Posts Tagged ‘Juliana Hatfield’

Blake Babies "Innocence and Experience" Vinyl Reissue *PRE-ORDER*

American Laundromat Recordings We are beyond excited to reissue this fantastic Blake Babies collection on vinyl. It’s always been a favorite and we worked with John, Freda and Juliana on every aspect of the reissue.

The title is a reference to the William Blake collection of poems Songs of Innocence and of Experience.

Perched right on the edge of genuine stardom thanks to the critical adoration of 1990’s Sunburn and the general sea change heralded by the commercial success of Nirvana and other alt rockers, the Blake Babies chose instead to break up. It was nothing personal; John P. Strohm and Freda Boner were homesick for Indiana and Juliana Hatfield didn’t want to leave Boston. That sort of casualness typified the band throughout their brief existence, and indeed, it’s a huge part of their charm. Coyly taking their name from the most famous book of poetry by their name’s inspiration, Innocence and Experience is a similarly off-the-cuff collection. Less a full-career overview than a collection of rarities, favorite tracks, and demos, the 14-track collection hits all of the group’s releases, paying particular attention to Sunburn and its immediate predecessor, 1989’s Earwig. It has some faults as a retrospective, but it does hit almost all of the high points (Earwig’s “Take Your Head off My Shoulder” and Sunburn’s “Look Away” are the most egregious omissions) and the demos are interestingly different from the more familiar versions. Also of interest to Hatfield fans is the inclusion of “Boiled Potato,” the rarity that Hatfield would rework as the anorexia metaphor “Feed Me” on her 1992 EP I See You.

Our good friend and long-time collaborator Sean Glonek at SRG Studios handled remastering, Carl Saff in Chicago cut metal, and vinyl was pressed by hand at Burlington Record Plant in Burlington, VT. The artwork is recreated from the original Mammoth art but with a little twist thanks to the skill and creativity of award-winning designer Aaron Tanner of Melodic Virtue. We also included the liner notes and photos from the original CD booklet as a newly-designed inner sleeve. We’re very proud of this reissue and hope you enjoy it.

Band members

  • Juliana Hatfield – vocals, guitars, bass, piano and keyboards
  • John Strohm – vocals, guitars, bass and keyboards
  • Freda Love Smith – vocals and drums

 

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Sometime earlier this summer, Juliana Hatfield was shredding alongside waste treatment machinery on Deer Island, and it was freakin’ awesome. Amidst a million subtle shades of pink and surprisingly industrial imagery, Hatfield’s new video, “Lost Ship”, paints her as the take-no-BS Boston woman we’ve always known her to be.

“No one has any power over me,” she sings, which she quickly follows with “I wanna ride on a spaceship in my mind,” both lyrics that recall her steadfast agency and desire to peace the hell out.

The next taste of her forthcoming 2019 record Weird, Hatfield’s video for “Lost Ship” was filmed on Massachusetts’ Deer Island earlier this year. With a little more than a month to go until Weird debuts on American Laundromat Records to be released in January, from the former Blake Babies member .

“Rachel Lichtman of the awesome Network 77 hipped me to this place called Deer Island in Winthrop, Massachusetts and we shot the video there,” she says . “It’s right in my backyard, practically, but I had never been there before. It was such a cool sci-fi setting, with the wind and those gigantic egg-shaped structures which are part of the waste treatment facility out there. Rachel made this a beautiful haunting video.”

Echoing Hatfield’s cut-off-from-the-world’s sentiments of Weird, director Rachel Lichtman honed in on her blissfully alone beauty for the video’s imagery.

“I feel like Juliana and I created something that so beautifully captures the powerful freedom of the chosen isolation described in ‘Lost Ship,’” Lichtman explains. “Juliana seems a futuristic goddess, luxuriously alone, atop what looks like the remnants of the industrialized world; she’s not bothered or indebted or compromised. We shot it just the two of us on the last warm day of summer, and I think that energy translates through and captures the essence of this brilliant song.”

“Lost Ship” by Juliana Hatfield from the album “Weird” out January 18th, 2019 on American Laundromat Records.

Juliana Hatfield Indulges Her Sweet Tooth on New Olivia Newton-John Covers Album

In song, as in romance, one never forgets their first love. No matter how cheesy or childish it may seem later, the memory of that initial encounter with the music’s emotional power never goes away. For Juliana Hatfield, it was Olivia Newton-John.

But Hatfield never committed the betrayal that most of us are guilty of. She never spurned her middle-school crush when she got to high school. Hatfield stayed true to Newton-John. She embraced punk rock as an older adolescent, but did not turn her back on the Australian singer of “Have You Ever Been Mellow.” And it’s that combination of illusion-grinding guitars and heart-on-the-sleeve pop tunes that has made Juliana Hatfield one of the most rewarding and underrated artists in the indie-rock generation.

