Posts Tagged ‘Toronto’

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Toronto punk darlings PUP released arguably their angriest, most fast-moving, existentially bleak and solid effort in last year’s “Morbid Stuff”. For the masochists of 2020, there’s more from where that came from when the “This Place Sucks Ass” EP, a collection of outtakes from those same sessions, spills over even more of that energy when it’s released later in October. So far, we’ve already heard some of it with the recent singles “Anaphylaxis” and their playful Grandaddy cover of “A.M. 180”, and now its latest preview in “ROT” very much lives up to the disclaimer that the tracks were cut for being too “frenetic” or “unhinged”. “Maybe I’ve been dreaming in lo-fi / Like I just can’t stop / Maybe I’ve been rotting on the inside / All alone with my negative thoughts,” Stefan Babcock’s anxieties are delightfully shrill in stereo. 

For PUP, a band whose breakout album begins with the all-time great kickoff line “If this tour doesn’t kill you then I will,” the only thing worse than being trapped on tour for a year is being trapped without the possibility of touring for a year. Innumerable great young bands have seen their touring careers stalled by the pandemic, and Pup is one of them: Instead of seizing the momentum of 2019’s phenomenal Morbid Stuff with another round of shows, the Toronto punk band is trapped at home and getting their aggression out with a characteristically misanthropic EP, This Place Sucks Ass. Titled after a routine tour refrain-turned-pandemic commentary (“at this moment in time, it feels so fucking real—wherever you are, it sucks ass right now,” frontman Stefan Babcock , the 17-minute release compresses the band’s infectious feel-bad punk energy into five new ragers and one cover.

Pup’s New EP ‘This Place Sucks Ass’ out 23rd October on Little Dipper / Rise Records.

We’re called PUP. We’re 4 dudes from Toronto. We play loud music. You’ll like it. Or maybe you won’t. Listen and love it / hate it / whatever. “This Place Sucks Ass” EP. is October 23rd. Yes, that’s a real title. Yes, it started as a joke that felt like it came true. No matter where you live or what your circumstances, this EP is about the place you are from & the place you are at now. Because both of those places suck ass. New song “Rot” out now.  You can pre-order it right now! Bundles include t-shirts, sweatpants, totes, colour your own vinyl variants and “This Place Sucks Ass” pencil crayons. The EP art was designed by our pal Brandon Lepine.

.We also have the vinyl as an animated picture disc! thisstoresucksass.com
To celebrate the EP release, we are doing our first ever livestream show on October 23rd. The show will be called “THIS STREAM SUCKS ASS – THE PUPTHEBAND LIVESTREAM EXPERIENCE” & it will be broadcast live from Sneaky Dee’s in Toronto.
Directed by Jeremy Schaulin-Rioux. 
 
We are eternally grateful for any & all support. We hope this music finds you safe, as healthy as you can be, and committed to the fight for social justice. We’ll see you out on the road as soon as it’s safe for us all to be together again!.

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These guys have great pop sensibility and a penchant for great melodies, all dressed up in a jagged suit of chaos and energy. I can’t wait to hear the rest of the EP; maybe we will be lucky enough to see a vinyl release?

releases October 23rd, 2020

The Weather Station – project of Tamara Lindeman – marks her bold return with a new single “Robber”, featured here on a limited edition 7 inch, together with B-side “Better Now”, which is exclusive to this vinyl single. The 7 inch is out now on Fat Possum Records and Outside Music.

Recorded in at Canterbury Studios in Toronto in Spring 2019. Featuring musicians Kieran Adams, Philippe Melanson, Marcus Paquin, Johnny Spence, Brodie West, Ben Whiteley, and Tamara Lindeman.

The first music from The Weather Station since the critically acclaimed S/T album in 2017, Robber marks a bold shift in sound and tone for songwriter Tamara Lindeman. With jagged saxophone and percussive complexity, the track builds slowly over the course of five minutes, see-sawing between order and chaos.

