Posts Tagged ‘Tiny Engines Records’

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There’s something special about the band Wild Pink and their new album. The Brooklyn indie rock trio’s 2017 debut paired insightful, wide-eyed lyrics with heavy chords and twinkly emo tunings, spilling out about frustrations familiar to any twenty-something urbanite struggling to find a place in this mixed-up world. Buried beneath lines about smartphones and the Redskins/Cowboys NFL rivalry, the album offered a glimmer of sprawling Americana, and considering what we heard with “Lake Erie,” the band appears to continue that pursuit on the upcoming Tiny Engines album.

The track “Jewels Drossed In The Runoff” evokes the rushing swell of the crusty industrial oceanside. With anthemic guitars and chilling, crystalline synth pads, the track channels some of the biggest moments of mid-’80s heartland rock, with chords and lyrics that feel like a dead match for Tom Petty. Frontman John Ross sings about a committed lover with an earnest falsetto that can’t seem to get past doubting himself. “I grew up removed / And you have a heart like a star, you give away your best,” he sings in the track’s final moments. It’s a planetarium of spirit delivered in the most honest form imaginable.

Band Members
John Ross,
TC Brownell,
Dan Keegan,

Wild Pink “Yolk In The Fur” out 7/20/2018 on Tiny Engines Records

Wild Pink

Wild Pink have steered their meditative indie rock toward the big sky over the heartland on their new album Yolk In The Fur, which is to say that in addition to sounding like Death Cab For Cutie they also now sound like the War On Drugs. We’ve heard that creative exploration play out on two songs so far, and now we hear a third.

“Jewels Drossed In The Runoff,” a gently swaying guitar ballad with planetarium keyboards, basically skips past the Adam Granduciel worship and goes straight to the source, landing on something like slowcore Tom Petty — appropriate given that Wild Pink frontman John Ross originally hailed from Petty’s home state of Florida. For what it’s worth, Ross tells us, it was mostly inspired by his love for Cocteau Twins. He adds, “It is one of my favorite songs to play live and is partly inspired by growing up in Florida. The song is for all the great people in my life.”

Wild Pink “Yolk In The Fur” out 20th July on Tiny Engines

L.A. musician Sarah Tudzin makes fizzy, self-deprecating power pop under the moniker Illuminati Hotties. “Paying Off The Happiness,” like a few other unlikely rallying cries before it, plays off the very real, very troubling issue of financial insolvency among the millennial set with with a joyful sigh and shrug, The hook, sung breezily over some chintzy dissonance, might be the catchiest outpouring of debt-fueled anxiety since Alvvays sang about student loans in 2014.  Illuminati Hotties were The Best Band That Almost No One Saw at SXSWSarah Tudzin is the project’s mastermind…She has a malleable writing style that feels ripe with potential, and she seems comfortable doing just about anything. The album’s lead single, “(You’re Better) Than Ever,” is a surf-pop shredder by way of Courtney Barnett, but its follow-up “Cuff” is a masterful blend of heavy-soft dynamics that shows off the many sides to this project. Tudzin’s songs vacillate between humorous and cutting with ferocity.

Despite the pluralized nom de guerre, illuminati hotties is the creative outlet of Sarah Tudzin – a producer and engineer hailing from the sprawl of Los Angeles. illuminati hotties has been lighting up stages across SoCal since Fall 2016 with playfully interweaving guitar lines, relentless rhythmic momentum, and strikingly self-aware vocals.

With its chorus that swells before spilling over, “Patience” is a plea and an appreciation that demonstrates the dichotomy of virtue. It also highlights the duality of Illuminati Hotties, a playful project that balances heart-on-sleeve sentiments

At first listen, illuminati hotties is a sun-drenched, irreverent volley with the onset of adulthood, but as the listener dives deeper, they will find an earnest consideration of musical phrasing and deliberately crafted wordplay regarding the complexity of love, loss, and skateboarding. Lauded as local “tenderpunk pioneers,” illuminati hotties has perfected the blend of sweetness and ferocity, of celebration and despondency, in their debut album, Kiss Yr Frenemies.