“For my whole career, without consciously realizing it, I’ve been trying to integrate Olivia and X, the sweet pop and the messy punk. I’ve always had those two sides to me, not only in what I play but also in what I listen to. I veer back and forth like a pendulum.”

“Even when I fell in love with the band X,” Hatfield explains, “I never lost my love for Olivia. I never hid it. Different parts of my personality are drawn to different musics. The angry part of me is attracted to more aggressive music and more aggressive performances, like Exene’s voice, or more humor maybe, like The Replacements and Devo. The idealistic part of me is drawn to melodies and harmonies, like Olivia’s singing. For me it’s fine to like Olivia Newton-John and a band like Black Flag.”

So far from hiding her first musical love, Hatfield is celebrating it on the new album Juliana Hatfield Sings Olivia Newton-John, on American Laundromat Records. With her longtime rock ‘n’ roll rhythm section of drummer Pete Caldes and bassist Ed Valauskas, Hatfield remakes 13 of Newton-John’s songs (one of them in two different mixes), including seven singles that reached the U.S. pop top 10. Hatfield scuffs them up a little but not so much that they lose their essential, sweetness.

Hatfield was 10 years old, living in the Boston suburb of Duxbury, when the movie Grease and its soundtrack were released in 1978. She was fascinated by the character of Sandy, played by Newton-John, an exchange student from Australia and a goody-good girl who falls for the greaser bad boy Danny, played by John Travolta. Like the fifth-grader Hatfield, Sandy was essentially a rule-abiding girl who was attracted to the rule-breaking world of juvenile delinquents and rock music. Hatfield took her cue from a role model who was able to cross that boundary without compromising her principles.

“When I was a kid,” Hatfield recalls, “I just related to Olivia’s sense of innocence, especially when she was singing. I even had a friend curl my hair so I looked like Sandy. I like to think that Sandy was putting on that bad-girl persona as a goof, because she realized that this was just a game that people play. I don’t like to think she put on a mask just to get the guy. I didn’t want to believe that you have to sex yourself up to find love. I never made that choice to change myself like that. Maybe my life would be easier if I had.”

Hatfield had a different interpretation of the punk ethos than some of her friends. For her, punk wasn’t defined by drugs and promiscuous sex; it was defined by staying true to one’s own moral code, whatever that was. That’s why Newton-John still made sense to her when she picked up a guitar and started playing punk rock, even persuading her high school cover band to add some X songs to a setlist dominated by Journey and Styx.

“Maybe it was in my DNA,” she suggests. “Maybe I had a punk heart; I didn’t want to do things because everyone else was doing them. I was impervious to peer pressure, and that isolated me a bit, because I wouldn’t give in and do what the other kids did. So I felt an affinity with Olivia, because she also had this good-girl curse. I felt like an outcast because all my friends in high school and college were doing drugs, getting drunk and having sex, but I didn’t want to. I was hanging out with these people, but it didn’t feel right to me; I wasn’t ready or interested. I knew I would do things on my own time line.”

It was in 1986 at Boston’s Berklee College of Music that she formed The Blake Babies with guitarist John Strohm and drummer Freda Boner. The Lemonheads’ Evan Dando was also briefly the group’s bassist, and when he left, Hatfield was persuaded to shift from guitar and emulate Dando’s unusually melodic bass lines. Even after she returned to guitar in 1994 with her own group, she ever after wrote tuneful, prominent parts for her bassists to contrast against her brittle guitar riffs. “I like melodic bass players like Evan and Paul McCartney,” she says. “I get bored holding down the bottom, and I love melody, so I played that way. The bass players I hire know what I like to hear. It frees up the guitar to not be so melodic. I always have some anxiety about my records becoming too monochrome or not grooving enough, and I always go to melody to fix things.”

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The Blake Babies were a delightful indie-rock outfit, but the trio eventually broke up as Hatfield wanted to further emphasize the pop elements in the group’s sound, a move her bandmates resisted.  Hatfield loved the vocal-harmony echoes of Newton-John she heard in hits like “Hold On,” but Strohm and Boner dismissed it as juvenile fluff. “When I left The Blake Babies,” she says, “I was miserable because I wanted to do my own thing, but I missed being in a gang—a band is like a gang that has your back. The other members are a cushion against criticism. But I wanted to have more control over the music; I wanted to be able to say, ‘This is how I want to do it, and that’s how we’re going to do it.”

