Posts Tagged ‘Kenney Jones’

Released this day May 24th, 1968: The Small Faces third and final studio album “Ogden’s Nutgone Flake!” Watch this one time only Small Faces theatrical performance of this amazing concept album on the BBC’s Colour Me Pop . Songs featured: “Song of a Baker”, “Happiness Stan”, “Rollin’ Over”, “The Hungry Intruder”, “The Journey”, “Mad John” and “Happydaystoytown”, narrated by ringmaster Stanley Unwin!.

Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake is the third (and final) studio album and the first concept album by English rock band Small Faces their Ogdens’LP peaked at number one on the UK Album Charts on June 29th, ​where it remained for a total of six weeks. Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake only reached No. 159 in the US.

Widely regarded as a classic album, and featured an innovative round cover, the first of its kind, designed to resemble an antique tobacco tin. The title and the design of the distinctive packaging was a parody of Ogden’s Nut-brown Flake​, a brand of tobacco that was produced in Liverpool from 1899 on wards by Thomas Ogden.

The two-act concept album consisted of six original songs on side one and a whimsical psychedelic fairy tale on side two relating the adventures of “Happiness Stan” and his need to find out where the moon went when it waned. It was narrated by Stanley Unwin, after original plans to have Spike Milligan narrate the album went awry when he turned them down.

Critics were enthusiastic, and the album sold well, but the band were confronted by the practical problem that they had created a studio masterpiece which was virtually impossible to recreate on the road.

Because of the album’s complexities, it was never performed live. It was performed as a whole once on the BBC’s television programme “Colour Me Pop” on Friday 21st June 1968.

​Although the band mimed to the studio recordings, their microphones were left on to capture ad libs.

Find more fab Ogdens’ Nutgone Flake facts at https://www.ronnielane.com/small-faces-ogdens-nut-gone-flak…

The Small Faces on the UK TV Program ‘Colour Me Pop’ in 1968.

Set List: 01. Song Of A Baker 02. Happiness Stan 03. Rollin’ Over 04. The Hungry Intruder 05. The Journey 06. Mad John 07. Happydaystoytown From 1968.

The Small Faces set is a mix of live performance, studio material and video. The centrepiece is the performance of songs from Ogden’s Nutgone Flake, complete with appearance from Stanley Unwin.

Small Faces Ogdens 1968 Image credit Gered Mankowitz

Pete Townshend’s “Empty Glass” Turns 40 years old, In 1980, the Who guitarist’s cup overflowed as the finest solo outing of his career. Although a true solo album from The Who’s wunderkind might have been eagerly anticipated at the time, Empty Glass–Pete Townshend’s first fully fleshed out album outside the boundaries of his band–still begs the question of why he didn’t opt to record these songs with the Who.

The album was written and recorded between 1978 and 1980, when activity with the Who had started to pick up again, and Townshend found himself having to write for both his solo project and his band. After all, Face Dances, the album the group released shortly thereafter, was, by all estimations, an inferior effort, widely derided as one of the weakest releases of the Who’s career. Roger Daltrey himself claimed he was disappointed that Townshend denied the group the opportunity to take a shot at Empty Glass and make it a masterpiece the band could claim as its own.

Some could consider the singer’s resentment a matter of professional jealousy. If so, it’s easily dismissed. Where Townshend’s first nominal effort on his own, “Who Came First”, was essentially a grab bag of demos and solo sketches, Empty Glass is a masterpiece even by the Who’s exacting standards.

The album title alludes to Townshend’s eternal search for spiritual salvation, particularly at a time where he was beset by an array of issues that had all but consumed him — among them, alcoholism, substance abuse, marital difficulties, and the death of his friend and bandmate Keith Moon two years before. Symbolically, “Empty Glass” refers to an analogy that compares a bar patron passing a bartender an “empty glass” in hopes it will be filled, and a seeker of spiritual redemption approaching God with an open heart, looking for the solace only the Almighty can provide. Townshend was finding further inspiration in the works of a Persian poet named Hafez, who drew the musician’s interest in the wake of  his fascination with his personal guru, Meher Baba.

