Posts Tagged ‘Pup’

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The Tiny Desk Concert is working from home for the foreseeable future. Introducing NPR Music’s Tiny Desk (home) concerts, bringing you performances from across the country and the world. It’s the same spirit ,stripped-down sets, an intimate setting, just a different space. For PUP’s Tiny Desk (home) concert, the Toronto group refused to dial down the volume, filling Babcock’s neatly-furnished living room – complete with an Ontario pennant  and just maybe making a few enemies down the street in the process.

My neighbours hate us, and I don’t blame them, Babcock said. Volume complaints aside, that admission feels like a perfect summary of the band’s penchant for spinning stories of chaos into catchy-as-hell, shout-along songs. With bandmates Nestor Chumak, Zack Mykula and Steve Sladkowski masked to adhere to COVID safety protocol, PUP wastes no time here, immediately setting the tone with “Rot” from the group’s aptly-titled 2020 EP, “This Place Sucks A**. From there, the set spans the band’s discography, spotlighting two cuts (“Kids” and “Scorpion Hill”) from 2019’s Morbid Stuff and “Reservoir,” a track off the group’s debut.

And to NPR officemates who think you’ve escaped an earsplitting in-office set with this (home) concert, let the handmade “Ceci n’est pas une Tiny Desk” (“This is not a Tiny Desk”) sign serve as a warning: When the Tiny Desk returns to NPR HQ and the U.S.-Canada border reopens, prepare to have your workday interrupted.

The Band: Stefan Babcock: vocals, guitar Nestor Chumak: bass, vocals Zack Mykula – drums, vocals Steven Sladkowski: guitar, vocals

Set List: “Rot” “Kids” “Reservoir” “Scorpion Hill”

Another band we count as friends are Toronto’s PUP, who play a more aggressive, shout-y form of punk. Widerman credits Sum 41 guitarist Dave Baksh for giving invaluable help during Monster Truck’s early years; their 2011 EP Brown is named for the swarthy guitarist, who lent a ton of gear for its recording. While there isn’t necessarily a well-defined Canadian sound, one thing many players have in common is a focus on subtlety rather than pyrotechnics. 

“One of the things I’ve noticed with Canadian artists in different media is there’s a lot of individuality,” Wilcox says. “Everyone from Neil Young to Joni Mitchell to whoever. Partly because there’s a certain feeling of isolation in winter. I don’t know.”

“I prefer guitar players who are able to tell stories through what they play,” says PUP guitarist Steve Sladowski, who cites Mitchell and Bruce Cockburn as some of his favourite Canadian players.

“Even someone like Alex Lifeson is somehow an understated guitar player. Playing in Rush, in a power trio, he’s happy to play what needs to be there. There’s some way of playing this really technical music and really proggy but never overplaying.” This guys have great pop sensibility and a penchant for great melodies, all dressed up in a jagged suit of chaos and energy. 

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For PUP, a band whose breakout album begins with the all-time great kick off line “If this tour doesn’t kill you then I will,” the only thing worse than being trapped on tour for a year is being trapped without the possibility of touring for a year. Innumerable great young bands have seen their touring careers stalled by the pandemic, and PUP is one of them: Instead of seizing the momentum of 2019’s phenomenal Morbid Stuff with another round of shows, the Toronto punk band is trapped at home and getting their aggression out with a characteristically misanthropic EP, This Place Sucks Ass. Titled after a routine tour refrain-turned-pandemic commentary (“at this moment in time, it feels so fucking real—wherever you are, it sucks ass right now,” frontman Stefan Babcock explains), the 17-minute release compresses the band’s infectious feel-bad punk energy into five new ragers and one cover.

While the sounds might vary, one thing that unites guitar bands is the hours they spend slogging it out on Canada’s endless highways (when you calculate the distance between Canada’s big cities, it starts making a lot of sense that Tom “Life is a Highway” Cochrane is a canuck). 

