Posts Tagged ‘Bella Union Records’

Proof rings out with force and feeling on Hilang Child’s superlative second album, “Every Mover”, released on Bella Union Records. In 2018, Riman delivered a serene, textured debut album in Years, rich in sound and feeling. The “lonely, pressured” aftermath of Years found Riman grappling with “rough self-esteem and anxiety issues”, amplified in part by social media’s ‘fulfilment narratives’. Duly, he set out to navigate and overcome these mindsets, drawing deeply on his own insecurities and those he recognised in others.

These themes converge emphatically on Every Mover, an album steeped in everyday emotional states and crafted for cathartic, communal performance. Drawing on a rich spread of collaborators, sounds and themes, Riman uses his frustrations as the impetus to transform the brimming promise of Years into upfront and expansive new shapes.

Good to be Young serves swift notice of this leap, its banked synths and twinkling sound clusters leading to an assertion of fresh force when the main beat lands and a congregation of friends – AK Patterson, Paul Thomas Saunders, Dog in the Snow, Ellen Murphy, members of Penelope Isles – unite for the gang-vocal refrains. “It’s all iridescent colour I’m on,” Riman exults, a claim lived up to on the full-flush folktronica of Shenley. A reflection on spiralling insecurity,Seen the Boreal ups the ante again with its monk-ish chorales, looping samples, spectral woodwinds (from multi-instrumentalist John ‘Rittipo’ Moore, of Public Service Broadcasting and Bastille previous) and ecstatic chorus, Riman transforming a meditation on hindsight’s limiting effects into a spur to look forwards. And surge forwards he does with the glittering synths, spacey guitars, and Krautrock propulsion of King Quail, developed in jam sessions with dream-pop wonder Zoe Mead (Wyldest) in her basement studio.

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Riman’s sounds are enriched wherever you turn, from the epic prog-tronica of The Next Hold to the vocal release and layered arrangement of “Play ’Til Evening”; a kind of summit meeting between Surrender-era Chemical Brothers and Fleet Foxes in the high church of ecstatic sound. The treated chorales of Magical Fingertip and naked lyrics of the festival-sized “Anthropic (Cold Times)” showcase a fertile push-pull of lush arrangements and wide-open emotions in Riman’s sound; on the latter, Rittipo’s horns brim with expressive power.

Brought to a sublime close with Steppe, the resulting album projects its own epiphanic force. The birth was not always smooth: due to Covid-19, tours were cancelled and studios closed. Thankfully, most of the main parts were recorded pre-lockdown between East London, Gateshead, Brighton, Wandsworth and elsewhere, before mixing proceeded remotely.

That sense of passion lights up Every Mover, an album that hymns the redemptive qualities of richly expressive music crafted in simpatico unison with friends.

Over the moon that my new album Every Mover is out TODAY via Bella Union/PIAS!! It’s available on 180g red vinyl (with signed print), CD or digital download. 

Also check out the music video for ‘Pesawat Aeroplane (English)’ on YouTube or at the bottom of this email, featuring some trippy mountain visuals using stunning footage captured in Komodo by Tobias Brent and Lifted Imaging. Thank you to Everyone who was involved in the making of this album, from the bottom of my heart. You helped me make something I’m proud of and focus my energy during a difficult time. Onwards xxx

Taken from the new album Every Mover, available on vinyl,

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Lancaster, PA’s Innocence Mission have been making delicate dreampop for longer than that descriptor has existed, with Karin Peris’ heartbreaking voice forever the star of the show. Draped in aching melancholy, “See You Tomorrow” is among the group’s finest in a span over a 30 year plus career. Alternative folk act The Innocence Mission first gained recognition in 1989, when they found chart success with their self-titled debut album. By the time the band released their third album, Glow, in 1995, they had earned a zealous cult following that remains loyal to them to this day. Their songs tend to be exquisitely crafted, featuring ethereally beautiful acoustic-based music and hauntingly introspective and thoughtful lyrics, all combining into a sound that is at once delicate yet intense. The band, led by married couple Karen Peris (vocals, guitar, piano, organ) and Don Peris (guitars, drums vocals), originated when they first met in high school. Now, more than thirty years later, they (along with bassist Mike Bitts) are preparing to release their twelfth studio album,

Love. Connection. Community. Understanding. Most of us experience these aspects through the prism of family and friends. But not everybody can turn those feelings into song, especially not with the beauty and sensitivity of Pennsylvania trio the innocence mission, fronted by Karen Peris and husband Don. Following their Bella Union album debut “Sun On The Square”, which won the band some of their best-ever reviews, they have made another exquisite and touching album, “See You Tomorrow“.