Indeed, the songs offered such a sense of reflection and rumination, it’s hard to imagine Empty Glass being delivered from anything other than his personal perspective. The song that emerged as the album’s initial hit, “Rough Boys,” bows to Townshend’s unresolved sexual ambiguity. Although he dedicated it to his children Emma and Minta, it made more sense as a shout-out to the Sex Pistols who, at the time, represented punk’s brooding, blistering upending of traditional rock norms. Years later, Townshend himself alluded to its alleged homosexual references, noting that he knew members of the gay community but was not gay himself. Given that some saw the song as a coming out of sorts a decidedly wrong assumption, Townshend assured them — it would have been an awkward choice for the macho Daltrey to voice. Nevertheless, The Who did eventually include it in their live sets, a wise choice considering that it ranked among their strongest contemporary material at the time. It also hit America in the top ten, the only Townshend solo song ever to achieve that distinction.

The rest of the album is similarly introspective. “Let My Love Open the Door,” the second single from the album, made its way up the charts, although both Townshend and his management allegedly expressed some misgivings about the song. A third single, the similarly philosophical “A Little Is Enough,” which Townshend acknowledged was his bow to the Kinks’ Ray Davies, failed to make any impact at all, although Townshend considered it a better bid for chart success than the aforementioned “Let My Love Open the Door.”

While several songs could have been compelling candidates for inclusion on a new Who album — “And I Moved,” “Empty Glass,” “Gonna Get Ya,” “A Little Is Enough,” and “I Am an Animal” would have been fine fits for Daltrey’s vocals — Townshend surrounded himself with an able support cast. Producer Chris Thomas, best known for his work with the Pretenders, Procol Harum, Paul McCartney, Elton John and Pink Floyd, helped manage his client’s blend of pomp and poignancy, while four different drummers — recent Who recruit Kenney Jones, all-star session man Simon Phillips, Big Country’s Mark Brezicki and James Asher — as well as the Who’s erstwhile keyboardist John “Rabbit” Bundrick, Medicine Head’s Peter Hope-Evans on harp, and another Big Country stalwart, bassist Tony Butler provided the instrumental underpinnings.

Townshend once claimed he wanted Todd Rundgren to oversee the proceedings, but changed his mind, fearing Rundgren’s abilities as a singer and guitarist would steal the album’s focus.

Regardless, Empty Glass still ranks as the best individual effort of Townshend’s career and a worthy companion piece to his Who resume. In this case, the glass was more than half full.

Image result for the who in 1979

Following Keith Moon’s death in September 1978, The Who decided to continue as band, recruiting former Small Faces drummer Kenney Jones; keyboardist John “Rabbit” Bundrick was also added to the line-up for live performances, adding another element to the band’s sound.  A horn section was introduced to the band’s act for the first time around this time. It would be retained through 1980. The horn section also allowed numbers like “5:15” and “Drowned” (now sung by Townshend) to be reintroduced to the act. Meanwhile, 1979 shows are known among Who fans for new material that Townshend introduced on some nights during jams,  The tour supported their 1978 album “Who Are You”,

The Who performed at the Chicago Amphitheater in Chicago, Illinois on December. 8th, 1979,
The version of “How Can You Do It Alone” from the Face Dances reissue also comes from the Chicago show.
“5:15”, “My Wife”, “Music Must Change”, and “Pinball Wizard” from the Thirty Years of Maximum R&B Live video and DVD come from the same Chicago show.

The concert was broadcast live to several local movie theaters. The general consensus was that this show was the
best on the 1979 tour. The show was visually stunning. Many times Pete Townshend or Roger Daltrey would move to the front of the stage and direct the cameraman to focus in close, then unleash a mic twirl or scissors kick for the hungry crowd.

Backstage Roger asks us if we liked the show with a devious smile, knowing full well how great it was for the band
and crowd alike”. ~ The Who Concert File book/Joe McMichaels;Jack Lyons.