Sladkowski points to two other highly aggro bands who have managed long careers in the north as examples of the creative risks bands can take in Canada

Released October 23rd, 2020

Pop music vinyl records and gramophone Royalty Free Vector

Now then, you’ll be relieved that under these abnormal circumstances it has’nt stopped a load of excellent records from being released this week, covering the usual baffling array of genres and styles. It’s here! ‘The Metrobolist’ by David Bowie, complete with Tony Visconti mix, is in on LP and CD. Will you get sent a coloured vinyl edition? David Bowie’s The Man Who Sold The World gets a 50th anniversary reissue under its original title, “Metrobolist”. Gold and white coloured vinyl are randomly inserted amongst the standard black vinyl, so hopefully you’re lucky enough to bag something extra special.
The Flaming Lips reissue ‘Transmissions From The Satellite Heart’ on a limited black and white mix coloured vinyl.

Very nice looking 5LP expanded set from Wilco for their ‘Summerteeth’ record Wilco’s “Summerteeth” turned 21 this year and gets a very handsome deluxe edition to celebrate. A box edition  with a five-LP set featuring the remastered studio album as well as the unreleased demos, alternates and outtake recordings pressed on 180-gram vinyl.. Lupin is the (almost) self-titled debut solo LP from Hippo Campus’ Jake Luppen. Really smart pop this, sounds huge but still handcrafted. Really good.

Neil Young issues a new double live album with Crazy Horse, ‘Return To Greendale’ was recorded on the 2003 tour. It’s  another fantastic live record from Neil Young & Crazy Horses from their tour supporting the Greendale album. “Return to Greendale” is the next instalment in Neil Young’s Performance Series and features a concert (audio and on film) from the historic and unique tour.  Some big ol’ riffs here.

New West Records look back at the influential early albums of Pylon, reissuing “Chomp” and “Gyrate”, as well as the lovely Pylon Box Set.

PUP release their new EP, “This Place Sucks Ass” on coloured vinyl

Noise rockers Hey Colossus return very much at full throttle with the excellent Dances / Curses on Wrong Speed Records. Full of drive, but also really quite hypnotising in its long drones. Nice double clear vinyl pressing too.

David Bowie 'Metrobolist (The Man Who Sold The World) LP

David Bowie – “Metrobolist”

November 2020 sees the 50th Anniversary of the release of David Bowie’s The Man Who Sold The World in North America. The album marks the beginning of a collaboration with guitarist Mick Ronson that would last through classic works including Hunky Dory, Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane—as well as the first in a 10-year series of indispensable albums stretching through 1980’s Scary Monsters

Originally titled Metrobolist, the album’s name was changed at the last minute to The Man Who Sold The World. The 2020 re-release of the album under its Metrobolist moniker has been remixed by original producer Tony Visconti, with the exception of the track ‘After All’ which Tony considered perfect as is, and is featured in its 2015 remaster incarnation.

The Metrobolist 50th anniversary artwork has been created by Mike Weller who was behind the historically controversial “dress” cover which Mercury Records refused to release. As with the Space Oddity 50th anniversary vinyl, as well as a 180g black vinyl edition, it will come in 2020 limited edition handwritten numbered copies on gold vinyl (# 1971 – 2020) and on white vinyl (# 1 – 1970) all randomly distributed.

Neil Young and Crazy Horse 'Return To Greendale' 2xLP

Neil Young and Crazy Horse – “Return to Greendale”

Return to Greendale is the next installment in Neil Young’s Performance Series and features a concert from the historic and unique 2003 tour supporting the release of the Neil Young with Crazy Horse album Greendale. On the 2003 tour, Neil Young and Crazy Horse were joined on stage by a large cast of singers and actors to perform the story Neil Young wrote about the small town of Greendale and how a dramatic event affects the people living there. The ten songs from the powerful original album are performed in sequence, with the cast speaking the sung words – adding to the intensity of the performance. The film of the ambitious live show captures the vibrancy of Neil Young and Crazy Horse on stage in a unique multi-media experience. It seamlessly blends together the live performance, the actors portraying each song, with the story occasionally enhanced by scenes from the Greendale – The Movie. Both the live concert film and the Inside Greendale documentary are directed by Bernard Shakey and produced by L. A. Johnson.

