Posts Tagged ‘David Nance’

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Nebraska songwriter David Nance returns to Trouble In Mind Records with his fifth (proper) studio album “Staunch Honey”, his follow-up to his acclaimed 2018 album “Peaced and Slightly Pulverized”. Returning to the home-recorded magic of his early albums, “Staunch Honey” was recorded entirely to tape by Nance himself at his Omaha home with the occasional assistance from his long time live bandmates Jim Schroeder & Kevin Donohue.

Guitar man David Nance continues his prodigious output of underground heartland rock with what might be his most accessible album yet. “Staunch Honey” sounds instantly timeless, but also as fresh and unique as any other rock album that came out this year. “My Love, The Dark and I” is probably the best union of Nance’s country-rock influences and his lo-fi aesthetic, without the confrontational squeal of his “Silver Wings” cover, but with just enough of a rough-hewn, homemade feel to please fans of Honey Radar or, well, Nance’s earlier, rougher records. Normally a White Light / White Heat kinda guy, “July Sunrise” and its loping guitar lines is more The Velvet Underground, but with Nance singing like Tony Joe White instead of Lou Reed. “Learn the Curve” is a slinky, bluesy vamp, while “If the Truth Shows Up” finishes the whole thing up with the stoned-out-of-its-mind psych chug of Endless Boogie. If you ever wanted to hear one of Dickey Betts’ almost saccharinely upbeat Allman Brothers songs turned into a smokey, hazy space journey, you’ll probably want to listen to “Gentle Traitor” which starts off with the colourful, chiming guitars of Betts songs like “Blue Sky” and “Jessica,” before drifting off into the cosmos. Nance has been keeping up the good fight for years now and with Staunch Honey, he might finally win over your rock ‘n’ roll uncle. 

Many of the tunes on “Staunch Honey” feel like classics, but that’s because in Nance’s hands – they are. Not content to let the album go by without the rumble of guitar, “If The Truth Ever Shows Up” closes out the album. It’s an instrumental jam with Nance wrangling and riffing on a gut-punching guitar solo for 6-plus minutes that feels very much like the end credits to a long-lost midnight movie.

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Over the course of the past six years, Omaha, NB musician David Nance has released three full-length albums for labels Grapefruit and Ba Da Bing Records, a 7-inch, numerous cassettes, CDRs and unlicensed “cover albums”. His latest full-length is credited to the David Nance Group and features Nance alongside his recent hot-shit live band of fellow Omaha musicians. “Peaced and Slightly Pulverized’s” sounds are alternatingly tender and brusque.

The anthemic Poison with its fuzzed-out guitar riff that leans into a Crazy-Horsian guitar maelstrom and white-hot solo, to Ham Sandwich; a blisteringly frantic rant about a lunchtime torment – uncomfortable in its directness. Side one closes with the epic seven and a half minute Amethyst; an emotional odyssey with Nance and Schroeder strangling their guitars into a twin-guitar, barbed-wire duel. The album’s centerpiece is In Her Kingdom, an emotive ballad that fades into view with a plaintive guitar strum that ebbs and flows with a ris ing tide of swelling guitars, it’s riffs gilding the melody and adding flecks of gold to Nance’s tale of poverty and grace. The album closes with Prophet’s Profit’s biting commentary on false idolatry utilizing the group’s not-so-secret weaponry of Nance and Schroeder’s six-string simpatico to bring the listener home.

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David Nance lives in a world where rock has been influenced as much by This Kind of Punishment and The Pin Group as by The Velvet Underground and The Rolling Stones. Omaha’s best-kept secret, up to now known primarily to DIY tape collectors and record club subscribers, Nance welcomes all with More Than Enough, his first full-band full-length, which follows the stellar but criminally under-heard 2013 Actor’s Diary LP on Grapefruit Records, as well as a string of limited-edition, over-modulatingly intense and emotionally destructive cassette releases.

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Recorded in Los Angeles, scrapped, then re-recorded after a move back to his Omaha hometown with his wife, More Than Enough sounds like the very last record to have undergone any process longer than a few hours of recording. It’s that immediate and on fire. The recipe: (a) get a shit-hot group of musicians; (b) cut songs down to their most “on” moments, or alternately let them ride a groove into the sun; (c) capture it all on actual tape. That’s the Nance approach, and it’s as much an ode to home-recorded brilliance as it is to whoop-ass inspiring rock.