The Chicago Tribune wrote: “… it is the spirit The Who brings to its performance that makes it so special. Like the title of its current movie, “The Kids Are Alright,” The Who is alright and more; and though no longer “kids” in terms of the calendar, Daltrey and Townshend in particular reflect a genuine love for rock and roll, with a kid like enthusiasm which has nothing to do with age. Twirling the microphone on its cord, running in place to the beat, Daltrey throws himself into the proceedings with a joy that’s not only convincing, but catching; Townshend, meanwhile, lopes and lur-ches around the stage, his windmilIng arm crashing out heavy rock chords. The Who’s own energy output is just as devastating on a more human level.

Daltrey and Townshend come across like cheerleaders for rock and roll. If the act is, when It comes to the seeming affection for the music and the transcendent moments that rock at its best can offer, just that – an act- really doesn’t matter”.

The three-disc version of The Who biographical film “Amazing Journey: The Story of The Who” includes the majority of the band’s show of 8th December at the International Amphitheatre in Chicago.

Roger Daltrey: Harmonica, Vocals, John Entwistle: Vocals, Bass, Kenney Jones: Drums, Pete Townshend: Vocals, Guitar
John Bundrick: Keyboards,Reg Brooks: Trombone, Howie Casey: Saxofone, Dave Caswell: Brass Section

Setlist:
Substitute,I Can’t Explain,Baba O’Riley,The Punk And The Godfather,My Wife,Sister Disco,Behind Blue Eyes,Music Must Change,Drowned,Who Are You,5.15,Pinball Wizard,See Me Feel Me,Long Live Rock,My Generation,I Can See For Miles,Sparks,Won’t Get Fooled Again

Encore:
The Real Me, Dancing In The Streets, Dance It Away, Young Man Blues, Roadrunner, Big Boss Man, How Can You Do It Alone

Released in June 1967 the same month as the Beatles’ ‘Sgt Pepper’, ‘Small Faces’ is the band’s first album for Immediate Records, recorded at IBC and Olympic Studios. With lead vocals shared between three band members it has been described as their first “grown-up” record and a “neglected gem” which saw them develop a more fully-formed sound.

The Small Faces were Mod to the core, but could also play instruments. The band members were lead singer/guitarist Steve Marriott, bassist Ronnie (“Plonk”) Lane, drummer Kenney Jones, and organist Ian McLagan (who replaced Jimmy Winston early on). All four stood under 5 feet 5 inches tall (Eric Clapton, upon meeting them for the first time, said they all looked like little “haw-bits”). Their short stature, mischievousness, and stylish Carnaby Street threads made them the most eye-catching band in England for a time,

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Two extraordinary Small Faces release from Immediate Records albums were requested by Sainsburys as exclusive coloured vinyl editions. Released 1st June and limited to 2,500 and in every UK Sainsbury’s that stocks vinyl. Ogdens‘ is stereo, Small Faces mono. The last five years have seen a massive programme of tape recovery and upgrading with the full co-operation and endorsement of both surviving band members. Kenney Jones has given access to his personal tape archive and many of the band’s original master tapes and session multi-tracks, previously lost for over forty years, have been discovered and re-mastered. It is thus now possible to present the Small Faces’ recordings sounding better than at any time since the 1960s. The Re-Masters series also presents a host of newly discovered tracks and alternative versions, alongside original artwork, photos, rare publicity material and memorabilia with comprehensive new sleeve-notes based around band interviews.

One of Britain’s most influential bands of the Sixties and a major influence on the new wave of Britpop bands, the Small Faces hit their creative and commercial highpoint with their psychedelic concept album Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake. Released in May ‘68. Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flakeis considered a classic by “those in the know,” but often overlooked when classic rock albums are bandied.