This is a record steeped in awe and wonder, intense longing, sadness and joy; a rich sequence of songs that attempt to describe the essence of what makes us human. Sufjan Stevens, who has covered the innocence mission’s classic Lakes Of Canada, once called their music “moving and profound. What is so remarkable about Karen Peris’ lyrics is the economy of words, concrete nouns which come to life with melodies that dance around the scale like sea creatures.” The band recorded See You Tomorrow in the Peris’ basement (and the dining room where the piano sits). Karen wrote and sang ten of the album’s eleven songs, and plays guitars, piano, pump organ, accordion, electric bass, melodica, mellotron, and an old prototype strings sampler keyboard. Don contributes guitars, drums, vocal harmonies, and one lead vocal on his song Mary Margaret In Mid-Air. Fellow founder member Mike Bitts adds upright bass to four songs including On Your Side, the album’s first single.

With wistful strings and distant acoustic guitar, “On Your Side” sounds like the first chill of autumn.

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Once Wayne Coyne saw Runnin’ Down a Dream, a 2007 documentary on Tom Petty, he became fixated on a stop Tom Petty made through Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1974 and his recording in that city with the earliest inception of the Heartbreakers—along with Belmont Tench and Mike Campbell—as Mudcrutch.  Manoeuvering through imagined scenarios and what-ifs, the Flaming Lips frontman became caught in some imaginary realm between his Oklahoma upbringing, the current state of America, and an imaginary jam session with the late rock legend. Imagine if the Lips were a local Oklahoma band that befriended Petty in his pre-Heartbreakers days—or what if Tom and company were pulled into the seedier side of Tulsa, shifting the course of rock history as we know it?

Running down a rabbit hole of reflections, the Lips’ sixteenth album “American Head” drifts through the singer’s wild imagination, exploring addiction and mental health in its drug-induced Americana. “As we destroy our brains / ’Til we believe we’re dead / It’s the American dream,” Coyne sings on “At the Movies on Quaaludes” before the more revelatory “Now I see the sadness in the world / I’m sorry I didn’t see it before” on “Mother I’ve Taken LSD.” Following up  Lip$haa proposed 2014 album with Kesha, and collaborating on the psych-pop experiment Miley Cyrus & Her Dead Petz in 2015, for American Head, the Lips cozied up to Kacey Musgraves for some feminine texture on three of the record’s tracks. Only The Flaming Lips could conjure up their American Head narrative, mixing loosely based recollections, romanticized tales…and the state of the country as we think we know it.

American Legends The Flaming Lips are pleased to announce the release of their 21st studio album, American Head released on September 11th via Bella Union. The album is comprised of thirteen new cinematic tracks, produced by long time collaborator Dave Fridmann and The Lips. Among them, “God and the Policeman” featuring backing vocals from country superstar Kasey Musgraves. American Head takes on a welcome temporal shift that occupies a similar space to that of The Soft Bulletin or Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots and just may be their most beautiful and consistent work to date

American Head finds The Flaming Lips basking in more reflective lyrical places as Wayne Coyne explains in a longer form story titled “We’re An American Band.”  Excerpt below:

The Flaming Lips are from Oklahoma. We never thought of ourselves as a band. I know growing up (when I was like 6 or 7 years old) in Oklahoma I was never influenced by, or was very aware of any musicians from Oklahoma. We mostly listened to the Beatles and my mother loved Tom Jones (this is in the 60’s)… it wasn’t till I was about 10 or 11 that my older brothers would know a few of the local musician dudes.

So… for most of our musical life (as The Flaming Lips starting in 1983) we’ve kind of thought of ourselves as coming from ‘Earth’… not really caring Where we were actually from. So for the first time in our musical life we began to think of ourselves as ‘AN AMERICAN BAND’… telling ourselves that it would be our identity for our next creative adventure. We had become a 7-piece ensemble and were beginning to feel more and more of a kinship with groups that have a lot of members in them. We started to think of classic American bands like The Grateful Dead and Parliament-Funkadelic and how maybe we could embrace this new vibe.

