Posts Tagged ‘Ronnie Lane’

Record Player, Disc, Multimedia, Music

The National return with I Am Easy To Find, there’s black vinyl, indies only clear vinyl 2xLP and deluxe 3xLP pressed on 3 different colours.
New black midi 12″ arrives on Rough Trade.
Brand new 12″ from Interpol.  Limited Dinked Edition of the new album from Black Peaches (featuring Rob Smoughton of Hot Chip). This version is pressed on teal vinyl with an exclusive 7″ and a signed print.
Third Man reissue the long out of print second album by The Raconteurs.
Institute return with Readjusting The Locks on bourbon coloured vinyl, via Sacred Bones.
slowthai unleashes his debut album, limited white vinyl pressing.
Two new David Bowie releases, Boys Keep Swinging 7″ picture disc and the nice Clareville Demos 7″ box set.
Excellent new compilation on Anthology, Sad About The Times, full of 70s psych jammers.

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The National –  I Am Easy to Find

I Am Easy To Find is the band’s eighth studio album and the follow-up to 2017’s Grammy®-award winning release Sleep Well Beast. A companion short film with the same name will also be released with music by The National and inspired by the album. The film was directed by Academy Award-nominated director Mike Mills (20th Century Women, Beginners), and starring Academy Award Winner Alicia Vikander. Mills, along with the band, is credited as co-producer of the album, which was mostly recorded at Long Pond, Hudson Valley, NY with additional sessions in Paris, Berlin, Cincinnati, Austin, Dublin, Brooklyn and more far flung locations. The album features vocal contributions from Sharon Van Etten, Brooklyn Youth Chorus, Lisa Hannigan, Mina Tindle and more.

As the album’s opening track, You Had Your Soul With You, unfurls, it’s so far, so National: a digitally manipulated guitar line, skittering drums, Matt Berninger’s familiar baritone, mounting tension. Then around the 2:15 mark, the true nature of I Am Easy To Find announces itself: The racket subsides, strings swell, and the voice of long-time David Bowie bandmate Gail Ann Dorsey booms out—not as background vocals, not as a hook, but to take over the song. Elsewhere it’s Irish singer-songwriter Lisa Hannigan, or Sharon Van Etten, or Mina Tindle or Kate Stables of This Is the Kit, or varying combinations of them. The Brooklyn Youth Choir, whom Bryce Dessner had worked with before. There are choral arrangements and strings on nearly every track, largely put together by Bryce in Paris—not a negation of the band’s dramatic tendencies, but a redistribution of them.

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Interpol – A Fine Mess

 

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Olden Yolk – Living Theatre

The musical duo of Shane Butler and Caity Shaffer released their debut album as Olden Yolk last year, an alluring concoction of hypnagogic folk and kosmiche rhythms, expanding and refining Butler’s work in his former band Quilt toward a more focused direction. Living Theatre is the follow up to that eponymous debut and more than lives up to its promise.

The songs on Living Theatre were written and recorded during a heavy time of transition and upheaval for the duo, with personal tragedies and a big move from their NYC home to a warmer climate in Los Angeles coloring the album’s inception. Thematically Living Theatre tunes seem to be about how humans react to the ways life is colored by both fate and the consequences of the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. Musically, the duo’s songwriting has gelled into a unified front, relying more on the subtle shifts of melody and rhythm than a barrage of chord changes; Living Theatre’s hooks lap at your feet like a babbling brook, rather than bowl you over like violent waves. The refinement in tunes like Castor and Pollux, Grand Palais and first single Cotton and Cane points to a new frontier for the group; soaring skyward toward the emotionally textural plateaus of trailblazers like The Go-Betweens or Yo La Tengo. There’s a discernible romantic feel to tunes like Violent Days or Distant Episode’s lush arrangements with Shaffer in particular finding her own voice here; poetic, abstract and expressive. Living Theatre showcases a band breaking free from it’s chrysalis, and embracing its next phase of evolution.

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Alex Lahey – The Best Of Club

On her sophomore LP, The Best of Luck Club, 26-year-old Melbourne, Australia native Alex Lahey navigates the pangs of generational ennui with the pint half-full and a spot cleared on the bar stool next to her. Self-doubt, burn out, break-ups, mental health, moving in with her girlfriend, vibrators: The Best of Luck Club showcases the universal language of Lahey’s sharp songwriting, her propensity for taking the minute details of the personal and flipping it public through anthemic pop-punk. Lahey’s 2017 debut I Love You Like a Brother encases Lahey’s knack for writing a killer hook and her acute sense of humor delivered via a slacker-rock package and, in a way, The Best of Luck Club picks up where that record left off. Lahey co-produced the album alongside acclaimed engineer and producer Catherine Marks (Local Natives, Wolf Alice, Manchester Orchestra), and dives headfirst into a broader spectrum of both emotion and sound through polished, arena pop-punk in the vein of Paramore with the introspective sheen of Alvvays or Tegan and Sara. Here, Lahey documents the highest highs and the lowest lows of her life to date. After a whirlwind of global touring in support of breakout debut I Love You Like a Brother, Lahey wrote the bulk of her follow-up in Nashville during 12-hour days of songwriting. There, she found the inspiration for The Best of Luck Club ís concept: the dive bar scene and its genuine energy.”Whether you’ve had the best day of your life or the worst day of your life, you can just sit up at the bar and turn to the person next to you – who has no idea who you are – and have a chat. And the response that you generally get at the end of the conversation is, ‘Best of luck, so The Best of Luck Club is that place.