Ogdens’ was the first record released in a round sleeve, designed to resemble an old tobacco tin, and the name parodies an 1899 brand of tobacco. The sleeve unfolds to four circles with moody black-and-white pics of the band members by famous photographer Gered Mankowitz . Musically, Ogdens is equally mind-blasting. After the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper, Ogdens’ was the first “concept album,” preceding both S.F. Sorrow by the Pretty Things and The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society by several months. The second side is a Ronnie Lane-inspired musical fairy tale about “Happiness Stan,” who goes on a quest, assisted by a friendly fly, to find the other half of the “dangly” moon. Linking various musical snips is daft narration by English comic Stanley Unwin, who combined the Small’s cockney slang with his own nonsensical “Unwinese” speak

A bona fide classic of the late Sixties, Ogdens’ was released on the famous Immediate label in the summer of 1968 and went straight to the number one spot in the UK album chart, remaining there for six weeks. A heady blend of cockney music-hall humour, tough rock numbers, blues and psychedelia, it spawned two of the group’s biggest hit singles in Afterglow (Of Your Love) and Lazy Sunday.

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The six tracks which made up side two of the original LP are introduced by Stanley Unwin, one of Britain’s most popular comedians of the day, renowned for his inventive use of English.

The fourteen bonus tracks are highlights from the group’s time with Immediate Records from 1967 to 1969.

As well as hit singles such as Itchycoo Park, Here Come The Nice and The Universal, these include live recordings of Tin Soldier and their 1966 Decca number one single All Or Nothing, plus their memorable duet with label mate P.P. Arnold.

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The Small Faces : Steve Marriott on Vocals and Guitar, Ronnie Lane on Bass, Kenney Jones on Drums and Ian McLagan on Wurlitzer Piano and Hammond Organ were rogues and rounders,

The Small Faces’ third album arrived in 1968, just as every other rock band was getting ambitious. ‘Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake’ is no different. It was a concept album (well, at least Side Two is), centered on a sort of fairy tale. The narrative, like many from the era, is confusing. But the music – big, brash and way more complex than anything attempted by the group’s spin-off band, Faces – is tops all the way.

Lazy Sunday” reached number two on the UK Singles Chart in 1968. It was written by the Small Faces songwriting duo Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane, and appeared on the band’s 1968 concept album Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake and preceded the album as a successful single, despite being released against the band’s wishes.

The low-budget promotional video for “Lazy Sunday” was filmed at drummer  Kenney Jones‘ parents’ home on Havering Street in Stepney, East London and features his next door neighbour pretending to strangle Marriott.

“Lazy Sunday” has a traditional cockney East End of London music-hall sound. The song was inspired by Steve Marriott’s feuds with his neighbours  and is also noticeable for its distinct vocal changes. Marriott sings large parts of the song in a greatly exaggerated cockney accent; he did this partly due to an argument he had with the Hollies, who said that Marriott had never sung in his own accent.  In the final bridge and the last two choruses, he reverts to his usual transatlantic (singing) accent.

The backing melody quotes “Colonel Bogey March” by F. J. Ricketts and “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” by the Rolling Stones played on kazoo. At the end of the song the tune dissolves into birdsong.

‘Here Come The Nice’ is the ultimate, indispensible tribute to Swinging London’s finest and best-loved pop heroes! The Small Faces the set includes.
4 CDs | 75 songs remastered from the original tapes | 72-page hardback book, lavishly illustrated | Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia | Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews | 3 rare singles in red, white & blue vinyl | Olympic Studios 7-inch replica acetate | 64-page softcover illustrated lyric book | Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set | 5 postcards with rare photos & artwork | Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake facsimile press kit | 2 large-size reproduction posters | 2 exclusive Gered Mankowitz fine art prints
Written contributions from Robert PlantPaul WellerDavid BowieNick MasonPeter FramptonChris RobinsonGlen MatlockChad SmithPaul Stanley & many more.

“In forensic detail and with a sleevenote by Pete Townshend, this 4-CD box rights the wrongs wreaked on Marriot & Lane, McLagan and Jones’s peak years.”
MOJO

“The Mod scamps’ best work, finally given due respect.”
UNCUT

“It’s the package of the year, beautifully crafted for the Small Faces fanatic in all of us.”
GOLDMINE (USA)

“An impeccable monument to the greatest pop group this country ever produced.”
SHINDIG!