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“I think in my life I’ve been pretty naive, always tried to see the good in everyone (still do), always tried to make do with what is and not think of what can’t be (still do),” says Lindeman. “But those attitudes are dangerous when applied at a societal level, especially at this moment in time. I think we’re all in denial a bit, about where we are, and what is happening, because it’s easier on some level, easier to try and make do with what’s missing than to see what’s missing. I think it’s hard to believe in the robber, hard to even see the robber; it’s easier to try and make love to or glamourize the robber. It hurts too much otherwise. To put it straight; there are real human people who are literally robbing us and all future generations of all of everything that matters, right now. But we literally can’t see that as a society, because for one thing we’ve been taught not to value what is taken, and for another because we’ve been taught to glamourize and love the taker. We love to love the taker. We don’t know how to see the victim of the taking.” 

releases October 16th, 2020

Written by Tamara Lindeman

Oh brother, Toronto’s finest return with the darker, maladjusted nephew of last year’s Morbid Stuff… “This Place Sucks Ass”. Including a mother of a cover of Grandaddy’s “A.M. 180” alongside five other anxious, bitter and angry classics, this record sure ain’t for mom and dad.

Our NC exclusive version of “This Place Sucks Ass” is pressed on White, Orange and Green Swirl Vinyl, in a limited edition of 600 pieces

“This Place Sucks Ass” EP. October 23rd. Yes, that’s a real title. Yes, it started as a joke that felt like it came true. No matter where you live or what your circumstances, this EP is about the place you are from & the place you are at now. Because both of those places suck ass. New song “Rot” out now. thisplacesucksass.com

The EP features three songs from the Morbid Stuff sessions, two covers, and then a brand new track that is single “Rot,” which was written and recorded this year. “Rot” features that super-charged punk / power pop sound that the band has fully made into their own, on full display with all of the chaos that this year has brought.

You can pre-order it right now! Bundles include t-shirts, sweatpants, totes, colour your own vinyl variants and “This Place Sucks Ass” pencil crayons. The EP art was designed by our pal Brandon Lepine. We also have the vinyl as an animated picture disc!.
To celebrate the EP release, we are doing our first ever livestream show on October 23rd. The show will be called “THIS STREAM SUCKS ASS – THE PUPTHEBAND LIVESTREAM EXPERIENCE” & it will be broadcast live from Sneaky Dee’s in Toronto. Directed by Jeremy Schaulin-Rioux.

We are eternally grateful for any & all support. We hope this music finds you safe, as healthy as you can be, and committed to the fight for social justice. We’ll see you out on the road as soon as it’s safe for us all to be together again!

http://

We’re called PUP. We’re 4 dudes from Toronto. We play loud music. You’ll like it. Or maybe you won’t. Listen and love it / hate it / whatever.

Releases October 23rd, 2020

Hannah Georgas has a seemingly endless capacity for crafting textured pop songs. Since her debut, the Toronto-based musician has won numerous awards and racked up multiple nominations, including four JUNO nods, for everything from Best New Artist to Songwriter of the Year.

Masterfully produced by the National’s Aaron Dessner, this has all the hallmarks of a breakthrough album, as melding electronics and acoustics frolic about Hannah’s spellbinding vocals.

The eagerly anticipated follow-up production to the work that Dessner did on Taylor Swift’s ‘Folklore’, ‘all that emotion’ comprises deeply personal songs reckoning with the past, set in a warm, enveloping sound world with lyrical themes of change and resilience. for fans of Eve Owen, Feist, Phoebe Bridgers, Daughter and the National. “… sparse, staggering… [Aaron Dessner’s] immersive production, including layered keyboards and twinkling harmonics, pairs perfectly with her elegant voice” – uncut.

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we’re equally enamoured with Hannah Georgas’ soon-to-be-breakthrough fourth album. with studio controls helmed by the National’s Aaron Dessner, who recently gave Taylor Swift’s latest album an extra shot of pizzazz, delicate acoustic instrumentation nuzzles up to magical electronics as they bear witness to Hannah’s emotionally charged vocal performance.

Released September 4th, 2020

With a name that sounds like a remote village in Sweden, Westelaken are actually a quartet from Toronto, Ontario. Having first emerged back in 2018, with their self-titled debut, the band have had a productive 2020, releasing a split-EP with fellow Torontonians Hobby, as well as one of their own, The Pool of Blood. While that record only arrived last month, the band have wasted no time in following up with their most impressive step to date, brand-new album, The Golden Days are Hard, ten songs that show both the variety and quality of Westelaken’s songwriting.