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Lone Justice – Live At The Palomino 1983

Previously unissued live performance from October 22nd, 1983. Recorded at Los Angeles’ iconic Palomino club. New liners from the band’s Marvin Etzioni and Ryan Hedgecock. Located in North Hollywood, The Palomino hosted Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, Buck Owens, and many more classic country acts. Later, George Harrison, Elvis Costello, and Green Day played there. It was even featured in Every Which Way But Loose, Hooper, and even CHiPs. But, in the early ’80s, it was a haven for “cow-punk” acts like Lone Justice. Live At the Palomino, 1983 features 12 tracks from the early Lone Justice line-up consisting of Maria McKee, Ryan Hedgecock, Marvin Etzioni, and Don Willens. Songs from their yet to be issued debut are coupled with classic country covers, and songs which have appeared on various collections throughout the years – but never with this live power from this L.A. landmark. Packaging features photos and new notes from Etzioni and Hedgecock, and is issued with full cooperation from the band. Step back into the time when Lone Justice was the band to see, way out in the dusty valley. A timeless performance from a band that helped define a genre: Lone Justice – Live At The Palomino, 1983. They still are the light.

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The Doors – Stockholm ‘68

The Doors, live at Konserthuset, Stockholm on 20th September 1968 The Doors finally visited Europe in September 1968, playing to rapturous audiences in the UK, Germany, Holland, Denmark and Sweden. Many fans agree that they were at their peak on this tour, despite Jim Morrison’s condition being unpredictable from gig to gig. This release contains the final date of the tour, originally broadcast by Sveriges Radio. It includes rare performances of Mack The Knife, Love Street and You’re Lost Little Girl as well as familiar staples of their set, and is presented here together with background notes and images.

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Ronnie Lane – Just For A Moment: Music 1973-1997

This box includes Ronnie Lane’s 4 solo albums – Anymore For Anymore (and singles), Ronnie Lane’s Slim Chance, One For the Road and the cruelly underrated See Me. In addition it features tracks from Ronnie’s Mahoney’s Last Standalbum with Ron Wood and Rough Mix with Pete Townshend. The final disc of the set focuses on Ronnie’s time in the US with live highlights and studio tracks never previously released. The set also featured lots of rare and unreleased material – be prepared to here fantastic cover versions of The Wanderer, Rocket’ 69and The Joint Is Jumpin’as well as unheard Ronnie compositions plus live recordings, tracks for the BBC and highlights from a legendary Rockpalast concert. The set is curated by long time musical associate of Ronnie’s, Slim Chancer musician Charlie Hart. Comprehensive sleevenotes focus on Ronnie the musician, the songwriter, the collaborator and split the post ’73 period into three distinct parts. Writers are Paolo Hewitt, Kris Needs and Kent Benjamin covering Ronnie’s Austin years.

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Traffic – The Studio Albums 1967-74

50 years after Steve Winwood jumped ship from chart toppers The Spencer Davis Group and quit the bright lights in favour of the countryside and jam sessions with Jim Capaldi, Dave Mason and Chris Wood we celebrate Traffic’s influential legacy with this stunning limited edition Island records studio collection. Boasting all 6 studio albums recorded for the label remastered from the original tapes and presented in their original and highly collectible ‘first’ Island pressing form (gatefold sleeves, pink eye labels etc), the set also includes a related and super rare facsimile promo poster for each album.

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David Bowie – Clareville Grove Demos

Following on from Spying Through A Keyhole, in early 1969 at his flat in Clareville Grove, London, David Bowie with John ‘Hutch’ Hutchinson continued to demo Space Oddity and other tracks. This live demo tape session is released as a 7″ vinyl singles box set of six home demos, four of which are previously unreleased recordings. As with the Spying Through A Keyhole vinyl singles box set, the design of each single label is presented to reflect the way David sent many of his demos to publishers and record companies, featuring his own handwritten song titles on EMIDISC acetate labels with cover and print photos by David’s then manager Ken Pitt taken in the Clareville Grove flat. The singles themselves are all mono and play at 45 r.p.m. Due to the nature of some of the solo home demos where Bowie accompanied himself on acoustic guitar, the recording quality isn’t always of a usual studio fidelity. This is partly due to David’s enthusiastic strumming hitting the red on a couple of the tracks, along with the limitations of the original recording equipment and tape degradation. However, the historical importance of these songs and the fact that the selections are from an archive of tracks cleared for release by Bowie, overrides this shortcoming.

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David Bowie – Boys Keep Swinging

2019 is the 40th anniversary of Lodger and first comes the latest limited 7″ picture disc from Parlophone, Boys Keep Swinging.

While originally recording the song, Bowie had hoped to capture a garage band feel with the musicians swapping instruments after a deck of Brian Eno’s Oblique Strategies cards had suggested ‘reverse roles’. So guitarist Carlos Alomar played drums and drummer Dennis Davis played bass.

The version featured on the A side is the 2017 mix by Tony Visconti from Lodger, undertaken for the A New Career In A New Townbox set, as both Tony and Bowie felt they never had the opportunity to give Lodger the mix it deserved in 1979, due to time and studio constraints.

The AA side features I Pray, Ole which was apparently recorded during the Lodger sessions, but remained unreleased until mixed by David and David Richards for inclusion as an extra track on the 1991 reissue of theLodger album. The track has been commercially unavailable since then.

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Working Mens Club – Bad Blood / Suburban Heights

Like a homage to smoke-filled vaults, aging billiard rooms and crumby packets of pork scratchings in the Working Men’s Clubs of days gone by, Todmorden-by-way of-Europe trio Syd, Jake and Giulia are about to fling open the doors of their own millennial social hub with the fresh post-punk of infectious debut single, Bad Blood / Suburban Heights. With the start-stop sound of Talking Heads, Gang of Four and Television,Bad Blood, fuses 70s post- punk with the stomp of Parquet Courts’ positivity and resonates with the start of the weekend...Syd’s half-spoken words jab through Strokes guitar lines with Mark E Smith drawl…it’s the feeling of a Saturday spent scuffing about in thrift stores and hanging out with friends.

