Posts Tagged ‘The Twerps’

The Melbourne band Twerps had a solid near-decade run as a melancholic, melodic guitar-pop band. Twerps guitarist Julia Macfarlane’s current solo project, J. Macfarlane’s Reality Guest, gets stranger and cuts deeper to the heart and bone. Ta Da’s first track is a mood piece, with ample silence; it’s a signpost of Macfarlane’s experimental approach to pop and it’s a preparatory step, getting us in a proper head-space of caution and anxiety. The songs have the ecstatic optimism of exploration, working through ideas in skeletal form.

Musically think of the Raincoats’ Odyshape, the primitive and visceral sound of early rock guitar, a one-person homegrown Stereolab, melodies you dream about and try to recapture when awake, small Casio keyboards trying to play psych epics on their own.

“Ta Da” is also a sustained exploration of heartbreak, over one dissolved relationship but also the whole of humanity. It’s the sound of someone realizing a relationship has become a dreary series of cold transactions… or realizing life itself might be becoming a dreary series of cold transactions on a planet nearing its end days.

Cheerful music, yes? But it is…and invigorating, exciting, adventurous, emotional. It ends with a gorgeous ballad aiming a direct question at the universe: “Where are you, my love?”

From the album “TA DA”, available though Night School Records on vinyl, CD, and digital https://nightschoolrecords.com/produc…. Originally released through Hobbies Galore.

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It was incredibly hard not to have felt more than just a little giddy following my first couple of listens to Twerps’ sophomore record Range Anxiety. Having taken quite awhile to warm to last year’s Underlay EP, it was clearly obvious that Twerps were 100% back on form with this newest full-length album.

The Melbourne foursome’s undeniable ability to merge the catchiest of indie-pop tinted gems with forlorn feelings such as; spurned affection (‘Love at First Sight’), disengagement (‘Shoulders’) and unrequited reinvention (‘New Moves’), is evident throughout Range Anxiety.

If you want to have an album that will leave its countless harmonies  and melodies stuck in your head for days, then I urge you to find a better release this year

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Australian band Twerps is back with a brand new music video for “Love at First Sight,” a track from their latest release Range Anxiety. The video was shot, edited and directed by Twerps’ own Julia McFarlane, and features singer Martin Frawley on a blank wall with a series of changing projections overlaying his body.

Frawley sings the lyrics as he lethargically glides around, playing with the wall projections. The music video fits the song perfectly thanks to the lo-fi production and intentionally hazy vocal delivery, meshing well with the repetitive chorus. Frawley teeters on the edge of being purposefully off-key with background vocals echoing his wistful approach. The song is the second-to-last track on Range Anxiety, which was released by Merge Records in January..

Forming late 2008 around charismatic guitarist/vocalist Marty Frawley and bassist Rick Milovanovic, the Twerps have quickly risen to become one of Melbourne, Australia’s favourite pop bands. They play their own brand of warm and incredibly infectious pop, with elements of the 80’s Flying Nun sound and 90’s lo-fi. Marty’s cheeky but heartfelt songs are complemented by the crystalline guitar lines of guitarist Julia MacFarlane (ex Batrider) and the sympathetic percussion of drummer Patrick O’Neill. Twerps signed to Merge Records internationally in 2014 and released effortless eight song EP “Underlay” in August. Much anticipated second album “Range Anxiety” was released by Chapter Records for Australia/New Zealand and Merger Records for the rest of the world in January 2015

Australia bands in the spotlight today as we look at Melbourne based pop-quartet Twerps. This classic indie-pop created their first self-titled album 3 years ago. Moving ahead to the Summer of 2014, Twerps have been consistent with the soothing sounds and bittersweet melodies as they released a well-received 8 track EP “Underlay” which has been described as “songs fraught with universal, emotionally familiar sentiments”. But this was no excuse for a break, the band have quickly followed up with their second album “Range Anxiety” which was released in the UK last month. Catch Twerps this years Great Escape Festival in Brighton 14th-16th May 2015

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Twerps create cheeky, charming and touchingly direct music, that has seen them championed by BBC6 Music’s Marc Riley and taken on tour by Belle & Sebastian, Real Estate and Mac DeMarco. The bustling, fun and nostalgic animated video to Twerp’s newest single “Stranger” features a play-doh man seeking companionship which was directed by the band’s bass player, Angus Lord.
Catch Twerps this years Great Escape, 14th-16th May 2015

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From new album “Range Anxiety”,to be released 23rd Jan 2015 on Chapter Music Records. 

When Twerps got together in 2008, they’ve said they wanted to write a song like the Clean‘s“Anything Could Happen”. The Melbourne band did just that, and on their 2009 self-titled EP, the influence of the Clean and other Flying Nun artists could be heard in the paced-but-driving riffs of songs like “Little Guys”. Unfortunately, the EP wasn’t very cohesive 

“Voice” can be a nebulous term for four people, but the the band definitely has a unified point of view here. Musically, Twerps features several breezy, reverb-laced riffs, most of which could earn them an easy comparison to Real Estate— although the influence, again, likely comes from their Australia- and New Zealand-based forebears. There are also some assertive riffs, like the driving surf rock solo of “Dreamin'” or the urgent, distortion-heavy refrain of “Don’t Be Surprised”.  And, on “Who Are You”, a paced, inebriated sing-along, the band’s joined by members of their Australian rock community,

They’re tightest thematically: Every song follows a related narrative of young, conflicted love. These are all good examples of what they do so well on Twerps: excellent melodies, simple guitar lines, and simple lyrics that imply something urgent or devastating. As they’ve said in interviews, they’ve done some growing up for this album, and you can hear it, mostly in the tone of their instruments. They make those bold, doe-eyed statements, then offset them by a tinge of melancholy in their guitars, implying something more self-aware and devastating.

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new track from The Twerps’ forthcoming second album “Range Anxiety”.Range Anxiety is out Jan 23 on Chapter Music (Aus/NZ).
Pre-order the album and get “Shoulders” + first single “Back To You” via: the webpage. The low-key but top-notch indie-pop of Twerps harkens back to the 1980s, when fellow Australians the Go-Betweens and New Zealand neighbours the Chills and the Clean made waves on college radio. They’re smart and literate without trying too hard at either, and tender without ever getting whiny or overemotional. It’s classic college radio stuff done as well as anybody else today is doing it.

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Sweet sound from Melbourne Australian Jangle pop band “The TWERPS” album is available now, the band have just signed to Merge Records,

Melbourne’s Twerps have released “Back To You” b/w “Always Waiting” on limited edition 7-inch vinyl as well as digitally. The single quickly follows the August-released Underlay EP and precedes their second full-length Range Anxiety, due in January.

“Back to You” has a vibrant and lighthearted way of addressing the relationship between insecurity and desire. Singer Martin Frawley contemplates being tied down, letting the listener decide what exactly he’s tethered to. The Johann Rashid-directed music video captures Twerps and their radiant local surroundings with a romantic sensibility

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