In some ways, Westelaken could be pinned as an alt-country band, yet they’re not one that fall neatly into any particular box. Across the ten tracks they span influences and genres, from the Neutral Milk Hotel-like opening track, The January Song, through to the title track, a 10-minute opus, which combines the emotional vocals of Daniel Johnston with the bar-room balladry of Kyle Craft. Lyrically too, The Golden Days are Hard is a record that explores the layered emotions of modern living, an album laced with fear, resignation and just a touch of hope, it muses on topics of death, friendship, and finding the kindness that’s still left in humanity. While it could have been a heavy record, The Golden Days are Hard manages to portray a brightness that’s beyond its themes, it sounds like a bold next step, from a band whose talent could take them anywhere.

here’s an album what’s got ten types of songs.
The January Song, that’s a country-lobster city-lobster type song.
The April Song, dying type of song.
Grace, that’s a dying and living type song.
Mercy, “milk-of-human-kindness”, that’s an eye-of-the-dog, three-types-of-souls type song.
The Pool of Blood is a two paths type of song and The August Song is a one path type of song.
White Lichen, that’s a “you break it you buy it” type song.
The October Song, that’s a “you bought a ghost story and there are no refunds” type song.
Ghosts Explode, that’s a living and dying and worship the sun type song.
The Golden Days are Hard, now that’s a you-know-me-better-than-I-know-myself type of reckoning type song.

there are several additional type songs that these ten pick up here and there like stray radio signals ricocheting off street lamps and open palms and little rocks collected between the sidewalk and the yard. feel free to take note of ’em but a comprehensive list won’t be much more useful than the one we’ve got here anyhow.

Westelaken is
Alex Baigent – electric bass, upright bass, synth on track 1, backing vocals (all over the place but most prominently in tracks 1 and 9)
Rob McLay – percussion, synth on track 10, backing vocals (including harmonies on tracks 1 and 8)
Jordan Seccareccia – guitars, vocals
Lucas Temor – piano, banjo, backing vocals
with
Paul Vroom – “organ” on track 3, backing vocals
Rachel Bellone – vocals on track 3
and Slurry (Rachel Bellone, Tago Mago, Patrick McKenna, Steven Lourenco) on group vocals
Released August 21st, 2020

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Dana Gavanski has had something of a break-out year in 2020, her debut, Dana Gavanski has had something of a break-out year in 2020, her debut, Yesterday Is Gone, drew widespread acclaim following its release back in March. By all rights, Dana should currently be touring the album far and wide, however with those plans now on hold until 2021, she is finding new ways to share her music with the world. Her latest project is a brand new covers EP, “Wind Songs”, due out next month, and this week Dana has shared the latest single from it, her cover of Chic’s track, At Last I Am Free.

This period of enforced isolation came at a particularly odd time for Dana, not only was it meant to be a triumphant moment, marking her album’s release, it also came shortly after relocating to London. Channelling this isolation into something positive, “Wind Songs” arrives as a comforting draft of familiarity, by tapping into some of her favourite songs, Dana taps into a wider love of music, and its ability to root us. Take, At Last I Am Free, it is a track Dana only discovered in the last year, yet takes a special place with her, not least for Robert Wyatt’s beautifully odd rendition of the song which, “blows my mind, with his bizarre but amazing vocals and arrangement: that soft and gentle mellotron flute that pushes the song along coupled with his shrill wizardly voice“. Dana’s own take is led by her crystalline vocal, shimmering atop a warble of electronic keys and pulses of rhythmic piano. Wind Songs feels like a beautiful aside, a look at the songs that made Dana Gavanski the fascinating musician she is, and hint at just how much more there is still to come from her.

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Dana Gavanski is a singer/songwriter currently residing in London.

“Wind Songs” is out August 14th via Full Time Hobby /Flemish Eye / Ba Da Bing Records.

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Toronto indie-punk trio Tough Age have shared their new album “Which Way Am I?” ,via Mint Records, following singles “My Life’s a Joke & I’m Throwing it Away,” and “Repose.” Which Way Am I? is the follow-up to 2017’s Shame. Taking cues from Flying Nun indie-pop and speedy ’80s punk, “My Life’s a Joke & I’m Throwing it Away” is the sound of melancholy whiplash. It’s part happy-go-lucky breeziness and part painful self-destruction, and either way, it’ll get you all riled up.

Like most of their crate-digging contemporaries, the new record explores all kinds of new directions, experimenting in different areas of post-punk while implicitly nodding to the pocket-sized punk of Dirtnap Records .