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L’Epee – Dreams

This is the debut single release from L’Epee, the band are Emmaunelle Seigner (Ultra Orange and Emmanuelle), Anton Newcombe (The Brian Jonestown Massacre) and Lionel and Marie Liminana (The Liminanas). Recorded in Cabestany (France) and Berlin at Anton’s Cobra Studio, this three track 12” single comes in deluxe packaging and precedes the full length album released in June this year.

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Ronnie Lane was a Britsh songwriter and bass player. He started with the Small Faces as the bass player and he and Steve Marriott wrote most of bands songs. The Small Faces never toured America so they never really broke out big. They did have 11 top twenty hits in the UK but only one in America with Itchycoo Park charting at #16.

Steve Mariott left the Small Faces in 1968 and Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood joined Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones, and Ian McLagan to start The Faces. The Faces released four albums between 1970-1973… First Step, Long Player, A Nod is as Good as a Wink…to a Blind Horse and Ooh La La. They were one of the top grossing touring bands.

After Rod Stewart’s solo career took off his interest in the band began to wane and in 1973 Ronnie Lane quit. After Ronnie left the Faces, they made no more studio albums.

Ronnie started his own folk-country band named “Slim Chance” and released a surprise hit single “Come On” in 1973 and it went to #11 in the UK. Ronnie had a unique idea of touring. His tour was called “The Passing Show” which toured the countryside with a circus tent and included a ringmaster and clowns.

In 1976 he owed a record company an album and he was in financial trouble. He asked Pete Townshend to help him record an album. The album was called “Rough Mix” and it was a very strong album with great reviews but the record company didn’t promote it and the sales were not great.

During the recording of “Rough Mix” Lane diagnosed with was Multiple Sclerosis. He still toured with Eric Clapton and others afterward and released an album in 1979 called “See Me.”

In 1983 Ronnie called some of his musician friends to do some charity concerts for the Research for Multiple Sclerosis. They were known as the ARMS (Action into Research for Multiple Sclerosis) Charity Concerts. Musicians such as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Steve Winwood, Bill Wyman, Charlie Watts, and more came out to support Ronnie.

Ronnie Lane died of Pneumonia while in the final stages of Multiple Sclerosis in 1997

 

Released in June 1967 the same month as the Beatles’ ‘Sgt Pepper’, ‘Small Faces’ is the band’s first album for Immediate Records, recorded at IBC and Olympic Studios. With lead vocals shared between three band members it has been described as their first “grown-up” record and a “neglected gem” which saw them develop a more fully-formed sound.

The Small Faces were Mod to the core, but could also play instruments. The band members were lead singer/guitarist Steve Marriott, bassist Ronnie (“Plonk”) Lane, drummer Kenney Jones, and organist Ian McLagan (who replaced Jimmy Winston early on). All four stood under 5 feet 5 inches tall (Eric Clapton, upon meeting them for the first time, said they all looked like little “haw-bits”). Their short stature, mischievousness, and stylish Carnaby Street threads made them the most eye-catching band in England for a time,

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Two extraordinary Small Faces release from Immediate Records albums were requested by Sainsburys as exclusive coloured vinyl editions. Released 1st June and limited to 2,500 and in every UK Sainsbury’s that stocks vinyl. Ogdens‘ is stereo, Small Faces mono. The last five years have seen a massive programme of tape recovery and upgrading with the full co-operation and endorsement of both surviving band members. Kenney Jones has given access to his personal tape archive and many of the band’s original master tapes and session multi-tracks, previously lost for over forty years, have been discovered and re-mastered. It is thus now possible to present the Small Faces’ recordings sounding better than at any time since the 1960s. The Re-Masters series also presents a host of newly discovered tracks and alternative versions, alongside original artwork, photos, rare publicity material and memorabilia with comprehensive new sleeve-notes based around band interviews.

One of Britain’s most influential bands of the Sixties and a major influence on the new wave of Britpop bands, the Small Faces hit their creative and commercial highpoint with their psychedelic concept album Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake. Released in May ‘68. Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flakeis considered a classic by “those in the know,” but often overlooked when classic rock albums are bandied.

Ogdens’ was the first record released in a round sleeve, designed to resemble an old tobacco tin, and the name parodies an 1899 brand of tobacco. The sleeve unfolds to four circles with moody black-and-white pics of the band members by famous photographer Gered Mankowitz . Musically, Ogdens is equally mind-blasting. After the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper, Ogdens’ was the first “concept album,” preceding both S.F. Sorrow by the Pretty Things and The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society by several months. The second side is a Ronnie Lane-inspired musical fairy tale about “Happiness Stan,” who goes on a quest, assisted by a friendly fly, to find the other half of the “dangly” moon. Linking various musical snips is daft narration by English comic Stanley Unwin, who combined the Small’s cockney slang with his own nonsensical “Unwinese” speak

A bona fide classic of the late Sixties, Ogdens’ was released on the famous Immediate label in the summer of 1968 and went straight to the number one spot in the UK album chart, remaining there for six weeks. A heady blend of cockney music-hall humour, tough rock numbers, blues and psychedelia, it spawned two of the group’s biggest hit singles in Afterglow (Of Your Love) and Lazy Sunday.

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The six tracks which made up side two of the original LP are introduced by Stanley Unwin, one of Britain’s most popular comedians of the day, renowned for his inventive use of English.

The fourteen bonus tracks are highlights from the group’s time with Immediate Records from 1967 to 1969.