The Flaming Lips 'Transmissions From The Satellite Heart' LP

The Flaming Lips – Transmissions from the Satellite Heart

Transmissions from the Satellite Heart is the Flaming Lips’ sixth album, released in 1993. The Norman, Oklahoma, quartet makes modern rock that doesn’t sound like anyone else; head music, they’d have called it in psychedelia’s heyday, weird soundscapes that conjure the bizarre alternate universe on the other side of the funhouse mirror. Transmissions, their second major-label release after a long indie apprenticeship has a mellower feel than early fans might expect, with lots of acoustic guitar and dreamy interludes to shame more-era Pink Floyd, but it’s no less weird than their last two efforts. strange sounds float in and out of the mix, and Wayne Coyne’s twisted hick vocals are convincingly demented. Coyne’s lyrics tend toward a dadaist stream of consciousness with occasional forays into junk culture; this is familiar modern rock territory, but songs such as She Don’t Use Jelly, Chewin the Apple of your Eye, and Be my Head are more effective and less annoying than the would-be gonzo efforts of Frank Black and Sonic Youth because they’re catchier and less pretentious. The Flaming Lips may be transmitting to the satellites, but when all is said and done, they live in Oklahoma.

Wilco 'Summerteeth' 5xLP

Wilco – “Summerteeth” Deluxe Edition

Wilco’s third album, Summerteeth, arrived in March 1999 to glowing reviews for its daring arrangements, lush harmonies and revealing lyrics. More than 20 years later, the Chicago-based band expand one of its best with multiple collections packed with hours of unreleased studio and live recordings.

Summerteeth introduced many fan-favourite classic tracks that the band continues to play live today, including I’m Always In Love, A Shot In The Arm and Via Chicago. The 24 previously unreleased recordings that debut on the deluxe edition explore the making of the critically acclaimed album with demos No Hurry and I’ll Sing It, outtakes I’m Always In Love (Early Run Through)and Viking Dan, and alternate versions Summer Teeth (Slow Rhodes Version)and Pieholden Suite (Alternate).

Limited to 6,000 copies, the five-LP set features the remastered studio album as well as the unreleased demos, alternates and outtake recordings pressed on 180-gram vinyl. However, instead of the Colorado concert included in the CD package, the LP version contains a special, exclusive performance from early 1999 titled, An Unmitigated Disaster, a previously unreleased live in-store performance at Tower Records on March 11, 1999, just two days after the album was released. The 10-song set, which was broadcast on Chicago radio station WXRT-FM, highlights several tracks from Summerteeth (We’re Just Friends, How To Fight Loneliness and Can’t Stand It). This show is only available in the LP collection.

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Pylon – “Pylon Box”

Pylon was born in 1979 in Athens, Georgia. Throughout their brief history, they were able to create influential work that would help foster the post-punk and art-rock scene of the early 80s. Their 1979 single Cool b/w Dub has reached legendary status with Rolling Stone calling it one of the “100 Greatest Debut Singles of All Time,” and was followed by their albums Gyrate (1980) and Chomp (1983). The band would break up upon Chomp’s arrival, but their music would continue to influence genres, musicians and fans for years to come. New West Records is proud to present Pylon Box — A comprehensive look at the band that features their studio LPs GyrateandChomp, both of which have been remastered from their original tapes, the 11-song collection Extra which includes rarities and 5 previously unreleased studio and live recordings, as well as Razz Tape, Pylon’s first-ever recording: a 13-song unreleased session that pre-dates the band’s seminal Cool b/w Dub debut.

Pylon Box also Includes a hardbound, 200 page full color book featuring pieces written by the members of R.E.M., Gang of Four, Steve Albini, Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein of Sleater-Kinney, Sonic Youth, Interpol, B-52’s, Bradford Cox of Deerhunter, Mission of Burma, Calvin Johnson of Beat Happening and K Records, Anthony DeCurtis, Chris Stamey of the dB’s, Steve Wynn of the Dream Syndicate and many more. Includes an extensive essay chronicling the band’s history with interviews with the surviving members of the band as well as members of R.E.M., B-52’s, Gang of Four, Method Actors, and more. It also features never before seen images and artifacts from both the band’s personal archives as well as items now housed at the Special Collection.

Pylon 'Gyrate' LP

Pylon – “Gyrate”

Before they were a band, Pylon were art-school students at the University of Georgia: four kids invigorated by big ideas about art and creativity and society. Pylon was less a band, however, and more of an art project, which meant they had very specific goals in mind as well as an expiration date. While their time together as a band was short lived (1979-1983), Pylon had a lasting influence on the history of rock and roll. Throughout their brief history, they were able to create influential work that would help foster the post-punk and art-rock scene of the early 80s..Artists like R.E.M., Gang of Four, Sonic Youth, Sleater-Kinney, Interpol, Deerhunter and many more claim inspiration from the band.