Earlier this spring, American Laundromat Records released a remastered 25th anniversary vinyl edition of Hatfield’s debut solo album, 1992’s Hey Babe, in a gatefold package. With help from such friends as Dando, John Wesley Harding and Mike Watt, she crafted a new balance between the pop and rock elements in her music. The lead-off track, “Everybody Loves Me but You,” boasts a classic guitar riff, pitted against Hatfield’s rolling bass line, as she wails that the one person whose love she craves is the one person who won’t offer it.

The album got her a deal with Atlantic Records and led to her breakthrough album, 1993’s Become What You Are. “My Sister” hit No. 1 “Spin the Bottle” appeared on the soundtrack for the zeitgeist movie Reality Bites, and Hatfield wound up on the cover of Spin. “My Sister” is a magnificent achievement, using the phrases “I love my sister” and “I hate my sister” to capture the contradictory feelings we often have about the people closest to us. The fact that Hatfield didn’t actually have a sister hardly mattered, given the infectious hook and the evocative details about firecrackers and a Violent Femmes concert.

“I wasn’t trying to put one over on people; it was all about how I was feeling,” she explains. “I just wanted to express the pain I was in. The sister was a metaphor, a construct I used to express my feelings of longing and inadequacy.”

She made two more albums for Atlantic, one (Only Everything) that was released and one (God’s Foot) that never was. She has mostly worked under her own name, but she has also recorded as the Juliana Hatfield Three, Some Girls, Minor Alps, The I Don’t Cares and the reunited Blake Babies.

“A year and a half ago,” she recalls, “I was going to go see Olivia in concert for the first time, but she ended up canceling that string of shows because her cancer had come back. That’s when I decided to make the album. It was just an idea that popped into my mind, because I was immersed with her music again in preparation for the concert. Once we were in the studio, we found ourselves translating those well-written songs through this traditional unit of guitar, bass, drums and my weird voice. We did them as if they were songs we had written.”

“My love for Olivia’s music is not nostalgia,” Hatfield says, “because I still love it and get pleasure from it. There’s something about the timbre of her voice that homes in on my pleasure center. She was never desperately pleading for acceptance or attention from people like other pop stars were. She had this great solid core that is still very appealing to me; she felt very centered. So many stars come across as emotional messes, but she seemed like she really had her shit together.”

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Juliana Hatfield is back with 14 brand new songs, including the instant-classic “Wonder Why.” “I wasn’t planning on making a record,” says Juliana Hatfield of “Pussycat”. In fact, she thought her songwriting career was on hiatus, and that she had nothing left to say in song form; that she had finally said it all after two decades as a recording artist. But then the presidential election happened. “All of these songs just started pouring out of me. And I felt an urgency to record them, to get them down, and get them out there.”

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Pussycat is the kind of bluntly political record Hatfield used to be knocked for shying away from. At the height of her 1990s stardom, Hatfield was dismissed in the more activist corners of the music world as a lightweight (never mind that her songs frequently explored the ways society needles and dismisses women). She’s spent her career in an often thankless middle ground, too feminine for the masculine music press, yet not punk enough for the riot grrls. But Pussycat lends to the case for a critical reappraisal. Now would be an ideal time for one, given how the DNA of Hatfield’s hooky, plainspoken alterna-pop has carried through some of indie-rock’s sharpest young songwriters, from artists like Waxahatchee to Bully and Charly Bliss, artists that have demonstrated there’s plenty of substance in this sound. What a treat it would be if, 30 years into their careers, they were all making records as relevant, passionate, and strangely personable as this one.

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Love Is Love was written and recorded in the two months immediately following the election, but it’s not a record borne entirely of angry, knee-jerk reaction to what America is becoming. Instead, it’s a meditation on love, and on what life means now. Taking cues from last year’s City Sun Eater In The River Of Light, it feels very much like a record made from living, shoulder to shoulder, in a major city: weaving psychedelic swirls of guitar between languid horns reminiscent of the best Ethiopian jazz—Love is Love is a distinctly New York record. It is a document of protest in uncertain times and an open-hearted rejection of cynicism in favor of emotional honesty. It is bright, and then, unexpectedly, a little dark sometimes too.

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“Wisdom comes with age, so it’s no surprise that Woods have grown more sage in the twelve years since they formed, expanding from sylvan drum circles into increasingly elaborate, transcendent psychedelia.” – Pitchfork.