Taken from their debut album, which will be released later Tiny Engines, new track “Cuff” is indicative of that warped journeying, the track slowly introducing itself with a hazy, foggy opening minute or so, the subtle production and half-buried vocals conjuring a sense of embedded melancholy, a drifting sadness that is soon wiped out, to some degree, as the whole thing bursts in to a bristling, raucous life you never saw coming.

Cuff” is a musical reminder that we can truly never have a band figured out. Last summer we were introduced to illuminati hotties and their sunny single “You’re Better Than Ever.” Since then the band has signed to Tiny Engines and will release Kiss Yr Frenemies on 5/11. While their first single offering was bright and a total blast, “Cuff” is more subdued; a quiet single of introspection and stunning beauty.

New York band Wild Pink released one of 2017’s strongest debut albums with their self-titled effort, but frontman John Ross isn’t ready to take a break just yet: He released an ambient solo album as Eerie Gaits last year, and now Wild Pink is already back with their second album: The band just announced that Yolk In The Fur and the opening single “Lake Eerie,” a bright alt-country single that manages to work in some of the grunge edge found on their debut album, although it definitely doesn’t focus on it. Ross said of the track, “This song is about growing up and moving on and about the struggle to not get caught up in anything that doesn’t really matter. It’s also for the Western New Yorkers in my life.”

I was a fan of this indie band’s 2017 debut, which applied mid-tempo emo dynamics to John Ross’ autobiographical storytelling songs. On the forthcoming Yolk In The Fur (out July 20), Wild Pink gets expansive, playing invigorating wide-screen synth rock that recalls Ross’ classic-rock heroes like Bruce Springsteen and Jackson Browne. This nouveau heartland rock sensibility comes across most vividly in “Lake Erie,” which will surely go down as the year’s best War On Drugs song in a year without a new War On Drugs record.

Wild Pink “Yolk In The Fur” out July 2018 on Tiny Engines Records

Wild Pink only released its self-titled debut a year and some months ago; a sensitively-drawn rock record that could get a little jagged in places. Now, the NYC trio is already back with Yolk in the Fur , with a selection of John Ross‘ songs with the lessons from a year’s experience. Turns out that change is on his mind.

“Lake Erie” certainly carries Wild Pink’s awed wonder, with Ross‘ impressionistic detail to the movement of life (“But it seems like there’s a reason for it all / Why some ancient slime crossed a line / Now there’s a war on all life on earth.”)

“This song is about growing up and moving on and about the struggle to not get caught up in anything that doesn’t really matter. It’s also for the Western New Yorkers in my life,” says Ross .

But where the band might have turned up the distortion to drive a point home before, Wild Pink leans into a softer-hard dynamic with spacious pedal steel and crisp, lively percussion. When Ross breathes his last sigh — “I thought I’d never get out” — the song expands with his exhale.

Wild Pink “Yolk In The Fur” out July 2018 on Tiny Engines

For bands in San Jose, existence itself is a political act. With almost no venues at their disposal, and a culture dictated by billion dollar corporations, passion is the only option. Formed in 2017, Awakebutstillinbed emerge from this environment screaming out for connection and meaning, their music “a vivid rendering of a life spent standing on a precipice”.
Awakebutstillinbed debut What People Call Low Self-Esteem Is Just Seeing Yourself The Way Others See You is an album about being crushed by expectations, and loaded with other people’s desires. It is untamable, and undeniable. What began as the solo project of singer/guitarist Shannon Taylor, Awakebutstillinbed are now a powerful group, part At the Drive-In, part Kim Shattuck, and (at times) part pre-Good News Modest Mouse. Explosive and honest, Taylor’s lyrics painfully, purposefully tear out the false seams and sutures that shape us in the eyes of others, revealing underneath the beautiful, beating heart of whatever it is we call the self. On paper, it might sound like familiar territory for emo, but don’t be fooled Awakebutstillinbed map out whole areas of the soul previously pushed to the shadows. Plus, they fucking rock.

