Posts Tagged ‘The Small Faces’

Remember The Face: Steve Marriott

Today is a poignant landmark for admirers of one of the UK’s most charismatic and distinctive rock frontman, as it’s exactly 25 years since we lost Steve Marriott. The former leader of the Small Faces and Humble Pie died in a house fire on 20th April, 1991, at the cruelly young age of 44.
Thankfully, Steve’s achievements as a true figurehead of pop and rock music, especially in the 1960s and ’70s, are now widely acknowledged. His talents are currently being celebrated at London’s Vaults Theatre, in the highly recommended musical All Or Nothing The Mod Musical, which brings the Small Faces‘ story vividly to life.

Marriott, was from Manor Park in east London, was a born performer, starting his first band at the age of 12 and starring on the West End stage in Lionel Bart’s hit production of Oliver! at just 13 years old. Further stage roles followed, but as All Or Nothing documents, his heart was always in music.

His dreams came true when the Small Faces, formed in 1965, made it big and enjoyed several years of hit singles and increasingly influential and experimental albums. Marriott’s wanderlust and disillusionment with the business of music led him to leave the band and form Humble Pie.

Humble Pie

There, he developed a creative partnership with a new group of like-minded players, including Peter Frampton. “It was the best band you could ever be in as far as I was concerned,” said Frampton, “because you’ve got my idol there. Steve would open his mouth and gold came out.”

Marriott fronted Humble Pie from 1969 to 1975, and briefly in a reunited version in the early 1980s. He also made some notable albums in his own name, including the 1976 solo debut Marriott. 1990’s Marriott & Band included versions of his treasured Small Faces songs ‘All Or Nothing’ and ‘What’cha Gonna Do About It.’

Shortly before the end of his life, Marriott was interviewed by Paul Sexton, and reflected with quiet satisfaction on his career. “I was seduced at 18,” he said, “and it was quite good but it paled very quickly. I realised it had nothing to do with music and everything to do with the shape of your bum…what’s been has gone, and I’m very proud of it.

“I’ve got what I wanted, which is just enough money to live on, in no great style but a nice way, and to have some respect from other musicians and play the pubs and clubs, where the music’s still real.”

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‘Here Come The Nice’ is the ultimate, indispensible tribute to Swinging London’s finest and best-loved pop heroes! The Small Faces the set includes.
4 CDs | 75 songs remastered from the original tapes | 72-page hardback book, lavishly illustrated | Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia | Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews | 3 rare singles in red, white & blue vinyl | Olympic Studios 7-inch replica acetate | 64-page softcover illustrated lyric book | Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set | 5 postcards with rare photos & artwork | Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake facsimile press kit | 2 large-size reproduction posters | 2 exclusive Gered Mankowitz fine art prints
Written contributions from Robert PlantPaul WellerDavid BowieNick MasonPeter FramptonChris RobinsonGlen MatlockChad SmithPaul Stanley & many more.

“In forensic detail and with a sleevenote by Pete Townshend, this 4-CD box rights the wrongs wreaked on Marriot & Lane, McLagan and Jones’s peak years.”
MOJO

“The Mod scamps’ best work, finally given due respect.”
UNCUT

“It’s the package of the year, beautifully crafted for the Small Faces fanatic in all of us.”
GOLDMINE (USA)

“An impeccable monument to the greatest pop group this country ever produced.”
SHINDIG!

“Now at last, this massive box set finally set’s to rights not only the band’s legacy but also the actual sounds created. Beautifully presented, meticulously researched and annotated this is the only Small Faces recording you will ever need…” 
TOTAL MUSIC MAGAZINE

“Lavish, four-CD retrospective includes unreleased material, out-takes, and alternate versions. Sheds new light on an extraordinary pop experiment.” 
8/10 – 2-page review by Paul Moody
CLASSIC ROCK – April 2014

In celebration of the Small Faces’ induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, Charly Records are proud to present ‘Here Come The Nice’, a deluxe heavyweight 4 CD box set chronicling the group’s career on Andrew Loog Oldham’s pioneering Immediate Records label, curated by surviving band members Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan.

A whopping 75 songs includes every hit single, A & B side released worldwide on Immediate Records plus a generous bounty of unreleased material, outtakes, early and alternate versions, live tracks and previously unheard recording sessions from Olympic, Trident and IBC Studios, all sourced and remastered from recently discovered original master and multitrack tapes.