The music and songs that make up the American Head album are based in a feeling. A feeling that, I think, can only be expressed through music and songs. We were, while creating it, trying to NOT hear it as sounds… but to feel it. Mother’s sacrifice, Father’s intensity, Brother’s insanity, Sister’s rebellion…I can’t quite put it into words.

Something switches and others (your brothers and sisters and mother and father…your pets) start to become more important to you…in the beginning there is only you… and your desires are all that you can care about…but… something switches.. I think all of these songs are about this little switch.”

The Flaming Lips return on Bella Union Records with American Head, their 21st studio album. They’ve pulled off a masterstroke here, it retains all of their bubbling psychedelics, whilst sounding more introspective or reflective than they have in years. It’s a cracking set of songs and very pretty too.

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Lanterns On The Lake‘s Hazel Wilde has spoken to NME about their nomination for Hyundai Mercury Prize. The Newcastle band have scored their first Mercury nod with their acclaimed fourth album ‘Spook The Herd’ – which sees them employing their unique brand of atmospheric indie to dissect the hell-scape that we’re all living through. Rising nationalism and entire countries being let down by their leaders are all pertinent themes on the record, but they are always tackled with a degree of impressive subtlety.

“We never do sit down and say ‘this is what we’re going to write a record about’, because it feel too forced and not natural,” said Wilde.

“But that stuff, climate change and global politics is just what you see when you’re flicking through the news. Those things are on my mind and they’re the things we talk about as a band. It seeps into the music.” She continued: “We’re not political with a ‘capital P’ in the songs, but not in a social commentary kind of way – it’s a personal point of view. We’re not trying to lecture anybody or proclaim that we’ve got the big answers to massive questions. It’s coming from the point of view of people who are just living in these weird times.”

“We’ve just discovered that there’s been a big leak in our rehearsal room and a load of stuff is knackered. It would come in pretty useful for that! But we’re not thinking of the winnings – we’re just chuffed to be on the shortlist and have the album heard by more people,” Hazel explained.

And while fans had to wait five years for the arrival of ‘Spook The Herd’, it seems that the follow-up could be here sooner than expected. She added: “I’m really itching to get started on the next one. We do have a few ideas that we started on, but that had to take a backseat at the start of this lockdown. I’m itching to just getting cracking on the next one, I’m sure it will find its own way.”

Mercury Prize nominees Lanterns on the Lake released a live rendition of their beguiling track When It All Comes True ahead of their album and had us hooked. Of the track vocalist Hazel Wilde says: ‘Sometimes when you write a song you are creating a world in the same way a film maker or an artist painting a scene would. This is a twisted coming-of-age love story where we’re let in on the thoughts of what seems like a deranged narrator with a premonition.’

“Spook the Herd” was the fourth studio album to come from Lanterns on the Lake. It was released on 28th February 2020 under Bella Union Records.

Having earned a mercury music nom for their stunning lp earlier in the year, Lanterns on the Lake are back already with a 5-track ep of dream-pop bliss. if you’re new to them & yet to hear what all the fuss is about, this’ll be the perfect snapshot of a band whose understanding of engrossing melodies & captivating atmospheres is second to none.

The ep includes four brand new tracks as well as a new reworked stripped-back arrangement of the single “Baddies”. of the track and ep vocalist Hazel Wilde says: “the realist is a song about being a dreamer, clinging to a vision and following your heart – even when that path can seem deluded to others. it was one of the songs that didn’t make it onto the album spook the herd as it didn’t fit sonically or narratively. it felt like it came from another place. so we began putting together this ep. we wanted to sculpt an intimate “Headphones” record. one for the introverts and dreamers, the ones that still find beauty and magic in things. recording some of the songs over lockdown in our homes helped in creating that world.”

Taken from The Realist EP out 11th December 2020 on Bella Union Records.

Emmy The Great shares Chang-E

With her new album “April /月音” due for release 9th October via Bella Union Records, and having recently been featured in The ObserverEmmy The Great today shares a beguiling part-animated video for her new single “Chang-E”. Of the track Emmy says: “It begins with this. Chang-E, the wife of the tyrant Hou Yi, drinks the elixir of immortality to save China from his eternal reign. She ascends to the moon, and lives there with the Jade Rabbit, its original inhabitant. In Mid-Autumn, we celebrate Chang-E’s sacrifice with a festival of lanterns and lights. Many centuries later, NASA tells the moon-bound Apollo 11 astronauts to look out for the Chinese queen and her rabbit. Michael Collins replies, ‘We’ll keep a close eye out for the bunny girl.’”