The first single the group is called “Repose,” and while it is one of the record’s sleepier cuts, it’s by no means tame. Clark takes on vocals for this song—as she does with many of tracks—before the five-minute track gives way to a sprawling John Dwyer–like guitar odyssey. “‘Repose’ is me trying to write a song about peaceful things after all of my misery songs on the previous record and 7″,” she shares. “I had mixed success in achieving my goal. I always write the melody first and then I decide what I want the song to be about, and then I write the words (sometimes words slip in during the melody part and then I have to write around them). To me, ‘Repose’ sounded like a calm and solitary night, so everything in that song happens at night.”

“I wrote the music for ‘Repose’ one morning when I should have already left for work,” Samson adds. “It came very quickly (but not quickly enough to avoid being late), but didn’t feel like something I could write a melody for. We practiced the song without Penny singing, so the first time we heard her vocals were live in the studio as she recorded them, and Jesse and I both were stunned. It felt like a real left turn for Penny, and I think shows the depths of talent she sort of just tucks away and dishes out when she feels you’ve earned a piece of it.”

Tough Age“My Life’s a Joke & I’m Throwing it Away” From the album ‘Which Way Am I?’ out on Mint Records released on August 7th, 2020

It’s going to be clear to you and everyone else at the party that the Me First and the Gimme Gimmes discography could more than suffice for a day full of blowing up stuff. But in case you’re looking for some more recent bratty punk and some original songs, Pup’s newest album, 2016’s The Dream is Over, can freshen up your punk rock playlist.

The Toronto four-piece makes it look effortless as they turn songs about wanting to kill your buddies into shout-along anthems. The album title comes from a phrase the lead singer Stefan Babcock’s doctor used after Babcock actually shredded his vocal cords. So on a holiday when accidentally killing your friends is a real possibility and screaming is a must if you want to be heard, this record seems appropriate.

PUP’s ability to channel anxiety, depression, and generalized misanthropy into pummeling pop-punk hooks is an endlessly renewable resource. The band is also a good enough live act to justify the fact that half their lyrics seem to be about the exhaustion of touring. In 2019, the Canadian quartet followed up 2016 breakthrough The Dream Is Over with the equally great — and equally antisocial — Morbid Stuff. It helps that lead singer Stefan Babcock is one of punk’s great chroniclers of malcontent, even, and especially when he leans on self-deprecation: “Half the crap I say is just things I’ve stolen from the bathroom walls of shitty venues across America,” he snarls in “Full Blown Meltdown.”

Jaunt

For the past six years, Toronto’s experimental pop mutineers, Jaunt, have been working on and anticipating the release of their first album, All In One. The band, which features several of the city’s well-avowed musicians, created a richly imagined, fully developed project which is emblematic of Jaunt’s realized sound and spirit — a kind of bright generativeness, which came from a wide rolodex of influences, pleasantly ranging from hip-hop to new-age.

With two EPs under their belts over the past four years, Jaunt‘s “All In One” the Toronto experimental pop band’s first full-length — is the fruit of years of labour and it shows in the tightness and completeness of each track.
With the help of co-producer Alex Sowinski of BADBADNOTGOOD, the band are united in their ability to create so many moving parts and countermelodies while maintaining focus on one lead expression throughout each track. Jaunt’s ability to replace the hegemonic idea of lead guitar with a variety of acoustic piano licks is refreshing and allows the guitars to shine in a more rhythmic role.

This move can be tricky, but Jaunt introduce subtle hooks that keep the listener up to speed with the progressions of each composition, like in second track “Nostalgia for the Present Moment,” which features catchy, cutting piano melodies throughout the composition. The harsh upper register of an old piano dangles over the vocal melodies in contrast to the smoothly chorused synths that melt to fill the spaces in-between.

Our debut album ‘All in One’ is out everywhere today! We’re beyond thankful for everyone who helped shape the record in some way or another over the last few years. Despite the strange moment we’re currently collectively experiencing, it feels important for us to release this music now. It was a labour of love, and I feel the music reflects a sense of optimism and positivity that’s good for all of us!

Thanks for being here,
The Band:
Pat, Caitlin, Daniel, Duncan, Nick & Tom

Two dollars from each record purchased will be given to Black Women in Motion, a “Toronto-based, youth-led organization that empowers and supports the advancement of Black woman and survivors of sexual violence.” Jaunt will match all proceeds/gross sales up to $5000 CAD.

The Debut Full-Length Record from the Toronto Experimental Pop Group Jaunt. On Exclusive Light Blue Vinyl