“Now at last, this massive box set finally set’s to rights not only the band’s legacy but also the actual sounds created. Beautifully presented, meticulously researched and annotated this is the only Small Faces recording you will ever need…” 
TOTAL MUSIC MAGAZINE

“Lavish, four-CD retrospective includes unreleased material, out-takes, and alternate versions. Sheds new light on an extraordinary pop experiment.” 
8/10 – 2-page review by Paul Moody
CLASSIC ROCK – April 2014

In celebration of the Small Faces’ induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, Charly Records are proud to present ‘Here Come The Nice’, a deluxe heavyweight 4 CD box set chronicling the group’s career on Andrew Loog Oldham’s pioneering Immediate Records label, curated by surviving band members Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan.

A whopping 75 songs includes every hit single, A & B side released worldwide on Immediate Records plus a generous bounty of unreleased material, outtakes, early and alternate versions, live tracks and previously unheard recording sessions from Olympic, Trident and IBC Studios, all sourced and remastered from recently discovered original master and multitrack tapes.

The lavish 72-page hardback book, with a heartfelt foreword by Pete Townshend and introduction by Kenney and Mac, is full of previously unseen photos and rare memorabilia, a career overview by esteemed Mojo magazine scribe Mark Paytress, The box is crammed full with exclusive extras, such as replicas of three of the rarest Small Faces EPs in colored vinyl, an impossibly rare Olympic Studios acetate, large-size repro posters, fine art prints, 64-page fully illustrated lyric booklet, collectors postcards and more, all paying testament to the enduring musical genius of the Small Faces. www.thesmallfaces.com

What’s In The Box?

Lavishly illustrated 72 page hardbound coffee table book: 
Introduction by Kenney & Mac plus a foreword by Pete Townshend.
Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia.
Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews.
Exclusive Gered Mankowitz interview on photographing ‘Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake’.

Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set.

Lyric Booklet: 
64-page fully illustrated song booklet with rare photos & memorabilia.
Complete lyrics transcribed & endorsed by band members for the first time ever.

Red, white and blue coloured vinyl: 
Three replica 7-inch EPs of the rarest Small Faces vinyl originally released in 1967:
Small Faces album sampler – Excerpts from the Small Faces LP.
Here Come The Nice 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.
Itchycoo Park 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.

Replica Studio Acetate:
Olympic Sound Studios one-off acetate pressing for Andrew Loog-Oldham for the song Mystery.

Two large reproduction posters: 
Reproductions of original posters for the Tin Soldier single featuring photography by Gered Mankowitz 
Newcastle City Hall live concert from 1968.

Press kit for Ogden’s Gone Nut Flake: 
Rare 6-panel Immediate Records Press Kit from 1968.

Double sided postcards: 
Five collector’s edition postcards with rare photos of each Small Faces band member backed with memorabilia from the Immediate Records Archive.

Fine art prints: 
Two beautiful prints provided by Gered Mankowitz from his 1967 Itchycoo Park photo sessions.

CD1 – Small Faces Singles Worldwide As Bs & Eps:

1. Here Come The Nice (mono) 2:55
2. Talk To You (mono) 2:05
3. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (mono) 2:15
4. Something I Want To Tell You (mono) 2:07
5. Get Yourself Together (mono) 2:16
6. Become Like You (mono) 1:56
7. Green Circles (mono) 2:32
8. Eddie’s Dreaming (b-side edit) (mono) 2:41
9. Itchycoo Park (mono) 2:44
10. I’m Only Dreaming (mono) 2:22
11. Tin Soldier (mono) 3:19
12. I Feel Much Better (mono) 3:55
13. Lazy Sunday (mono) 3:02
14. Rollin’ Over (Part II of Happiness Stan) (mono) 2:12
15. Mad John (single version) (mono) 2:07
16. The Journey (single version) (mono) 2:51
17. The Universal (mono) 2:42
18. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (mono) 2:47
19. Afterglow Of Your Love (single version) (mono) 3:22
20. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (mono) 3:18

Original Immediate single versions. Taken from original mono master tapes.