Of the video Emmy adds: “I wanted to tell the story of the moon goddess as I heard it as a child. It’s a lesser known version of the famous legend (which forms the centrepiece of Mid-Autumn celebrations), and all the more evocative because Chang-E’s destiny is decided by an act of defiance. I had worked with animator Renee Zhan on her film O Black Hole, and I knew she would understand the story and its roots. The creative team also included Mona Chalabi (storyboard), Armiliah Aripin (editing), and Jesse Romain (production). In the fragmented lives we’re living in at the moment, the ideas came together remotely from around the world. This is reflected in the footage between the animation, which is from my personal archive, and a performance of Chang-E on Hong Kong’s RTHK, that I performed while 5 months pregnant.”

“Combining Canto pop with warm neo-folk, her songs are beautifully constructed, the arch quirkiness of her early albums replaced by the lush writing of songs such as Chang-E or Okinawa.” MOJO

“An album filled with soft, tender indie-folk… ‘Mary’ skips along via a country-tinged shuffle, adding to the ever-present feeling of gliding through a city.” Uncut

 

“If you have a vacancy for another favourite new band on your listening device, Pom Poko would like to apply for the role,” tweeted Tim Burgess last April, as Norway’s finest punk-pop anti-conformists revisited their joyous debut album, “Birthday”, for one of Tim’s mood-lifting twitter listening parties.

Pom Poko pimp their cv on all fronts with their glorious second album, “Cheater”, is due for release via Bella Union in November. between the quartet’s sweet melodies, galvanic punky ructions and wild-at-art-rock eruptions, Cheater is the sound of a band celebrating the binding extremes that make them so uniquely qualified to thrill: and, like Tim’s listening party, to fulfil any need you might have for a pick-you-up. as singer Ragnhild Fangel explains of the leap from “Birthday” to “Cheater”, “I think it’s very accurate to say that we wanted to embrace our extremes a bit more. in the production process I think we aimed more for some sort of contrast between the meticulously written and arranged songs and a more chaotic execution and recording, but also let ourselves explore the less frantic parts of the Pom Poko universe.

I think both in the more extreme and painful way, and in the sweet and lovely way, this album is kind of amplified.” both sonically and thematically, that sense of amplification asserts itself right off the bat with the tearaway title-track. bursting into life on the back of a blast of fractious guitar noise, a thrashing riff and a sweetly sardonic vocal, “Cheater” laces its serotonin rush with tangy lyrics about dreams and, says Ragnhild, the kind of “cheating kid who doesn’t understand why they didn’t get things exactly like they wanted on their first try”: thematic motifs that reverberate throughout the album. from here, Pom Poko court their extremes with firecracker confidence. its lilting melody laced with a critique of gender stereotypes and set to a breeders-style lurch, “like a lady” is sharp and catchy. “Andrew” upholds a facility for simplicity in one of Pom Poko’s loveliest choruses, though a band such as this will never settle for the obvious: Martin Miguel tonne’s jazzy guitars seem to do everything except what you expect them to.

Further evidence arrives in the contrast between the thrilling, think-on-its-feet thrash-pop of “My Candidacy” – made in less than three hours – and the mellifluous “Danger Baby”, a tale of irrational fears with Ragnhild’s vocal and Martin’s guitar merged in unexpected union. That love for surprise synchronicities, slanted sounds and unexpected subject matter propels “Andy Go To School”, where a tempo-tweaked guitar line accompanies a lyric extolling the pleasures of water parks and a free-flowing sonic palette. “Towards the end one of the guitar pedals made a huge bzzz sound in a pause, but we thought it was cool and raw so we just rolled with it,” says Ragnhild. “We like to mix the feeling of a surgically produced piece of music with the random sounds that also happen when you are a band playing together.” after its opening, almost Bolan-esque belches of guitar, “Look” extends that spirit of openness to an invitation to look outside of one’s self, before “Body Level” ends the album on a characteristically generous, unguarded – amplified – note of positivity. “Things Get Better,” sings Fangel, embracing directness with the same readiness as Pom Poko exult in giddy intricacy. The sound of four distinct personalities driving in divergent directions towards one destination, the result is an evolved snapshot of the bracingly contrary chemistry forged when Fangel, Tonne, Jonas Krøvel (bass) and Ola Djupvik (drums) united to play punk during a jazz gig at a literature festival in Trondheim (the band-members studied jazz there.) taking their name and spirit from japanese animation visionaries studio Ghibli’s marvellously out-there film about raccoon-dog rebels with unfeasibly large testicles, Pom Poko showcased that convulsive individuality to exuberant effect on 2019’s Birthday. along the way, they drew praise from NME, interview magazine, DIY, Popmatters, the Line of Best Fit, the Independent and BBC radio 6, where Miranda Sawyer was moved to note that Birthday’s “Crazy Energy Night” seems to contain about 20 songs in one.