In 1980 the band released its first record, Gyrate and began touring across the country in support of the release. The band would soon develop a following across the country and specifically in the bustling music scene in New York City. One of their earliest gigs was opening for the Gang of Four in the big apple. Following the critical acclaim of their debut release, Pylon went back into the studio. While in the studio they gleefully pulled their songs apart and put them back together in new shapes, revealing a band of self-proclaimed non-musicians who had transformed gradually but noticeably into real musicians. The resulting album, Chomp was barely off the press when Pylon were booked to open a run of dates for a hot new Irish band called U2 (after previously playing two arena shows with them in the month leading to the album release). Most bands would have jumped at the opportunity, but Pylon were skeptical. At a critical point in the life of Pylon, they opted to become a cult band rather than stretch their defining philosophy too far.

Pylon 'Chomp' LP

Pylon – “Chomp”

Before they were a band, Pylon were art-school students at the University of Georgia: four kids invigorated by big ideas about art and creativity and society. Pylon was less a band, however, and more of an art project, which meant they had very specific goals in mind as well as an expiration date. While their time together as a band was short lived (1979-1983), Pylon had a lasting influence on the history of rock and roll. Throughout their brief history, they were able to create influential work that would help foster the post-punk and art-rock scene of the early 80s..Artists like R.E.M., Gang of Four, Sonic Youth, Sleater-Kinney, Interpol, Deerhunter and many more claim inspiration from the band.

In 1980 the band released its first record, Gyrate and began touring across the country in support of the release. The band would soon develop a following across the country and specifically in the bustling music scene in New York City. One of their earliest gigs was opening for the Gang of Four in the big apple. Following the critical acclaim of their debut release, Pylon went back into the studio. While in the studio they gleefully pulled their songs apart and put them back together in new shapes, revealing a band of self-proclaimed non-musicians who had transformed gradually but noticeably into real musicians. The resulting album, Chomp was barely off the press when Pylon were booked to open a run of dates for a hot new Irish band called U2 (after previously playing two arena shows with them in the month leading to the album release). Most bands would have jumped at the opportunity, but Pylon were skeptical. At a critical point in the life of Pylon, they opted to become a cult band rather than stretch their defining philosophy too far.

“We fully intended Pylon to be an almost seasonal thing that we were gonna do for a minute and then get on with our lives,” says Curtis Crowe, drummer for the band. “But it just never went away. It still doesn’t go away. There’s a new subterranean class of kids that are coming into this kind of music, and they’re just now discovering Pylon. That blows my mind. We didn’t see that coming.”   New West Records is proud to partner with Pylon to reissue the albums “Chomp” and “Gyrate” back into the masses. Beautifully remastered from the original audio sources and pressed on vinyl for the first time in over 30 years.

PUP 'This Place Sucks Ass' LP

PupThis Place Sucks Ass

After recording their acclaimed 2019 album, Morbid Stuff, PUP was left with a handful of songs that didn’t make the final track list, largely because they were too frenetic or too unhinged. And for an album that fantasized about the world exploding, that’s saying a lot. “We usually save the really dark songs for the end of an album,” says frontman Stefan Babcock. “But we felt that Morbid Stuff was already pretty fucking dark by the time we got there.” The Toronto four-piece loved these thematic stragglers so much, though, that instead of forcing them onto the record or hiding them away forever, they decided that they deserved to stand on their own. The excluded tracks are now seeing the light via a six-song EP, This Place Sucks Ass.

For This Place Sucks Ass, however, they say it was relieving to let loose and put something into the world that values pleasure over perfection. “Our expectations are so high. Every album we make, we want it to be better than the last,” says Babcock. “But just putting out songs we like and think are fun, that’s also pretty rewarding. Taking a breather from the pressure we put on ourselves has been so positive for us.” Like all of their material,This Place Sucks Assis a document of the band PUP is – at times thoughtful and introspective and at other times wildly cathartic. And they hope that fans will take its sentiments of anger, frustration, and bitterness that run throughThis Place Sucks Ass and find collective empowerment and joy in turning them outward along with them. “Everything sucks and that’s OK, because it sucks for everybody,” says Babcock. “And we can make it a little bit better by being together in the shittiness.”