As well as hit singles such as Itchycoo Park, Here Come The Nice and The Universal, these include live recordings of Tin Soldier and their 1966 Decca number one single All Or Nothing, plus their memorable duet with label mate P.P. Arnold.

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The Small Faces : Steve Marriott on Vocals and Guitar, Ronnie Lane on Bass, Kenney Jones on Drums and Ian McLagan on Wurlitzer Piano and Hammond Organ were rogues and rounders,

‘Here Come The Nice’ is the ultimate, indispensible tribute to Swinging London’s finest and best-loved pop heroes! The Small Faces the set includes.
4 CDs | 75 songs remastered from the original tapes | 72-page hardback book, lavishly illustrated | Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia | Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews | 3 rare singles in red, white & blue vinyl | Olympic Studios 7-inch replica acetate | 64-page softcover illustrated lyric book | Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set | 5 postcards with rare photos & artwork | Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake facsimile press kit | 2 large-size reproduction posters | 2 exclusive Gered Mankowitz fine art prints
Written contributions from Robert PlantPaul WellerDavid BowieNick MasonPeter FramptonChris RobinsonGlen MatlockChad SmithPaul Stanley & many more.

“In forensic detail and with a sleevenote by Pete Townshend, this 4-CD box rights the wrongs wreaked on Marriot & Lane, McLagan and Jones’s peak years.”
MOJO

“The Mod scamps’ best work, finally given due respect.”
UNCUT

“It’s the package of the year, beautifully crafted for the Small Faces fanatic in all of us.”
GOLDMINE (USA)

“An impeccable monument to the greatest pop group this country ever produced.”
SHINDIG!

“Now at last, this massive box set finally set’s to rights not only the band’s legacy but also the actual sounds created. Beautifully presented, meticulously researched and annotated this is the only Small Faces recording you will ever need…” 
TOTAL MUSIC MAGAZINE

“Lavish, four-CD retrospective includes unreleased material, out-takes, and alternate versions. Sheds new light on an extraordinary pop experiment.” 
8/10 – 2-page review by Paul Moody
CLASSIC ROCK – April 2014

In celebration of the Small Faces’ induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, Charly Records are proud to present ‘Here Come The Nice’, a deluxe heavyweight 4 CD box set chronicling the group’s career on Andrew Loog Oldham’s pioneering Immediate Records label, curated by surviving band members Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan.

A whopping 75 songs includes every hit single, A & B side released worldwide on Immediate Records plus a generous bounty of unreleased material, outtakes, early and alternate versions, live tracks and previously unheard recording sessions from Olympic, Trident and IBC Studios, all sourced and remastered from recently discovered original master and multitrack tapes.

The lavish 72-page hardback book, with a heartfelt foreword by Pete Townshend and introduction by Kenney and Mac, is full of previously unseen photos and rare memorabilia, a career overview by esteemed Mojo magazine scribe Mark Paytress, The box is crammed full with exclusive extras, such as replicas of three of the rarest Small Faces EPs in colored vinyl, an impossibly rare Olympic Studios acetate, large-size repro posters, fine art prints, 64-page fully illustrated lyric booklet, collectors postcards and more, all paying testament to the enduring musical genius of the Small Faces. www.thesmallfaces.com

What’s In The Box?

Lavishly illustrated 72 page hardbound coffee table book: 
Introduction by Kenney & Mac plus a foreword by Pete Townshend.
Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia.
Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews.
Exclusive Gered Mankowitz interview on photographing ‘Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake’.

Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set.

Lyric Booklet: 
64-page fully illustrated song booklet with rare photos & memorabilia.
Complete lyrics transcribed & endorsed by band members for the first time ever.

Red, white and blue coloured vinyl: 
Three replica 7-inch EPs of the rarest Small Faces vinyl originally released in 1967:
Small Faces album sampler – Excerpts from the Small Faces LP.
Here Come The Nice 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.
Itchycoo Park 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.

Replica Studio Acetate:
Olympic Sound Studios one-off acetate pressing for Andrew Loog-Oldham for the song Mystery.

Two large reproduction posters: 
Reproductions of original posters for the Tin Soldier single featuring photography by Gered Mankowitz 
Newcastle City Hall live concert from 1968.

Press kit for Ogden’s Gone Nut Flake: 
Rare 6-panel Immediate Records Press Kit from 1968.

Double sided postcards: 
Five collector’s edition postcards with rare photos of each Small Faces band member backed with memorabilia from the Immediate Records Archive.

Fine art prints: 
Two beautiful prints provided by Gered Mankowitz from his 1967 Itchycoo Park photo sessions.

CD1 – Small Faces Singles Worldwide As Bs & Eps:

1. Here Come The Nice (mono) 2:55
2. Talk To You (mono) 2:05
3. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (mono) 2:15
4. Something I Want To Tell You (mono) 2:07
5. Get Yourself Together (mono) 2:16
6. Become Like You (mono) 1:56
7. Green Circles (mono) 2:32
8. Eddie’s Dreaming (b-side edit) (mono) 2:41
9. Itchycoo Park (mono) 2:44
10. I’m Only Dreaming (mono) 2:22
11. Tin Soldier (mono) 3:19
12. I Feel Much Better (mono) 3:55
13. Lazy Sunday (mono) 3:02
14. Rollin’ Over (Part II of Happiness Stan) (mono) 2:12
15. Mad John (single version) (mono) 2:07
16. The Journey (single version) (mono) 2:51
17. The Universal (mono) 2:42
18. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (mono) 2:47
19. Afterglow Of Your Love (single version) (mono) 3:22
20. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (mono) 3:18

Original Immediate single versions. Taken from original mono master tapes.