Meanwhile, a huge touring schedule included countless sold-out headline shows and a rapturously received uk jaunt with Ezra Furman. Written in the same run that produced interim releases “Leg Day” (with its playful dance-based video) and “Praise”, and recorded/produced in cooperation with Marcus Forsgren (jaga jazzist, broen, arc iris), Cheater does its predecessor proud on every front. bursting with colour and wonky life from its cover art (by close collaborator Erlend Peder Kvam) outwards, it differs from Birthday primarily in that its songs did not have a chance to be road-tested before going into the studio. but you wouldn’t know it. as Ragnhild explains, “that meant we had to practice the songs in a more serious way, but it also meant the songs had more potential to change when we recorded them since we didn’t have such a clear image of what each song should/could be as the last time.” in other words, consider that vacancy for free-thinking punk-pop adventurism in your life filled.

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I hope that you all are safe right now, and have found some moments of joy in amongst all the upheaval and worry and sorrow of the last three months. My lockdown has been up and down, with moments of despair, moments of gratitude, and lots of tiny gifts in the form of love and humanity. I cannot wait until we are all through it and can be together in one room again!

I’m also really sorry I didn’t write at the beginning of the pandemic. I felt a twinge of deep deep shame when a friend told me she’d been even been contacted by a former drug dealer with a ‘supporting our customers during this difficult time’ message. In my defence, I’d like to blame my baby! I hope you know that this community has provided a lot of solace for me, and I composed about 20 newsletters in my head while tending to my small human.

But here we are, somewhere in the middle, and I have some news. My fourth album, will be released on Bella Union on October 9th, and the first single comes out today. It’s called “Dandelions/Liminal”, and it was written in New York the summer after the 2016 election, after I’d dabbled with some Buddhist philosophy on a music residency in China. It’s a happy song about co-existing with sorrow in the summer, and that’s pretty much still where I am right now.

The rest of the album was mostly written in Hong Kong in late 2017, during a precious, peaceful time that began with the Mid-Autumn moon. That story will gradually be revealed as the songs and videos and texts come out, but we all know already that a lot has changed in Hong Kong since that time. I am immensely proud to have written this album for that city, and to know a piece of my heart is there. Now I get to share a piece of my heart with you.

I should stop before I paraphrase any more 90’s lyrics, but here is the single and album pre-order. Be in touch and let me know your news.

Emmy the Great new song “Dandelions/Liminal” released on Bella Union 2020-07-07 Emma-Lee Moss

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The sounds of Himalayan winds, sacred mantras and water rippling in the holy river Ganges, invite us to “Peradam”, the transcendent new album by Soundwalk Collective with Patti Smith. The album, which features guests including Anoushka ShankarTenzin Choegal and Charlotte Gainsbourg, will be released 4th September via Bella Union Records.

Peradam takes as its entry point René Daumal’s early 1940s novel Mount Analogue: a Novel of Symbolically Authentic Non-Euclidean Adventures in Mountain Climbing, in which the French writer, critic and poet mapped a metaphysical journey to “the ultimate symbolic mountain” in search of meaning. In it, Daumal introduced the idea of the “peradam”, a rare, crystalline stone – harbouring profound truths – that is only visible to seekers on a true spiritual path. The band have shared a hypnotic video to the title track, directed by Stephan Crasneanscki and with editing and visual collage by Jenn Ruff.

Peradam arrives as “the final stone”, says Soundwalk Collective’s Stephan Crasneanscki, in The Perfect Vision, a triptych of albums that evoke and explore the sainted spaces of thought and creativity opened by the three French writers and poets. After albums devoted to Antonin Artaud (The Peyote Dance) and Arthur Rimbaud (Mummer Love), Peradam expands on “the living space”, says Smith, that Daumal left for future seekers to enter and create out of.