The lavish 72-page hardback book, with a heartfelt foreword by Pete Townshend and introduction by Kenney and Mac, is full of previously unseen photos and rare memorabilia, a career overview by esteemed Mojo magazine scribe Mark Paytress, The box is crammed full with exclusive extras, such as replicas of three of the rarest Small Faces EPs in colored vinyl, an impossibly rare Olympic Studios acetate, large-size repro posters, fine art prints, 64-page fully illustrated lyric booklet, collectors postcards and more, all paying testament to the enduring musical genius of the Small Faces. www.thesmallfaces.com

What’s In The Box?

Lavishly illustrated 72 page hardbound coffee table book: 
Introduction by Kenney & Mac plus a foreword by Pete Townshend.
Over 90 classic, rare & previously unpublished photos & memorabilia.
Definitive sleeve notes include new & archive interviews.
Exclusive Gered Mankowitz interview on photographing ‘Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake’.

Track-by-track illustrated guide to every song on the box set.

Lyric Booklet: 
64-page fully illustrated song booklet with rare photos & memorabilia.
Complete lyrics transcribed & endorsed by band members for the first time ever.

Red, white and blue coloured vinyl: 
Three replica 7-inch EPs of the rarest Small Faces vinyl originally released in 1967:
Small Faces album sampler – Excerpts from the Small Faces LP.
Here Come The Nice 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.
Itchycoo Park 4 song French EP in picture sleeve.

Replica Studio Acetate:
Olympic Sound Studios one-off acetate pressing for Andrew Loog-Oldham for the song Mystery.

Two large reproduction posters: 
Reproductions of original posters for the Tin Soldier single featuring photography by Gered Mankowitz 
Newcastle City Hall live concert from 1968.

Press kit for Ogden’s Gone Nut Flake: 
Rare 6-panel Immediate Records Press Kit from 1968.

Double sided postcards: 
Five collector’s edition postcards with rare photos of each Small Faces band member backed with memorabilia from the Immediate Records Archive.

Fine art prints: 
Two beautiful prints provided by Gered Mankowitz from his 1967 Itchycoo Park photo sessions.

CD1 – Small Faces Singles Worldwide As Bs & Eps:

1. Here Come The Nice (mono) 2:55
2. Talk To You (mono) 2:05
3. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (mono) 2:15
4. Something I Want To Tell You (mono) 2:07
5. Get Yourself Together (mono) 2:16
6. Become Like You (mono) 1:56
7. Green Circles (mono) 2:32
8. Eddie’s Dreaming (b-side edit) (mono) 2:41
9. Itchycoo Park (mono) 2:44
10. I’m Only Dreaming (mono) 2:22
11. Tin Soldier (mono) 3:19
12. I Feel Much Better (mono) 3:55
13. Lazy Sunday (mono) 3:02
14. Rollin’ Over (Part II of Happiness Stan) (mono) 2:12
15. Mad John (single version) (mono) 2:07
16. The Journey (single version) (mono) 2:51
17. The Universal (mono) 2:42
18. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (mono) 2:47
19. Afterglow Of Your Love (single version) (mono) 3:22
20. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (mono) 3:18

Original Immediate single versions. Taken from original mono master tapes.

CD2 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 1:

1. Shades Of Green (mono) 0:38
2. Green Circles (take 1) (mono) 1:04
3. Green Circles (take 1 alt mix 1) (mono) 2:45
4. Anything (tracking session) (stereo) 3:46
5. Anything (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
6. Show Me The Way (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:09
7. Wit Art Yer (tracking session) (mono) 2:50
8. Wit Art Yer (backing track) (stereo) 2:27
9. I Can’t Make It (alt mix) (stereo) 2:26
10. Doolally (tracking session) (mono) 4:06
11. What’s It Called? (overdub session) (mono) 0:36
12. Call It Something Nice (take 9) (stereo) 2:04
13. Wide Eyed Girl (take 2) (stereo) 1:43
14. Wide Eyed Girl On The Wall (alt mix) (stereo) 3:28
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (stripped down mix) (stereo) 3:21
16. Red Balloon With A Blue Surprise (take 5) (stereo) 0:46
17. Red Balloon (alt mix) (stereo) 4:29
18. Saieide Mamoon (tracking session) (stereo) 9:36