CD2 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 1:

1. Shades Of Green (mono) 0:38
2. Green Circles (take 1) (mono) 1:04
3. Green Circles (take 1 alt mix 1) (mono) 2:45
4. Anything (tracking session) (stereo) 3:46
5. Anything (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
6. Show Me The Way (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:09
7. Wit Art Yer (tracking session) (mono) 2:50
8. Wit Art Yer (backing track) (stereo) 2:27
9. I Can’t Make It (alt mix) (stereo) 2:26
10. Doolally (tracking session) (mono) 4:06
11. What’s It Called? (overdub session) (mono) 0:36
12. Call It Something Nice (take 9) (stereo) 2:04
13. Wide Eyed Girl (take 2) (stereo) 1:43
14. Wide Eyed Girl On The Wall (alt mix) (stereo) 3:28
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (stripped down mix) (stereo) 3:21
16. Red Balloon With A Blue Surprise (take 5) (stereo) 0:46
17. Red Balloon (alt mix) (stereo) 4:29
18. Saieide Mamoon (tracking session) (stereo) 9:36

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD3 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 2:

1. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (alt mix) (stereo) 3:22
2. I Can’t Make It (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:33
3. This Feeling Of Spring (take 1) (stereo) 1:43
4. All Our Yesterdays (backing track) (mono) 2:09
5. Talk To You (alt mix) (stereo) 2:22
6. Mind The Doors Please (mono) 5:01
7. Things Are Going To Get Better (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:43
8. Mad John (tracking session) (stereo) 3:58
9. A Collibosher (take 4) (stereo) 3:31
10. Lazy Sunday Afternoon (early mix) (mono) 3:00
11. Jack (backing track) (stereo) 3:35
12. Fred (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
13. Red Balloon (stripped down mix) (stereo) 1:33
14. Kolomodelomo (take 1) (stereo) 2:45
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (alt mix) (stereo) 3:34
16. Jenny’s Song (take 2) (stereo) 4:04

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD4 – Alternate Small Faces Outtakes & In Concert:

1. Itchycoo Park (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:50
2. Here Come The Nice (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 3:01
3. I’m Only Dreaming (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:23
4. Don’t Burst My Bubble (mono) 2:24
5. I Feel Much Better (stereo) 3:56
6. Green Circles (take 1 Italian version) (mono) 2:44*
7. Yesterday, Today And Tomorrow (alt mix) (stereo) 1:50*
8. Piccanniny (alt mix) (stereo) 3:02
9. Get Yourself Together (alt mix) (stereo) 2:18*
10. Eddie’s Dreaming (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:44*
11. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:08*
12. Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire (US alt mix) (mono) 2:00*
13. Afterglow Of Your Love (alt single version) (mono) 3:36*
14. (If You Think You’re) Groovy (mono) (The Lot Version)- P.P. Arnold & Small Faces 2:55
15. Me You And Us Too (mono) 3:32
16. The Universal (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:39
17. Rollin’ Over (live) (stereo) 2:29
18. If I Were A Carpenter (live) (stereo) 2:29
19. Every Little Bit Hurts (live) (stereo) 6:12
20. All Or Nothing (live) (stereo) 4:05
21. Tin Soldier (live) (stereo) 3:19

All tracks rare or * previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio and session master tapes.

Live tracks recorded at Newcastle City Hall 18th November 1968. Taken from Pye Studios master tape, pitch and speed corrected.

Small Faces Box set vinyl:

Small Faces Album Sampler – One-sided promo single – Excerpts From The Small Faces L.P. (mono)
The original 7″ vinyl was issued as a promotional single for the debut Immediate album. Featuring excepts from Get Yourself Together, Green Circles, Talk To You, All Our Yesterdays, Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire with DJ Tommy Vance announcements, the original vinyl has gone on to become the rarest Small Faces single amongst collectors.

Here Come The Nice – French E.P.
Here Come The Nice (mono) – This is the same performance as the regular ‘Here Come The Nice’ mixed to mono but similar to other releases at the time, was subjected to varispeed so plays slightly faster.

Talk To You (mono)
Become Like You (mono)
Get Yourself Together (mono)

Itchycoo Park – French E.P.
Itchycoo Park (mono)
I’m Onky Dreaming (mono)
Green Circles (mono)
Eddie’s Dreaming (mono)

Mystery – Replica acetate
Intended to be a single, a handful of acetates of Mystery were produced for the band and Andrew Loog Oldham to check the mix. For unknown reasons, the single wasn’t released, and Ronnie went back into Olympic to record a new vocal during April 1967 for the newly entitled Something I Want To Tell You. This is a replica of the acetate delivered to Andrew Loog Oldham back in 1967.

 

Box set

First Step

When vocalist Steve Marriott left to form Humble Pie, his three Small Faces bandmates regrouped with Jeff Beck Group axeman Ron Wood and singer Rod Stewart. With the name shortened to Faces, the U.K. quintet made an auspicious debut in 1970 with the album release “FIRST STEP”, a title that made sly reference to the beginner’s guide to guitar that Wood holds in the cover photo.

First Step was the first album by the then British group re named Faces, released in early 1970. The album was released only a few months after the Faces had formed from the ashes of the Small Faces (from which Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan hailed) and The Jeff Beck Group (from which Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood hailed.) The album is credited to the Small Faces on the cover , The album cover shows Ronnie Wood holding a copy of Geoffrey Sisley’s seminal guitar tutorial First Step: How to Play the Guitar Plectrum Style.

But there was nothing inexperienced about any of these musicians, and their chemistry and superb performances are evident on each of the 10 tracks. After an ace cover of Dylan’s “Wicked Messenger” the material is all original, with songwriting duties spread fairly evenly among the members; with a pair of instrumentals and such fine tracks as “Around the Plynth” Other highlights include Ronnie Lane’s folksy “Stone”, the hard-rocking “Shake, Shudder, Shiver”, “Three Button Hand Me Down” (on which both Lane and Wood play the bassline, affording the track a unique sonic quality in the Faces catalogue), and the soulful “Flying”.

it’s a consistently enjoyable collection. Faces were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012, and the journey that brought them there begins with FIRST STEP.