Daumal’s spiritual quests ranged wide and deep. Part-influenced by Rimbaud, he also identified with the Pataphysicians, followers of the avant-garde absurdist Alfred Jarry. Daumal experimented with hallucinogens to the detriment of his health, though he would later transfer his passions to the purity of work as he nurtured a fascination with Hindu philosophies and taught himself Sanskrit; Peradam features some of his translations.

While Daumal embraced the idea of self-abnegation as the key to internal awakening, he was also drawn to the syntheses of Eastern/Western thought in Greek-Armenian philosopher GI Gurdjieff’s teachings. Daumal’s greatest works include the novels A Night of Serious Drinking and Mount Analogue, which – though unfinished at the time of his death from TB at 36 in 1944 – inspired psychedelic magus Alejandro Jodorowsky’s 1973 film The Holy Mountain as well as the creative journeys undertaken by Soundwalk Collective and Patti Smith.

Peradam will be released 4th September via Bella Union

Psychic Markers

Psychic​ ​Markers​ ​–​ ​consisting​ ​of​ ​Alannah​ ​Ashworth,​ ​Lewis​ ​Baker,​ ​Steven Dove,​ ​Leon​ ​Dufficy​ ​and​ ​Luke​ ​Jarvis​ ​-​ ​are​​ ​a​ ​hodgepodge​ ​bunch​ ​made​ ​up​ ​of members​ ​of​ ​various​ ​other​ ​bands​ ​and​ ​with​ ​a​ ​geographical​ ​backdrop​ ​that stretches​ ​countries​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​counties.​ ​So​ ​it​ ​makes​ ​sense​ ​that​ ​their​ ​music would​ ​be​ ​eclectically​ ​emblematic​ ​of​ ​such​ ​sprawling​ ​backgrounds.

Their sophomore album Hardly​ ​Strangers​ ​-​ ​much​ ​like​ ​the​ ​band​ ​themselves​ ​-​ ​is​ ​an assorted​ ​affair.​ ​50’s-tinged​ ​doo-wop​ ​nestles​ ​up​ ​alongside​ ​lush cinema-influenced​ soundscapes;​ ​whilst​ ​flashes​ ​of​ ​neo-psychedelia​ ​take​ ​pop hooks​ ​and​ ​stretch​ ​them​ ​out​ ​into​ ​hypnotic​ ​and​ ​elongated​ ​jams​ ​befitting​ ​of 1970’s​ ​Germany​ ​before​ ​pushing​ ​them​ ​into​ ​further​ ​cosmic​ ​realms.

Psychic​ ​Markers​ ​are​ ​not​ ​a​ ​genre​ ​band​ ​but​ ​instead​ ​one​ ​that​ ​is​ ​driven​ ​by​ ​a collective​ ​psyche,​ ​where​ ​the​ ​rule​ ​of​ ​friendship​ ​and​ ​instinctive​ ​democracy trumps​​ ​any​ ​forced​ ​idea​ ​of​ ​aesthetic.​ ​“It’s​ ​more​ ​of​ ​an​ ​unwritten​ ​understanding between​​ ​ourselves,”​ ​Dove​ ​says,​ ​expanding​ ​on​ ​the​ ​song writing​ ​process.​ ​“If something​​ ​doesn’t​ ​feel​ ​right​ ​for​ ​the​ ​band,​ ​we​ ​lose​ ​it.”​ ​Dufficy,​ ​the​ ​primary songwriter​ ​along​ ​with​ ​Dove,​ ​echoes​ ​this,​ ​hitting​ ​home​ ​the​​ ​intuitive​ ​nature​ ​of the​ ​group.​ ​“I​ ​think​ ​we’re​ ​more​ ​of​ ​gang​ ​now,​ ​our​ ​inner​ ​psychic​​ ​link​ ​has increased.​ ​We​ ​can​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​see​ ​which​ ​road​ ​one​ ​of​ ​us​ ​is​ ​heading​ ​down​ ​and sort​ ​of​ ​meet​ ​them​ ​there.”​ ​Jarvis​ ​(bass)​ ​further​ ​emphases​ ​this​ ​too. “I’ve​ ​never​ ​really​ ​considered​ ​this​ ​to​ ​be​ ​a​ ​band​ ​in​ ​a​ ​typical​ ​sense,​ ​i.e.​ ​a​ ​group with​​ ​preconceived​ ​notions​ ​of​ ​how​ ​we​ ​should​ ​exist​ ​or​ ​project,​ ​but​ ​more​ ​like​ ​five kindred​ ​spirits,​ ​cosmic​ ​cowboys​ ​-​ ​and​ ​girl.​ ​The​ ​music​ ​and everything​ ​that​ ​surrounds​ ​it​ ​seems​ ​to​ ​come​ ​quite​ ​naturally​ ​as​ ​a​ ​result​ ​so​ ​it​ ​just becomes​ ​about​ ​pals​ ​making​ ​music,​ ​being​ ​creative​ ​and​ ​enjoying​​ ​ourselves while​ ​doing​ ​so.”

