Posts Tagged ‘Ollie Judge’

Squid are thrilled to announce their debut album , “Bright Green Field”, already one of 2021’s most highly anticipated albums. Bright Green Field, produced by Dan Carey, will be released 7th May. It’s an album of towering scope and ambition, it is deeply considered, paced and intricately constructed. With all band members playing such a vital and equal role, this album is very much the product of five heads operating as one.

Some bands might be tempted to include previous singles on their debut – and the band already released two more in 2020 via Sludge’ and ‘Broadcaster’ – but instead Bright Green Field is completely new. This sense of limitlessness and perpetual forward motion is one of the the key ingredients that makes Squid so loved by fans and critics alike, from BBC Radio 6 Music who have A-Listed previous singles, ‘Houseplants’, ‘The Cleaner’ and ‘Match Bet’ to publications such as, The Guardian, NME, The Face, The Quietus and countless others. The band was also on the longlist for the BBC Music Sound of 2020 poll.

Bright Green Field
features field recordings of ringing church bells, tooting bees, microphones swinging from the ceiling orbiting a room of guitar amps, a distorted choir of 30 voices as well as a horn and string ensemble featuring the likes of, Emma-Jean Thackray and Lewis Evans from Black Country, New Road.

Ahead of the release of their forthcoming debut record, Bright Green Field (due May 7th via Warp Records), the Brighton, UK five-piece Squid have returned with another stellar single, a banger called “Paddling.”

While much of the material off Squid’s impending debut album was written in the studio, “Paddling” has been in their live arsenal for a while. The track leads with blaring, sci-fi synths and pulsing drums, quickening in pace; an upbeat staple that meshes the chaotic but controlled post-punk tendencies the group is known for, while introducing a more intricate facet of their technical abilities. Lyrically, it tackles the sort of dystopian horror Bright Green Field centers around, wondering if we’re all just cogs in a massive, inescapable machine. “Patient, in control/Dig holes like a mole/Patient, oars in stow/Just do what you’re told,” 

“Written from two different perspectives, ‘Paddling’ is a song about the dichotomy between simple pleasures and decadent consumerism,” say the band. “Recounting a familiar scene from The Wind in the Willows, the song reminds us that although we are humans, we are ultimately animals that are driven by both modern and primal instincts, leading to vanity and machismo around us in the everyday.”

Whilst the album title conjures up imagery of pastoral England, in reality, it’s something of a decoy that captures the band’s fondness for paradox and juxtaposition. Within the geography of Bright Green Field lies monolithic concrete buildings and dystopian visions plucked from imagined cities.   

Squid’s
music – be it agitated and discordant or groove-locked and flowing – has often been a reflection of the tumultuous world we live in and this continues that to some extent. “This album has created an imaginary cityscape,” says Ollie Judge, who writes the majority of the lyrics and plays drums. “The tracks illustrate the places, events and architecture that exist within it. Previous projects were playful and concerned with characters, whereas this project is darker and more concerned with place – the emotional depth of the music has deepened.”

These themes were further embedded and emphasised, almost serendipitously, as Judge began to read more. “Reading Douglas Coupland’s view that we’re living in the “Extreme Present” as well as Mark Fisher and Merlin Coverley’s writings on Hauntology and the slow cancellation of the future made me realise we’ve been living in a dystopian and futurist landscape for a long time.”  However, for all the innovative recording techniques, evolutionary leaps, lyrical themes, ideas and narratives that underpin the album, it’s also a joyous and emphatic record. One, that marries the uncertainties of the world with a curious sense of exploration, as it endlessly twists and turns down unpredictable avenues.

Formed in Brighton, Squid is the brainchild of Louis Borlase (Guitars & Vocals), Ollie Judge (Drums & Lead Vocals), Arthur Leadbetter (Keyboards, Strings, Percussion), Laurie Nankivell (Bass & Brass) and Anton Pearson (Guitars & Vocals).

due May 7th via Warp Records

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Brighton based band Squid are happy to be releasing a new track called “Broadcaster”. It’s one of the few tracks we actually had time to road-test before the lockdown! It’s got a real sci-fi vibe which feels pretty relevant in our increasingly dystopian surroundings. We hope you enjoy it…and how could we forget… it’s being released on vinyl with Sludge.

The Brighton rock group Squid have shared their second single of the year. It’s called “Broadcaster.” Give it a listen below.

“Lyrically the track was inspired by the visual artist Naim June Paik and his TV Garden installation,” the band’s drummer/vocalist Ollie Judge said in a statement. “I thought it blurred the lines between a dystopian and utopian vision. I imagined what it must be like living synonymously amongst nature and technology in the most literal way I could imagine, with TVs towering over me amongst forests.”

Earlier this year, Squid shared “Sludge,” which was their debut song for Warp Records. On June 26th, Squid and Warp will release a 10″ vinyl record with “Sludge” and an extended edition of “Broadcaster.”

Taken from the ‘Sludge/Broadcaster’ Limited edition 10″ Vinyl, released 26 June on WARP Records.

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One of the weird and/or fun aspects about new bands (loosely) playing into some kind of post-punk lineage is trying to locate all the through lines, piecing together the DNA that gave them their individual sound. Recently, one buzzy London-based band called Black Midi perhaps provided the greatest Rorschach test in this vein, some people hearing Talking Heads and some people hearing something as far removed as King Crimson. But another buzzy London (by way of Brighton) guitar band called Squid.

The intro rhythm — you’ve heard that before. It’s pretty similar to the tightened groove that opens LCD Soundsystem’s “Us V Them,” a callback to another band deeply indebted to late ’70s and early ’80s music and deeply committed to playing fast and loose with those influences. Ollie Judge’s squawking vocals recall early Liars. But it isn’t all filtered through a previous generation’s interpretation of bygone glory days — the synths in the beginning sound like early ’80s Prince, the melodic parts kinda like Wire, and the droning strings of the outro like Nick Cave.

None of this is meant to reduce “The Cleaner” to its touchstones. In quoting all those older artists, the young band came out with a shape-shifting epic, frenzied and twitchy at first then at times genuinely pretty or trippy. And all along the way, it gets right in your bloodstream. “So I can’t dance,” Judge yelps. But it’ll make you want to.

Sure, there’s plenty of great post-punk knocking about on the shores of the old Blighty, but Squid separate themselves with multiple lead vocalists and additional instrumentation—horns, synths, cowbell, triangle, a guiro and god knows what else. They only have a few singles to their name, but tracks like “The Dial” and “Houseplants” are the kind of nervy, spunky art punk tunes that are supremely enjoyable and memorable in both their studio and live forms. Plus, everyone loves a good singing drummer and the London via Brighton five-piece have a great one at that.

Band Members
Louis, Ollie, Anton, Arthur, Laurie,

From the forthcoming ‘Town Centre’ EP – out on Speedy Wunderground digitally on 6th September,