CD2 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 1:

1. Shades Of Green (mono) 0:38
2. Green Circles (take 1) (mono) 1:04
3. Green Circles (take 1 alt mix 1) (mono) 2:45
4. Anything (tracking session) (stereo) 3:46
5. Anything (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
6. Show Me The Way (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:09
7. Wit Art Yer (tracking session) (mono) 2:50
8. Wit Art Yer (backing track) (stereo) 2:27
9. I Can’t Make It (alt mix) (stereo) 2:26
10. Doolally (tracking session) (mono) 4:06
11. What’s It Called? (overdub session) (mono) 0:36
12. Call It Something Nice (take 9) (stereo) 2:04
13. Wide Eyed Girl (take 2) (stereo) 1:43
14. Wide Eyed Girl On The Wall (alt mix) (stereo) 3:28
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (stripped down mix) (stereo) 3:21
16. Red Balloon With A Blue Surprise (take 5) (stereo) 0:46
17. Red Balloon (alt mix) (stereo) 4:29
18. Saieide Mamoon (tracking session) (stereo) 9:36

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD3 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 2:

1. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (alt mix) (stereo) 3:22
2. I Can’t Make It (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:33
3. This Feeling Of Spring (take 1) (stereo) 1:43
4. All Our Yesterdays (backing track) (mono) 2:09
5. Talk To You (alt mix) (stereo) 2:22
6. Mind The Doors Please (mono) 5:01
7. Things Are Going To Get Better (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:43
8. Mad John (tracking session) (stereo) 3:58
9. A Collibosher (take 4) (stereo) 3:31
10. Lazy Sunday Afternoon (early mix) (mono) 3:00
11. Jack (backing track) (stereo) 3:35
12. Fred (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
13. Red Balloon (stripped down mix) (stereo) 1:33
14. Kolomodelomo (take 1) (stereo) 2:45
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (alt mix) (stereo) 3:34
16. Jenny’s Song (take 2) (stereo) 4:04

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD4 – Alternate Small Faces Outtakes & In Concert:

1. Itchycoo Park (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:50
2. Here Come The Nice (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 3:01
3. I’m Only Dreaming (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:23
4. Don’t Burst My Bubble (mono) 2:24
5. I Feel Much Better (stereo) 3:56
6. Green Circles (take 1 Italian version) (mono) 2:44*
7. Yesterday, Today And Tomorrow (alt mix) (stereo) 1:50*
8. Piccanniny (alt mix) (stereo) 3:02
9. Get Yourself Together (alt mix) (stereo) 2:18*
10. Eddie’s Dreaming (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:44*
11. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:08*
12. Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire (US alt mix) (mono) 2:00*
13. Afterglow Of Your Love (alt single version) (mono) 3:36*
14. (If You Think You’re) Groovy (mono) (The Lot Version)- P.P. Arnold & Small Faces 2:55
15. Me You And Us Too (mono) 3:32
16. The Universal (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:39
17. Rollin’ Over (live) (stereo) 2:29
18. If I Were A Carpenter (live) (stereo) 2:29
19. Every Little Bit Hurts (live) (stereo) 6:12
20. All Or Nothing (live) (stereo) 4:05
21. Tin Soldier (live) (stereo) 3:19

All tracks rare or * previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio and session master tapes.

Live tracks recorded at Newcastle City Hall 18th November 1968. Taken from Pye Studios master tape, pitch and speed corrected.

Small Faces Box set vinyl:

Small Faces Album Sampler – One-sided promo single – Excerpts From The Small Faces L.P. (mono)
The original 7″ vinyl was issued as a promotional single for the debut Immediate album. Featuring excepts from Get Yourself Together, Green Circles, Talk To You, All Our Yesterdays, Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire with DJ Tommy Vance announcements, the original vinyl has gone on to become the rarest Small Faces single amongst collectors.

Here Come The Nice – French E.P.
Here Come The Nice (mono) – This is the same performance as the regular ‘Here Come The Nice’ mixed to mono but similar to other releases at the time, was subjected to varispeed so plays slightly faster.