And​ ​that​ ​road​ ​that​ ​a​ ​group​ ​of​ ​cosmonauts ​ ​have​ ​embarked​ ​on​ ​has​ ​led them​ ​to​ ​this​​ ​juncture:​ ​a​ ​second​ ​album​ ​that​ ​owes​ ​as​ ​much​ ​to​ ​Joe​ ​Meek​ ​as​ ​it does​ ​Conny​ ​Plank​​ ​or​ ​to​ ​David​ ​Lynch​ ​as​ ​it​ ​does​ ​Mark​ ​Rothko​ ​or​ ​Steve​ ​Reich; an​ ​album​​ ​overflowing​ ​with​ ​ideas​ ​and​ ​ambition​ ​or,​ ​as​ ​the​ ​band​ ​say,​ ​something that​ ​is​​ ​“cohesive​ ​yet​ ​diverse.”

Yet​ ​despite​ ​the​ ​collectiveness​ ​of​ ​this​ ​record​ ​and​ ​it’s​ ​a​ ​mutual​ ​expression​ ​of​ ​a desire​ ​to​ ​simply​ ​make​ ​radiating​ ​cosmic​ ​pop​ ​music,​ ​it​ ​still​ ​retains​ ​a​ ​sense​ ​of individual​ ​personality​ ​that​ ​comes​ ​through​ ​Dove’s​ ​lyrics​ ​that​ ​waver​ ​between the​​ ​personal​ ​and​ ​the​ ​metaphorical.​ ​The​ ​sweeping,​ ​sliding​ ​and​ ​euphoric​ ​‘Fields of​​ ​Abstraction’​ ​for​ ​example,​ ​being​ ​about​ ​Dove’s​ ​personal​ ​relationship​ ​to​ ​his own​​ ​brain.​ ​“It’s​ ​about​ ​memory​ ​and​ ​how​ ​sometimes​ ​it​ ​can​ ​let​ ​us​ ​down​ ​or​ ​distort the​​ ​view​ ​of​ ​something​ ​you​ ​once​ ​saw​ ​so​ ​clearly.​ ​I​ ​find​ ​both​ ​great​ ​joy​ ​and sadness​ ​in​​ ​focussing​ ​on​ ​old​ ​memories,​ ​I’m​ ​a​ ​very​ ​nostalgic​ ​person​ ​and​ ​a fading​ ​memory​ ​is​ ​a​ ​bereavement​ ​we​ ​all​ ​have​ ​to​ ​deal​ ​with.”

It’s​ ​this​ ​realisation​ ​and​ ​lyrical​ ​expression​ ​that​ ​is​ ​arguably​ ​a​ ​blueprint​ ​for​ ​this album​ ​and​ ​a​ ​representation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​band​ ​as​ ​a​ ​whole:​ ​a​ ​group​ ​in​ ​love​ ​with​ ​the sounds​ ​and​ ​accomplishments​ ​of​ ​the​ ​past​ ​but​ ​not​ ​being​ ​so​ ​unimaginative​ ​as​ ​to trust​ ​and​ ​rely​ ​on​ ​those​ ​memories​ ​and​ ​thoughts​ ​of​ ​past​ ​glories​ ​and​ ​so​ ​instead have​ ​created​ ​a​ ​sonic​ ​hybrid​ ​that​​ ​touches​ ​upon​ ​history’s​ ​great​ ​musical achievements​ ​whilst​ ​looking​ ​firmly​ ​to​​ ​future​ ​ones.

The new single from the self titled Psychic Markers album out 29th May 2020 via Bella Union.