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Frank Zappa and The Mothers Of Invention – “Carnegie Hall”

Carnegie Hall is a quadruple live album on 3CD’s by Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention, It is a mono recording of the two shows given on October 11, 1971 at Carnegie Hall in New York.

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Anna Von Hausswolff – “Ceremony”

Anna von Hausswolff is a 26-year-old from Gothenburg (and daughter of CM von Hausswolff) but her music sounds like it’s dug from ancient Viking rituals. She’s an artist whose scope, ambition

and dynamics actually warrant a comparison to Kate Bus. On the sprawling Ceremony she goes from straight up pop to ethereal Drones to rural psychedelia. Arguably ‘Ceremony’s most significant ingredient is the church organ of Gothenburg’s vast Annedalkyrkan, whose pipes are featured on the album’s striking cover. It’s featured on nine of the thirteen songs on the albumincluding the eight minute centerpiece Deathbed. Think Nico’s Desert Shore as sung by Kate Bush.

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David Bowie – “Outside in Budapest”

Superb Bowie Performance From The Earthling Tour. David Bowie’s 20th studio album was originally released in February 1997 on Arista Records. Earthling showcased an electronica-influenced sound partly inspired by the industrial and drum and bass culture of the 1990s. It was the first album Bowie self-produced since 1974’s Diamond Dogs.
The Earthling Tour started on 7th June 1997 at Flughafen Blankensee in Lübeck, Germany, continuing through Europe and North America before reaching a conclusion in Buenos Aires, Argentina on 7th November 1997. On August 14, ‘97, Bowie performed at Hungary’s Student Island Festival in Budapest, where he put on a quite extraordinary show, accompanied as he was by Reeves Gabrels on guitar, Gail Ann Dorsey on bass, Zack Alford on drums and Mike Garson on keyboards. Playing just a few tracks from the new record plus a fine selection of back catalogue gems, the entire show was broadcast, both across Eastern Europe and indeed in the US too on selected FM stations. Previously unreleased this remarkable gig is now available

 

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Toronto punk darlings PUP released arguably their angriest, most fast-moving, existentially bleak and solid effort in last year’s “Morbid Stuff”. For the masochists of 2020, there’s more from where that came from when the “This Place Sucks Ass” EP, a collection of outtakes from those same sessions, spills over even more of that energy when it’s released later in October. So far, we’ve already heard some of it with the recent singles “Anaphylaxis” and their playful Grandaddy cover of “A.M. 180”, and now its latest preview in “ROT” very much lives up to the disclaimer that the tracks were cut for being too “frenetic” or “unhinged”. “Maybe I’ve been dreaming in lo-fi / Like I just can’t stop / Maybe I’ve been rotting on the inside / All alone with my negative thoughts,” Stefan Babcock’s anxieties are delightfully shrill in stereo. 

For PUP, a band whose breakout album begins with the all-time great kickoff line “If this tour doesn’t kill you then I will,” the only thing worse than being trapped on tour for a year is being trapped without the possibility of touring for a year. Innumerable great young bands have seen their touring careers stalled by the pandemic, and Pup is one of them: Instead of seizing the momentum of 2019’s phenomenal Morbid Stuff with another round of shows, the Toronto punk band is trapped at home and getting their aggression out with a characteristically misanthropic EP, This Place Sucks Ass. Titled after a routine tour refrain-turned-pandemic commentary (“at this moment in time, it feels so fucking real—wherever you are, it sucks ass right now,” frontman Stefan Babcock , the 17-minute release compresses the band’s infectious feel-bad punk energy into five new ragers and one cover.

Pup’s New EP ‘This Place Sucks Ass’ out 23rd October on Little Dipper / Rise Records.

We’re called PUP. We’re 4 dudes from Toronto. We play loud music. You’ll like it. Or maybe you won’t. Listen and love it / hate it / whatever. “This Place Sucks Ass” EP. is October 23rd. Yes, that’s a real title. Yes, it started as a joke that felt like it came true. No matter where you live or what your circumstances, this EP is about the place you are from & the place you are at now. Because both of those places suck ass. New song “Rot” out now.  You can pre-order it right now! Bundles include t-shirts, sweatpants, totes, colour your own vinyl variants and “This Place Sucks Ass” pencil crayons. The EP art was designed by our pal Brandon Lepine.