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD3 – Small Faces In The Studio – Olympic, IBC & Trident Sessions – Part 2:

1. Wham Bam Thank You Mam (alt mix) (stereo) 3:22
2. I Can’t Make It (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:33
3. This Feeling Of Spring (take 1) (stereo) 1:43
4. All Our Yesterdays (backing track) (mono) 2:09
5. Talk To You (alt mix) (stereo) 2:22
6. Mind The Doors Please (mono) 5:01
7. Things Are Going To Get Better (stripped down mix) (stereo) 2:43
8. Mad John (tracking session) (stereo) 3:58
9. A Collibosher (take 4) (stereo) 3:31
10. Lazy Sunday Afternoon (early mix) (mono) 3:00
11. Jack (backing track) (stereo) 3:35
12. Fred (backing track) (stereo) 3:06
13. Red Balloon (stripped down mix) (stereo) 1:33
14. Kolomodelomo (take 1) (stereo) 2:45
15. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass (alt mix) (stereo) 3:34
16. Jenny’s Song (take 2) (stereo) 4:04

All tracks previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio multitrack and session master tapes

CD4 – Alternate Small Faces Outtakes & In Concert:

1. Itchycoo Park (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:50
2. Here Come The Nice (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 3:01
3. I’m Only Dreaming (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:23
4. Don’t Burst My Bubble (mono) 2:24
5. I Feel Much Better (stereo) 3:56
6. Green Circles (take 1 Italian version) (mono) 2:44*
7. Yesterday, Today And Tomorrow (alt mix) (stereo) 1:50*
8. Piccanniny (alt mix) (stereo) 3:02
9. Get Yourself Together (alt mix) (stereo) 2:18*
10. Eddie’s Dreaming (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:44*
11. (Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me (take 2 alt mix) (stereo) 2:08*
12. Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire (US alt mix) (mono) 2:00*
13. Afterglow Of Your Love (alt single version) (mono) 3:36*
14. (If You Think You’re) Groovy (mono) (The Lot Version)- P.P. Arnold & Small Faces 2:55
15. Me You And Us Too (mono) 3:32
16. The Universal (take 1 stereo mix) (stereo) 2:39
17. Rollin’ Over (live) (stereo) 2:29
18. If I Were A Carpenter (live) (stereo) 2:29
19. Every Little Bit Hurts (live) (stereo) 6:12
20. All Or Nothing (live) (stereo) 4:05
21. Tin Soldier (live) (stereo) 3:19

All tracks rare or * previously unreleased versions. Taken from original studio and session master tapes.

Live tracks recorded at Newcastle City Hall 18th November 1968. Taken from Pye Studios master tape, pitch and speed corrected.

Small Faces Box set vinyl:

Small Faces Album Sampler – One-sided promo single – Excerpts From The Small Faces L.P. (mono)
The original 7″ vinyl was issued as a promotional single for the debut Immediate album. Featuring excepts from Get Yourself Together, Green Circles, Talk To You, All Our Yesterdays, Up The Wooden Hills To Bedfordshire with DJ Tommy Vance announcements, the original vinyl has gone on to become the rarest Small Faces single amongst collectors.

Here Come The Nice – French E.P.
Here Come The Nice (mono) – This is the same performance as the regular ‘Here Come The Nice’ mixed to mono but similar to other releases at the time, was subjected to varispeed so plays slightly faster.

Talk To You (mono)
Become Like You (mono)
Get Yourself Together (mono)

Itchycoo Park – French E.P.
Itchycoo Park (mono)
I’m Onky Dreaming (mono)
Green Circles (mono)
Eddie’s Dreaming (mono)

Mystery – Replica acetate
Intended to be a single, a handful of acetates of Mystery were produced for the band and Andrew Loog Oldham to check the mix. For unknown reasons, the single wasn’t released, and Ronnie went back into Olympic to record a new vocal during April 1967 for the newly entitled Something I Want To Tell You. This is a replica of the acetate delivered to Andrew Loog Oldham back in 1967.

 

Box set

First Step

When vocalist Steve Marriott left to form Humble Pie, his three Small Faces bandmates regrouped with Jeff Beck Group axeman Ron Wood and singer Rod Stewart. With the name shortened to Faces, the U.K. quintet made an auspicious debut in 1970 with the album release “FIRST STEP”, a title that made sly reference to the beginner’s guide to guitar that Wood holds in the cover photo.