The San Jose emo band’s debut sounds like various states of alarm, a big statement that leans on the raw impulses of singer and songwriter Shannon Taylor. While some albums use a spectrum or rainbow for their emotional palette, low self-esteem needs a fire code: Every moment sounds an alarm, they’re only differentiated by its state of emergency.  – Pitchfork Review (7.7)
They say the best music comes from the heart; Awakebutstillinbed’s debut album, is nothing if not a testament to this. On the solo project of Shannon Taylor, every moment is more vulnerable than the last as she lays every emotion out for the world to see. A classic cathartic, emotional, good ‘ol punk album for those who feel too much… – The Grey Estates

what people call low self​-​esteem screams out of the gate with perceptive and esoteric songs about the relationship with self and, in turn, each other, and it’s one of 2018’s first great releases. – Crossfader
Think shimmer meets aggression meets sadness meets elation meets pretty melodies you can totally scream-sing along to… – Oh My Rockness

Released January 3rd, 2018

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Despite the pluralized nom de guerre, illuminati hotties is the creative outlet of Sarah Tudzin – a producer and engineer hailing from the sprawl of Los Angeles. illuminati hotties has been lighting up stages across SoCal since Fall 2016 with playfully interweaving guitar lines, relentless rhythmic momentum, and strikingly self-aware vocals.  At first listen, illuminati hotties is a sun-drenched, irreverent volley with the onset of adulthood, but as the listener dives deeper, they will find an earnest consideration of musical phrasing and deliberately crafted wordplay regarding the complexity of love, loss, and skateboarding. Lauded as local “tenderpunk pioneers,” illuminati hotties has perfected the blend of sweetness and ferocity, of celebration and despondency, in their debut album, Kiss Yr Frenemies.

Club Night are less a supergroup and more a logical coming together; the band consist of members of various Oakland DIY-bands, who went to each other’s shows, supported one another’s project and then almost inevitably formed a band. Members of various musical backgrounds and styles, thrown together by band-leader Josh Bertram, Club Night quietly produced something cohesive and intriguing, their debut EP, Hell Ya.

The band have recently shared the video to their latest single, “Shear”. The track is a frenetic blast of angst and energy, combining the impassioned yell of Wolf Parade with the expansive ambition of Broken Social Scene. Add a claymation video with ominous nods to the illuminati and Shear becomes an exciting triumph and a fitting send off to what has been an excellent year for Club Night.

Band Members
Josh Bertram, Rebecca Lukens, Ian Tatum, Josiah Majetich, Devin Trainer

Hell Ya is out now via Tiny Engines.

Co-fronted by the ethereal Sara Bertuldo and the whispered baritone of Mathew Carroll, See Through Dresses work bits of Cocteau Twins, The Cure, and other reverby ’80s bands into their new album “Horse of the Other World”.  Its instant, urgent, and bursting at the seams with sentimental angst, “Lucy’s Arm” is a brilliant next-step…a sonic explosion of guts and glory that hits like a hammer.  Sara Bertuldo’s vocals absolutely soar, but the heavy bass line and looping guitars keep her tethered. The track sounds like an authority figure hit with a glitter bomb, a moment of levity for a person who can’t quite fully give in to it and divorce themselves from the world. 

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“Violet,” the first single from See Through Dresses’ upcoming sophomore album, comes out swinging with a towering, shimmering riff that threads itself throughout the song. Their new album, Horse Of The Other World, alludes to their shoegazier past, but most of the songs have a vibrancy and urgency that’s difficult to walk back from. “Violet” in particular is an absolute monster of a track.

Steph Knipe asks a lot of questions on Soft Spots, the new album from Adult Mom , their bedroom project-turned-indie band. Some have to do with sex (“Do you full-screen your porn? / Do you think about me as you watch her crawl across the floor?”), others with validation (“If I am good — if I am REALLY fucking good — will you validate me?”). All of them gesture towards the album’s overarching, frequently autobiographical narrative: a quest for queer truth, self-acceptance and love, a war waged against gender dysphoria and lingering trauma.

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Percolated through Knipe’s velvety alto and the band’s sunny, emo-pop palette, the aforementioned queries blossom from a highly personal dialogue into a comforting, contemplative conversation, the artist’s pain acting as a vessel for our own, regardless of gender identity. After all, the emotional hazards dotting the long, bruising path to adulthood don’t discriminate. Pain unites us all, especially in today’s uncertain times.

Adult Mom “Soft Spots” LP/CD/Cassette/Digital out 5/19/17 on Tiny Engines Records