.We also have the vinyl as an animated picture disc! thisstoresucksass.com
To celebrate the EP release, we are doing our first ever livestream show on October 23rd. The show will be called “THIS STREAM SUCKS ASS – THE PUPTHEBAND LIVESTREAM EXPERIENCE” & it will be broadcast live from Sneaky Dee’s in Toronto.
Directed by Jeremy Schaulin-Rioux. 
 
We are eternally grateful for any & all support. We hope this music finds you safe, as healthy as you can be, and committed to the fight for social justice. We’ll see you out on the road as soon as it’s safe for us all to be together again!.

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These guys have great pop sensibility and a penchant for great melodies, all dressed up in a jagged suit of chaos and energy. I can’t wait to hear the rest of the EP; maybe we will be lucky enough to see a vinyl release?

releases October 23rd, 2020

Oh brother, Toronto’s finest return with the darker, maladjusted nephew of last year’s Morbid Stuff… “This Place Sucks Ass”. Including a mother of a cover of Grandaddy’s “A.M. 180” alongside five other anxious, bitter and angry classics, this record sure ain’t for mom and dad.

Our NC exclusive version of “This Place Sucks Ass” is pressed on White, Orange and Green Swirl Vinyl, in a limited edition of 600 pieces

“This Place Sucks Ass” EP. October 23rd. Yes, that’s a real title. Yes, it started as a joke that felt like it came true. No matter where you live or what your circumstances, this EP is about the place you are from & the place you are at now. Because both of those places suck ass. New song “Rot” out now. thisplacesucksass.com

The EP features three songs from the Morbid Stuff sessions, two covers, and then a brand new track that is single “Rot,” which was written and recorded this year. “Rot” features that super-charged punk / power pop sound that the band has fully made into their own, on full display with all of the chaos that this year has brought.

You can pre-order it right now! Bundles include t-shirts, sweatpants, totes, colour your own vinyl variants and “This Place Sucks Ass” pencil crayons. The EP art was designed by our pal Brandon Lepine. We also have the vinyl as an animated picture disc!.
To celebrate the EP release, we are doing our first ever livestream show on October 23rd. The show will be called “THIS STREAM SUCKS ASS – THE PUPTHEBAND LIVESTREAM EXPERIENCE” & it will be broadcast live from Sneaky Dee’s in Toronto. Directed by Jeremy Schaulin-Rioux.

We are eternally grateful for any & all support. We hope this music finds you safe, as healthy as you can be, and committed to the fight for social justice. We’ll see you out on the road as soon as it’s safe for us all to be together again!

http://

We’re called PUP. We’re 4 dudes from Toronto. We play loud music. You’ll like it. Or maybe you won’t. Listen and love it / hate it / whatever.

Releases October 23rd, 2020

It’s going to be clear to you and everyone else at the party that the Me First and the Gimme Gimmes discography could more than suffice for a day full of blowing up stuff. But in case you’re looking for some more recent bratty punk and some original songs, Pup’s newest album, 2016’s The Dream is Over, can freshen up your punk rock playlist.

The Toronto four-piece makes it look effortless as they turn songs about wanting to kill your buddies into shout-along anthems. The album title comes from a phrase the lead singer Stefan Babcock’s doctor used after Babcock actually shredded his vocal cords. So on a holiday when accidentally killing your friends is a real possibility and screaming is a must if you want to be heard, this record seems appropriate.

PUP’s ability to channel anxiety, depression, and generalized misanthropy into pummeling pop-punk hooks is an endlessly renewable resource. The band is also a good enough live act to justify the fact that half their lyrics seem to be about the exhaustion of touring. In 2019, the Canadian quartet followed up 2016 breakthrough The Dream Is Over with the equally great — and equally antisocial — Morbid Stuff. It helps that lead singer Stefan Babcock is one of punk’s great chroniclers of malcontent, even, and especially when he leans on self-deprecation: “Half the crap I say is just things I’ve stolen from the bathroom walls of shitty venues across America,” he snarls in “Full Blown Meltdown.”