Talk To You (mono)
Become Like You (mono)
Get Yourself Together (mono)

Itchycoo Park – French E.P.
Itchycoo Park (mono)
I’m Onky Dreaming (mono)
Green Circles (mono)
Eddie’s Dreaming (mono)

Mystery – Replica acetate
Intended to be a single, a handful of acetates of Mystery were produced for the band and Andrew Loog Oldham to check the mix. For unknown reasons, the single wasn’t released, and Ronnie went back into Olympic to record a new vocal during April 1967 for the newly entitled Something I Want To Tell You. This is a replica of the acetate delivered to Andrew Loog Oldham back in 1967.

 

Box set

First Step

When vocalist Steve Marriott left to form Humble Pie, his three Small Faces bandmates regrouped with Jeff Beck Group axeman Ron Wood and singer Rod Stewart. With the name shortened to Faces, the U.K. quintet made an auspicious debut in 1970 with the album release “FIRST STEP”, a title that made sly reference to the beginner’s guide to guitar that Wood holds in the cover photo.

First Step was the first album by the then British group re named Faces, released in early 1970. The album was released only a few months after the Faces had formed from the ashes of the Small Faces (from which Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan hailed) and The Jeff Beck Group (from which Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood hailed.) The album is credited to the Small Faces on the cover , The album cover shows Ronnie Wood holding a copy of Geoffrey Sisley’s seminal guitar tutorial First Step: How to Play the Guitar Plectrum Style.

But there was nothing inexperienced about any of these musicians, and their chemistry and superb performances are evident on each of the 10 tracks. After an ace cover of Dylan’s “Wicked Messenger” the material is all original, with songwriting duties spread fairly evenly among the members; with a pair of instrumentals and such fine tracks as “Around the Plynth” Other highlights include Ronnie Lane’s folksy “Stone”, the hard-rocking “Shake, Shudder, Shiver”, “Three Button Hand Me Down” (on which both Lane and Wood play the bassline, affording the track a unique sonic quality in the Faces catalogue), and the soulful “Flying”.

it’s a consistently enjoyable collection. Faces were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012, and the journey that brought them there begins with FIRST STEP.

In August 2015, the album was reissued in a remastered and expanded form, including two previously-unreleased bonus tracks recorded shortly after the album’s release, “Behind the Sun” and “Mona the Blues” (although the latter was remade by Lane and Wood in 1972 for their Mahoney’s Last Stand film soundtrack).

“The ballsiest-sounding piece of full-length psychedelia to come out of England in 1968” Released: 24 May 1968

Marking a definitive break from Small Faces’ early mod and R&B underpinnings, the two-act Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake was a bold move into the realms of stylish psychedelia and the eccentric affectation of late ‘60s English invention. Although more than a hint of Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane’s Cockney humor was inescapable—the whimsical “Rene” and “Lazy Sunday” being obvious examples—two bold anthems, “Song of a Baker” and “Long Agos and Worlds Away,” predated Led Zeppelin’s arch bombast by several months. At the time, the round album cover, made to resemble a tobacco tin, and the sidelong gibberish of “Happiness Stan,” a pseudo fairytale narrated by English actor Stanley Unwin, also garnered plenty of attention. One of the first concept albums ever envisioned (and basically unplayable live), Ogden’s remains a little appreciated musical masterpiece. Small Faces would disband the following year.

The Small Faces were such an influential band during the time when when there were great changes going on in music, especially in the UK. Listen to Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake which was the culmination of that change from a completely record company controlled ‘group’ to a band who were experimenting with the technology available and under the influence of psychedelia. Side 2 of this album featured a cockney themed story through narrative by Professor Stanley Unwin and songs which may not be to everyone’s taste. Song Of A Baker is a real highlight. The fairy tale follows Stan in his quest to find the missing half of the moon, after seeing a half-moon in the sky one night. Along the way, he saves a fly from starvation, and in gratitude the insect tells him of someone who can answer his question and also tell him the philosophy of life itself. With magic power,Stan intones, “If all the flies were one fly, what a great enormous fly-follolloper that would bold,” and the fly grows to gigantic proportions. Seated on the giant fly’s back, Stan takes a psychedelic journey to the cave of Mad John the Hermit, who explains that the moon’s disappearance is only temporary, and demonstrates by pointing out that Stan has spent so long on his quest that the moon is now full again. He then sings Stan a cheerful song about the meaning of life.