In August 2015, the album was reissued in a remastered and expanded form, including two previously-unreleased bonus tracks recorded shortly after the album’s release, “Behind the Sun” and “Mona the Blues” (although the latter was remade by Lane and Wood in 1972 for their Mahoney’s Last Stand film soundtrack).

“The ballsiest-sounding piece of full-length psychedelia to come out of England in 1968” Released: 24 May 1968

Marking a definitive break from Small Faces’ early mod and R&B underpinnings, the two-act Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake was a bold move into the realms of stylish psychedelia and the eccentric affectation of late ‘60s English invention. Although more than a hint of Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane’s Cockney humor was inescapable—the whimsical “Rene” and “Lazy Sunday” being obvious examples—two bold anthems, “Song of a Baker” and “Long Agos and Worlds Away,” predated Led Zeppelin’s arch bombast by several months. At the time, the round album cover, made to resemble a tobacco tin, and the sidelong gibberish of “Happiness Stan,” a pseudo fairytale narrated by English actor Stanley Unwin, also garnered plenty of attention. One of the first concept albums ever envisioned (and basically unplayable live), Ogden’s remains a little appreciated musical masterpiece. Small Faces would disband the following year.

The Small Faces were such an influential band during the time when when there were great changes going on in music, especially in the UK. Listen to Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake which was the culmination of that change from a completely record company controlled ‘group’ to a band who were experimenting with the technology available and under the influence of psychedelia. Side 2 of this album featured a cockney themed story through narrative by Professor Stanley Unwin and songs which may not be to everyone’s taste. Song Of A Baker is a real highlight. The fairy tale follows Stan in his quest to find the missing half of the moon, after seeing a half-moon in the sky one night. Along the way, he saves a fly from starvation, and in gratitude the insect tells him of someone who can answer his question and also tell him the philosophy of life itself. With magic power,Stan intones, “If all the flies were one fly, what a great enormous fly-follolloper that would bold,” and the fly grows to gigantic proportions. Seated on the giant fly’s back, Stan takes a psychedelic journey to the cave of Mad John the Hermit, who explains that the moon’s disappearance is only temporary, and demonstrates by pointing out that Stan has spent so long on his quest that the moon is now full again. He then sings Stan a cheerful song about the meaning of life.

The album was originally released on vinyl in a circular novelty package of a metal replica of a giant tobacco tin, inside which was a poster created with five connected paper circles with pictures of the band members. This proved too expensive and not successful as the tins tended to roll off of shelves and it was quickly followed by a paper/card replica with a gatefold cover. There have been Two limited-edition CD releases (including a three-disc deluxe edition in 2006 that included the original mono mix of the album on CD for the first time) went even further by packaging the disc(s) in a circular tin (as the original vinyl release had). 

Small Faces
  • Steve Marriott − lead, harmony, and backing vocals, guitars, harmonica, piano on “Happiness Stan” and “Every Little Bit Hurts”, Hammond organ on “Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake”, bass guitar on “The Journey”, shared lead vocals on “The Hungry Intruder” and “HappyDaysToyTown”
  • Ronnie Lane − harmony and backing vocals, bass guitar, electric guitar on “The Journey”, upright bass on “Mad John”, lead vocals on “Song of a Baker” and “The Journey”, shared lead vocals on “The Hungry Intruder” and “HappyDaysToyTown”
  • Kenney Jones − backing vocals, drums, percussion
  • Ian McLagan − harmony and backing vocals, keyboards, electric guitar and bass guitar on “Long Agos and Worlds Apart”, lead vocals on “Long Agos and Worlds Apart”

With:

  • Stanley Unwin – “looney links”
  • Glyn Johns – recording engineer

The award-winning artwork for the album cover was done by Nick Tweddell and Pete Brown, who were art school friends of Ian Mclagan

Released: May 24th

The backstory goes that this was recorded — at least partially — when Rod Stewart failed to show up for various 1972 Faces’ sessions. The rest of that band, along with some high profile players such as horn men Bobby Keys and Jim Price, Pete Townshend, and Family’s (later Blind Faith’s) Rick Grech among others, recorded tracks which were spliced into the titular film. The movie was never given a proper theatrical release, but the soundtrack was finally made available on vinyl in an inauspicious 1976 release that quickly went out of print. 

While the music, much of it instrumental reflecting the nonchalant sessions, isn’t always compelling, it’s consistently listenable. Given the iffy circumstances of its creation, these (mostly) jams catch fire more often than not. And the sheer quality of the names involved, most of which were arguably at the height of their powers, make even the most unfocused moments worth hearing.

Veteran producer Glyn Johns likely edited the music into shorter spurts, keeping the best bits so even the more directionless improvisations such as “Car Radio” blast out with a scrappy yet inviting energy. Acoustic flashes such as “Hay Tumble” featuring Grech’s fiddle, along with “Woody’s Thing” and the bluesy country honk of “Rooster’s Funeral” spotlighting Wood’s slide work capture a rambunctious vitality comparable to the first four Rod Stewart albums and the Faces’ at their peak. Some selections such as the unpromisingly named “Title One” sound like background music to a typical 70’s TV cop show, albeit above average for that scenario. The swampy slow blues of “Mona the Blues,” one of the vocals, which contains biting slide guitar from Wood is a lost gem. Along with Ronnie Lane’s heartbreaking, lovely roots folk/pop “Just for a Moment” — also included in an instrumental version — they justify the price of this labor-of-love remastered reissue. Freshly penned liner notes fill in the blanks about both the obscure movie and its music, but get out the magnifying glass to read the individual track credits, reprinted in frustratingly tiny type.