First Step was the first album by the then British group re named Faces, released in early 1970. The album was released only a few months after the Faces had formed from the ashes of the Small Faces (from which Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan hailed) and The Jeff Beck Group (from which Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood hailed.) The album is credited to the Small Faces on the cover , The album cover shows Ronnie Wood holding a copy of Geoffrey Sisley’s seminal guitar tutorial First Step: How to Play the Guitar Plectrum Style.

But there was nothing inexperienced about any of these musicians, and their chemistry and superb performances are evident on each of the 10 tracks. After an ace cover of Dylan’s “Wicked Messenger” the material is all original, with songwriting duties spread fairly evenly among the members; with a pair of instrumentals and such fine tracks as “Around the Plynth” Other highlights include Ronnie Lane’s folksy “Stone”, the hard-rocking “Shake, Shudder, Shiver”, “Three Button Hand Me Down” (on which both Lane and Wood play the bassline, affording the track a unique sonic quality in the Faces catalogue), and the soulful “Flying”.

it’s a consistently enjoyable collection. Faces were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012, and the journey that brought them there begins with FIRST STEP.

In August 2015, the album was reissued in a remastered and expanded form, including two previously-unreleased bonus tracks recorded shortly after the album’s release, “Behind the Sun” and “Mona the Blues” (although the latter was remade by Lane and Wood in 1972 for their Mahoney’s Last Stand film soundtrack).

Smallfacestinsoldier.jpg

“Tin Soldier” is a song released by the rock band Small Faces on 2 December 1967, written by Steve Marriott (credited to Marriott/Lane). The song peaked at number nine in the UK singles chart.

The song is a superb example of the power of Steve Marriott’s lead vocals ranging from the quietness of the verse to the more raunchy choruses. It is also a track that features Ian McLagan at his best with the opening swirls of keyboards.
“Tin Soldier” was originally written by Steve Marriott for singer P.P. Arnold, but Marriott liked the song so much he then kept it himself. It was a song that he wrote to his first wife, Jenny Rylance. P.P. Arnold can be heard singing backing vocals on the song. The song signialled a return to the band’s R&B roots whilst continuing their forays into psychedelic rock and other musical experiments. When Tin Soldier was released the BBC informed the band that the last line of the song had to be removed from all TV and radio broadcasts, mistakenly believing that Marriott sang “sleep with you”, when in fact the lyric is “sit with you”. Marriott explained that the song was about getting into someone’s mind—not their body. Tin Soldier reached number nine in the UK Singles Chart and remains one of Small Faces‘ best known songs.

In 1997, some 30 years after the song’s original release, The Rock magazine Mojo voted “Tin Soldier” the tenth best single of all time, in a readers’ poll. The poll placed the song ahead of anything by The Who or The Rolling Stones. The song has also been much mentioned over the years by Paul Weller and featured in Noel Gallagher’s personal all-time top ten song list.

The meaning of the song is about getting into somebody’s mind—not their body. It refers to a girl (Jenny Rylance) I used to talk to all the time and she really gave me a buzz. The single was to give her a buzz in return and maybe other people as well. I dig it. There’s no great message really and no physical scenes.

Small Faces
Steve Marriott – lead and backing vocals, acoustic and electric guitars
Ronnie Lane – bass guitar, backing vocals
Ian McLagan – acoustic and electric pianos, Hammond organ, backing vocals
Kenney Jones – drums
Additional personnel
P.P. Arnold – backing vocals

steve marritt

 

Steve Marriott was one of the UK’s great Rock Vocalists and frontman of two of the UK’s most well-known bands, Steve passed away this day April 20th in 1991 after a house fire at his home, remembered for his powerful original singing voice and as a guitarist with bands like the “Small Faces” and the rock band “Humble Pie” his aggressive guitar playing, also in the early days of his career he became an icon for the Mod era due to his dress style, this is just one of the best songs ever and as its Easter Sunday this song is so applicable, the song was inspired by Marriott’s rowing with his neighbours and sung in an exaggerated cockney accent culled from the classic circular released album “Ogdens Nut Flake”, Its understood that the track “Parklife” by Blur was inspired by this song.