The album was originally released on vinyl in a circular novelty package of a metal replica of a giant tobacco tin, inside which was a poster created with five connected paper circles with pictures of the band members. This proved too expensive and not successful as the tins tended to roll off of shelves and it was quickly followed by a paper/card replica with a gatefold cover. There have been Two limited-edition CD releases (including a three-disc deluxe edition in 2006 that included the original mono mix of the album on CD for the first time) went even further by packaging the disc(s) in a circular tin (as the original vinyl release had). 

Small Faces
  • Steve Marriott − lead, harmony, and backing vocals, guitars, harmonica, piano on “Happiness Stan” and “Every Little Bit Hurts”, Hammond organ on “Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake”, bass guitar on “The Journey”, shared lead vocals on “The Hungry Intruder” and “HappyDaysToyTown”
  • Ronnie Lane − harmony and backing vocals, bass guitar, electric guitar on “The Journey”, upright bass on “Mad John”, lead vocals on “Song of a Baker” and “The Journey”, shared lead vocals on “The Hungry Intruder” and “HappyDaysToyTown”
  • Kenney Jones − backing vocals, drums, percussion
  • Ian McLagan − harmony and backing vocals, keyboards, electric guitar and bass guitar on “Long Agos and Worlds Apart”, lead vocals on “Long Agos and Worlds Apart”

With:

  • Stanley Unwin – “looney links”
  • Glyn Johns – recording engineer

The award-winning artwork for the album cover was done by Nick Tweddell and Pete Brown, who were art school friends of Ian Mclagan

Released: May 24th

What a great track Ooh La La is a song from The Faces. The song was written by Ronnie Lane and Ronnie Wood and sung by Wood. That is strange because The Faces had one of the best lead singers around at the time…Rod Stewart. Stewart by this time was soaring as a solo artist and his interest in the Faces was waning. He claimed the song was not in his key to sing. He did do vocals for it then and Lane but Wood ended up singing the released version.

The Faces had one big hit…Stay With Me but this song is their greatest song to me. Rod Stewart finally covered the song in 1998 for a tribute to Ronnie Lane. Ronnie Lane did his own version with his band Slim Chance. Ronnie Wood also does it live in solo shows. A song between Granddad and Son about the ways of love. The song never ages because the subject matter never changes and it is continually passed along. The song creates an atmosphere and Wood not known for his singing ability did a great job on this one.

This week in 1973: The Faces scored their first UK #1 album with their final studio release, ‘Ooh La La’, on Warner Bros. Records; with his career in the stratosphere due to the success of his solo albums, Rod Stewart had became increasingly distanced from his bandmates by the time of this recording; produced by Glyn Johns, highlights included “Silicone Grown”, “Cindy Incidentally” & the raucous yet bittersweet album closer “Ooh La La”, featuring the only-ever Faces lead vocal from guitarist Ronnie Wood; the album cover is a photo of Gastone’, a stage character of 1920s Italian comedian Ettore Petrolini, originally designed in such a way that when the top edge was pressed down Gastone’s eyes would discolour & move to the side, while his jaw dropped into a leering smile…

1. Silicone Grown 0:00
2. Cindy Incidentally 3:06
3. Flags And Banners 5:43
4. My Fault 7:45
5. Borstal Boys 10:54
6. Fly In The Onitment 13:48
7. If I’m On The Late Side 17:39
8. Glad And Sorry 20:19
9. Just Another Honky 23:23
10. Ooh La La 27:00

The complete Faces album released in 1973 including many of their best songs. I would say it’s their best studio album.