Those familiar with Ronnie Lane and Pete Townshend’s far superior Rough Mix or the instrumental “Apple Jam” sessions tacked onto George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass will hear and appreciate similarities in this disc’s freewheeling pieces.

Mahoney’s Last Stand may not be a lost classic, but for fans inclined towards the music of Wood, Lane, Stewart and the Faces during these years, it’s undoubtedly enjoyable and a minor delight to have back in print.

There are very few albums which are indispensable. The Beatles Revolver, Stones Exile on Maine Street and the like. For me, truly great records capture a moment.

The Faces‘ third album from 1971, came in the middle of a whirlwind year for singer Rod Stewart.  In the mere months that separated the album “Long Player” and “A Nod Is As Good As A Wink” Stewart had a huge hit with “Maggie May” and his first No. 1 solo album (‘Every Picture Tells a Story’) his third solo album was something that would soon irreparably damage the band, but at the time it was mere good fortune, helping bring them some collateral success that they deserved. Certainly, it didn’t change the character of the album itself, which is the tightest record the band ever made. Granted that may be a relative term, since sloppiness is at the heart of this band, but this doesn’t feel cobbled together, (which the otherwise excellent Long Player did).

‘A Nod Is as Good as a Wink .finally gave the group their long-awaited hit single in “Stay with Me,” . Loose, bluesy and boozy, rock ‘n’ roll doesn’t get more natural than this. The Faces and solo Rod Stewart were never as good as this before or since. From the opening ‘Miss Judy’s Farm’ which is awesome, the songs just get better and better. Their interpretation of Chuck Berry’s Memphis Tenessee followed by ‘Too Bad’ will make you feel grateful that you’re alive. Ending with the rampaging good times of “That’s All You Need.” In between, Ronnie Lane serves up dirty jokes the exquisitely funny “You’re So Rude”  and heartbreaking ballads (the absolutely beautiful “Debris” , and generally serves up a nonstop party. There are few records that feel like a never-ending party like this seventies album , the slow moments are for slow dancing, and as soon as it’s over, it’s hard not to want to do it all over again. It’s another classic –

They were helped in that respect by new co-producer Glyn Johns, who came in as an impartial outside set of ears while helping to wrangle the unruly band members into recording shape. It couldn’t have been the easiest gig, but it’s easy to understand why Johns was attracted to it — aside from Stewart’s formidable vocals, the group boasted the prodigious talents of keyboardist Ian McLagan , drummer Kenney Jones and perpetually underrated bassist and great songwriter Ronnie Lane .

With Johns helping the Faces were brought more attentively to bear on some of their finest material. While public perception was increasingly focused on Stewart, the new album titled A Nod Is As Good As a Wink … to a Blind Horse — presented the band at their creatively democratic best. Of the eight originals they lined up for the LP, the majority were co-written, with Lane, McLagan, Stewart and Wood all having a hand in the record’s compositional makeup. As Lane recalled in the years after its release, Nod captured a group firing on all cylinders.

Side One
1. “Miss Judy’s Farm” (Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood) – 3:42
2. “You’re So Rude” (Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan) – 3:46
3. “Love Lives Here” (Lane, Stewart, Wood) – 3:09
4. “Last Orders Please” (Lane) – 2:38
5. “Stay with Me” (Stewart, Wood) – 4:42

Side Two

1. “Debris” (Lane) 4:39
2. “Memphis, Tennessee” Incorrectly titled on original US pressings of the album as simply “Memphis” (Chuck Berry) – 5:31
3. “Too Bad” (Stewart, Wood) – 3:16
4. “That’s All You Need” (Stewart, Wood) – 5:05

PERSONNEL
ROD STEWART – vocals
RONNIE LANE – bass, acoustic guitar, percussion, vocals
RONNIE WOOD – lead, slide, acoustic and pedal steel guitars, backing vocals on “Too Bad”, harmonica
IAN McLAGAN – piano, organ, backing vocals “Too Bad”
KENNEY JONES – drums, percussion
HARRY FOWLER – steel drums on “That’s All You Need”
GLYN JOHNS – co-producer, engineer
PRODUCED BY FACES AND GLYN JOHNS

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The story goes that Ronnie Lane’s Slim Chance were formed after he walked into a bar after the last ever Faces show in June of 73 and shouted at Marc Bolan asking if he had an opening for an unemployed bass player. Bolan did not take him up on the offer and he retreated to his farm in Wales to begin putting together a new band called Slim Chance. The sound was mainly acoustic driven over flowing with warmth and quality and revealed the heart and soul of one of Britain’s most under rated songwriters. During his time with The Faces, Lane’s talents shone with songs he penned like ‘Just For A Moment’, Ooh La La and ‘Debris’. Eschewing the rock sound of his era, Ronnie Lane created a personal organic sound, propelled by melody and mandolins, violins and squeeze boxes, the sound that conjures up the sun at dawn and the beauty of the fading afternoon horizon.

Lane would record four solo albums with Slim Chance plus albums with Ronnie Wood, Mahoney’s Last Stand & Pete Townshend Rough Mix. In 1976 he briefly joined a re-formed Small Faces but quit after two weeks and again teamed up with Steve Marriott in 1981 to cut an album called the Magic Mijits album. Contracting MS in 1982, he kept going and in a massive showing of affection by his musical contemporaries a benefit show for MS charity was put together featuring Eric Clapton, Pete Townshend, Steve Winwood, Jimmy Page, Charlie Watts, and Andy Fairweather Low and raised millions for the charity. Ooh La La. An Island Harvest looks at Ronnie and Slim Chance’s time with Island Records where Ronnie released two albums – Ronnie Lane’s Slim Chance and One for The Road.

