the name, Maxband is more than Max (who sings and plays guitar here). Bassist Patrick Smith (A Beacon School) also brings production/mixing skills, and the group is rounded out by drummer Eric Read (Bob Dylan Deathwatch) and lead guitarist Tim Nelson (Architectural Digest) — all four contribute to the songwriting.

http://

Maxband began playing back in the spring (shows have included opening slots for The Men and Tokyo Police Club), and they released their debut, Perfect Strangers, back in August via Gentle Reminder. (Perfect Strangers was their original name.) As a singer, Max sounds a little like his brother, but no one will mistake this record for Parquet Courts. There are riffy jammers (“Spent,” “Means to an End”), and a real fondness for ethereal dream pop, too. That side comes out on super catchy single “Jerry” — which features Patrick on lead vocals — and driving instrumental “Underground.” There’s a little Pavement-style indie rock creeping into songs like “Baggage Claim” but it too is on its own Maxband tangent. With eight songs clocking in at 24 minutes, Perfect Strangers is a quick, fun listen that leaves you wanting more.

released August 24, 2018

Image result

Reminiscent of Depeche Mode’s mid-career work. These catchy tunes are disguising dark feelings the full length debut from Brisbane, Australian pop-rock four-piece Cub Sport has been criminally overlooked here and in the states.  The album tackles the exploitation of women (“It Kills Me”) as well as the complicated feelings of making music  (“Come On Mess Me Up”) and of being in a relationship (“I’m On Fire”).  Despite the tough subject matter, the entire album seems effortless.  Tim Nelson’s angelic voice and his bandmates’ supporting harmonies and musical layers present new surprises with every listen.