PUP

Pop punk isn’t dead—it’s just evolving, and nothing showcases that better than the progression of Pup. Their self-titled album from 2013 started off like any other catchy, poppy band obsessed with group chants, which is precisely what we needed at the time. 2013 was a pretty desolate year for pop punk, with a Wonder Years album The Greatest Generationand The Story So Far’s What You Don’t See, but not much else resembling anything you’d want to listen to outside of a Warped Tour playlist. Pup were the answer to our post–Bomb the Music Industry!, pre-worry. years, changing the mold of what we thought the genre had disintegrated into.

From Pup “UP” to 2016’s The Dream Is Over, the band explored their anger, sadness, and general discontent with the direction their lives had gone. While those albums were heavy-hitters in their own right, they were made for a specific time in Pup’s life. Like their predecessors, Pup have done what all pop punk bands must eventually do: they grew up. On “Morbid Stuff”, you can see their age. The group chants are louder, harsher, more unapologetic, while their words are uncensored, confident, and sincere. They’ve embraced the uniqueness of their perspectives, and in turn created a piece of confessional art. Morbid Stuff came at a time when we’re all craving transparency and honesty, and told us it’s OK to feel like shit. It’s OK to say no. It’s OK to tell people when you care about them. It’s OK to be loud. Instead of simply dealing with the curveballs that life throws your way, this record presents the option of fighting back.

Toronto band, Pup have released a further video for the album’s title track that gives us a glimpse at their live show, but from the fan’s perspective. The new video for “Morbid Stuff” was recorded live and shot on cheap, hand-held cameras that were given out to 19 gig-goers that the band personally connected with in advance of their recent London dates. This video continues PUP’s longstanding tradition of putting their fans first, like when they asked fans to record their own version of “Free At Last” without ever even hearing the song and only knowing the lyrics and chords, or when Pup leaked the news of their latest album and new song “Kids,” via a zine sent to fans through their Little Dipper label imprint. The “Morbid Stuff” video, which premiered yesterday across the nineteen fans’ social media accounts, showcases the sweat-stained euphoria of the band’s show and once again captures the unique bond between Pup and the people that come to see them live, screaming every word.

Toronto rockers PUP released their great third album Morbid Stuff which found the band crafting their most cathartic collection of songs yet. With blazing guitars, blasting drums and the perfect amount of gang vocals, Morbid Stuff, as described by a friend, is nostalgic, sassy and it fucking rips!

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PUP is serving up a slightly different thesis on the flying insects. “Anaphylaxis” is yet another anxiety attack from the Toronto punks, this time focusing on the panic at the thought of a fatal bee sting—and the comedy of this irrational fear in retrospect.

“I got the idea for the song when I was at my partner’s cottage and her cousin got stung by a bee and his whole head started to swell up,” vocalist Stefan Babcock shared in a press statement. “His wife, although she was concerned, also thought it was pretty hilarious and started making fun of him even as they were headed to the hospital. He ended up being totally fine, but it was just funny to watch him freaking out and her just lighting him up at the same time. It reminded me of all the times I’ve started panicking for whatever reason and was convinced I was dying and the world was ending and no one would take me seriously.”

The claymation video for the track, created by Callum Scott-Dyson, is a pretty graphic depiction (well, it’s pretty tame in relation to the band’s live action videos) of the worst case scenario envisioned by the song’s narrator, pairing the song’s searing riffs and intense vocals with body horror imagery.

“Anaphylaxis” – New Song and Video! Hypochondria, paranoia, hallucinations, guitars that sound like bees! This song’s got it all!

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Taking the piss of Halloween themed TV specials, Toronto’s Pup present “Growing Up Ghouls”, aka their new visuals for ‘Morbid Stuff’ fave ‘See You At Your Funeral’.

Titled “Self Care: A Horror Story”, it follows different lols and spooky themed tricks to stop you from feeling heartbroken, including to exercise (your demons) and achieving inner peace. Easy, eh?

Taken from their third record ‘Morbid Stuff’, when we spoke to them back in April about the album, frontman Stefan Babcock explained of its origins: “I was bored as fuck, sitting around thinking about all this morbid stuff. Like if anyone I’ve slept with is dead and I got stuck on death and dying and obsessive thoughts that won’t let up […] I think that’s part of growing up and becoming more mature, realising that it’s just not gonna fucking work out. It’s just not going to. Being able to let go, for better or worse, makes it become a bit easier with each passing year.”