This collection features highlights from those albums as well as covers of classic tracks delivered in the inimitable “Plonk” style. Tracks such as ‘Tin and Tambourine’ , ‘One For the Road’ and ‘Burnin’ Summer’ showcase Ronnie’s beautiful melodies and imaginative lyrics. It is easy to see why Lane was and still is admired by so many. The collection also unearths some previously unreleased alternate takes of classic Ronnie compositions such as Ooh La La, The Poacher and Anniversary. Also included is the “BBC In concert” Ronnie performed in 1974 which features Faces classics as well as a rip roaring version of How Come and a cover of Gallagher and Lyle’s I Believe In You who were part of the original Slim Chance line up and incidentally perform alongside Ronnie at this concert.

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Ronnie Lane And Slim Chance 00:00 Ooh La La (Altern Studio Take 4) (Ronnie Lane, Ron Wood) – 3.15 03:15 Don’t Try And Change My Mind – 3.05 06:20 One For The Road – 4.44 11:04 Buddy Can You Spare Me A Dime (Altern Studio Version) Gorney, Yip Harburg) – 4.07 15:11 Steppin’ And Reelin’ – 6.24 21:35 Harvest Home (Charlie Hart, Ronnie Lane) – 5.48 27:23 32nd Street – 4.34 31:57 Give Me A Penny – 3.01 34:54 I’m Gonna Sit Right Down (Altern Studio Take) (Fred E. Ahlert, Joe Young) – 3.10 38:02 You Never Can Tell (Take 1) (Chuck Berry) – 6.59 44:58 Back Street Boy (Jam Version) – 4.57 49:53 Snake – 3.30 53:21 Burnin’ Summer – 4.07 57:26 Anniversary – 3.00 1:00:24 Country Boy (Altern Take) (Marshall Barer, Fred Brooks) – 3.34 1:03:55 What Went Down (That Night With You) – 3.29 1:07:21 Tin And Tambourine (Kathy Lambert, Ronnie Lane) – 4.12 1:11:31 Little Piece Of Nothing – 2.26 1:13:53 The Poacher (Take 2) – 3.51 1:17:41 Street Gang (Ronnie Lane, Ruan O’Lochlainn, Steve Simpson) – 4.08 1:21:46 Nobody’s Listenin’ – 3.57 1:25:39 Stone – 4.10 1:29:47 G’morning – 4.02 1:33:47 Bottle Of Brandy (Isaacs Family) – 2.50 1:36:33 Single Saddle (Arthur Altman, Hal David) – 2.03 1:38:33 Lovely – 3.29 1:41:59 Ain’t No Lady (Kathy Lambert, Ronnie Lane, Ruan O’Lochlainn) – 4.26 1:46:22 Blue Monday (Dave Bartholomew) – 4.09 1:50:30 Anniversary (Altern Mix) – 3.07

(BBC In Concert) 1:53:35 Last Orders- 4.26 1:58:01 Done This One Before – 3.58 2:01:59 Flags And Banners (Ronnie Lane, Rod Stewart) – 4.06 2:06:05 Tell Everyone – 3.40 2:09:45 How Come – 3.55 2:13:40 I Believe In You (Bernard Gallagher, Graham Lyle) – 4.53 2:18:33 Debris – 6.29 2:25:02 Ooh La La (Ronnie Lane, Ron Wood) – 3.48 All songs written by Ronnie Lane unless as else noted.

Ronnie Lane passed away on June 4th, 1997 at the age of 51 . He had stars in his eyes and love in his smile. Story by Paolo Hewitt

What a great track Ooh La La is a song from The Faces. The song was written by Ronnie Lane and Ronnie Wood and sung by Wood. That is strange because The Faces had one of the best lead singers around at the time…Rod Stewart. Stewart by this time was soaring as a solo artist and his interest in the Faces was waning. He claimed the song was not in his key to sing. He did do vocals for it then and Lane but Wood ended up singing the released version.

The Faces had one big hit…Stay With Me but this song is their greatest song to me. Rod Stewart finally covered the song in 1998 for a tribute to Ronnie Lane. Ronnie Lane did his own version with his band Slim Chance. Ronnie Wood also does it live in solo shows. A song between Granddad and Son about the ways of love. The song never ages because the subject matter never changes and it is continually passed along. The song creates an atmosphere and Wood not known for his singing ability did a great job on this one.

This week in 1973: The Faces scored their first UK #1 album with their final studio release, ‘Ooh La La’, on Warner Bros. Records; with his career in the stratosphere due to the success of his solo albums, Rod Stewart had became increasingly distanced from his bandmates by the time of this recording; produced by Glyn Johns, highlights included “Silicone Grown”, “Cindy Incidentally” & the raucous yet bittersweet album closer “Ooh La La”, featuring the only-ever Faces lead vocal from guitarist Ronnie Wood; the album cover is a photo of Gastone’, a stage character of 1920s Italian comedian Ettore Petrolini, originally designed in such a way that when the top edge was pressed down Gastone’s eyes would discolour & move to the side, while his jaw dropped into a leering smile…

1. Silicone Grown 0:00
2. Cindy Incidentally 3:06
3. Flags And Banners 5:43
4. My Fault 7:45
5. Borstal Boys 10:54
6. Fly In The Onitment 13:48
7. If I’m On The Late Side 17:39
8. Glad And Sorry 20:19
9. Just Another Honky 23:23
10. Ooh La La 27:00

The complete Faces album released in 1973 including many of their best songs. I would say it’s their best studio album.