 

There will be parts of life where we will watch as events unfold and we will feel helpless. We will not be sure of the future. On good days, we’ll have each other. On the bad ones, we’ll turn to the art that helps us feel something. Love is Love is a document of the new world we live in, proof that light can come from despair and hope is still possible. We just need a little help remembering it exists.” –

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“I wasn’t planning on making a record,” says Juliana Hatfield, of her new “Pussycat” album. In fact, she thought her songwriting career was on hiatus, and that she had nothing left to say in song form; that she had finally said it all after two decades as a recording artist. But then the presidential election happened. “All of these songs just started pouring out of me. And I felt an urgency to record them, to get them down, and get them out there.” She booked some time at Q Division studios in Somerville, Massachusetts near her home in Cambridge and went in with a drummer (Pete Caldes), an engineer (Pat DiCenso) and fourteen brand-new songs.

Hatfield produced and played every instrument other than drums—bass, keyboards, guitars, vocals. From start to finish—recording through mixing—the whole thing took a total of just twelve and a half days to complete.“It was a blur. It was cathartic,” says Hatfield. “I almost don’t even understand what happened in there, or how it came together so smoothly, so quickly. I was there, directing it all, managing it, getting it all done, but I was being swept along by some force that was driving me. The songs had a will, they forced themselves on me, or out of me, and I did what they told me to do. Even my hands—it felt like they were not my hands. I played bass differently– looser, more confident, better.” Pussycat comes on the heels of last year’s Hatfield collaboration with Paul Westerberg, the I Don’t Cares’ Wild Stab album, and before that, 2015’s Juliana Hatfield Three (My Sister, Spin The Bottle) reunion/reformation album, Whatever, My Love. “I’ve always been prolific and productive and I have a good solid work ethic but this one happened so fast, I didn’t have time to think or plan,” says Hatfield. “I just went with it, rode the wave. And now it is out of my hands. It feels a little scary.” Pussycat is being released into a very tense, divided and inflamed America. The songs are reflective of that atmosphere—angry (When You’re A Star), defiant (Touch You Again), disgusted (Rhinoceros), but also funny (Short-Fingered Man), reflective (Wonder Why), righteous (Heartless) and even hopeful (Impossible Song, with its chorus of ‘What if we tried to get along/and sing an impossible song’).

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Eighteen months on from debut album, The Fire Inside comes Time Is A Riddle, the second album Luke Sital-Singh was determined to make solely on his terms. No interference, no scheduling issues, nor elaborate musicianship, nothing big or brittle. Just care, and effort, and time well spent – values he shares with the Slow Movement to which he subscribes, and with the crafts people up and down the country with whom the musician has some special projects planned. It’s a lovely record of self-written songs, a crafted distillation of the ideas and tastes that have been percolating through Sital-Singh since he was a teenager in suburban southwest London.

Having written a brace of songs – simple songs that moved him – Sital-Singh followed his long-held artist’s dream: he escaped to a remote studio, Attica Audio, in Donegal, with nothing on his mind other than making the record of his life. The studio’s owner, producer Tommy McLaughlin (a member of Villagers’ touring band, who Sital-Singh has opened for) pulled together a small group of musicians. Well-used to playing together, the band slotted together effortlessly for a series of recordings over ten days. Time Is A Riddle is a record where you can smell the graft, see the joins and hear the sweat on the frets – and the occasional live-recording misstep. It’s that real. Luke Sital-Singh wouldn’t have it any other way.

Pwr bttm pageant

On PWR BTTM’s new album Pageant, glammed and glittered duo Ben Hopkins and Liv Bruce tackle their diary-like explorations of life, identity and existential crises head-on. Pageant is a vital exploration of self that’s hot with friction, angst and hope, both hilarious and heart wrenching.

Pageant is ferociously emotional, with passionate narratives set to cutting rock and roll anthems. The album builds upon PWR BTTM’s sensational debut Ugly Cherries with a further refined song craft and sonic flourishes including horns, flutes, keyboard and even an impromptu choir. The result is thirteen original songs that burst with laughter, tears and triumph. Pageant was produced by Christopher Daly and Cameron West, and was recorded primarily in the top floor of a furniture factory in Geneva, New York. Ben Hopkins takes his guitar playing and vocal fierceness to new heights, and with newfound openness. The duo swap instruments on the record and live, constantly alternating between Hopkins’ finger-picking solos and Liv Bruce’s tremendous drumming.

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Hazel English is a 25-year-old Oakland-based artist who makes beautifully blurry indie-pop music powered by transcendent melodies and caked in layers of Californian sunshine and redolent reverb. She finds herself something of a scene queen amidst the burgeoning jangling happenings of the Bay Area, which count the likes of her producer Jackson Philips aka Day Wave amongst it ranks, as well as kindred spirits like Craft Spells and Hot Flash Heat Wave, to name but a few. Despite the fun being had locally, Hazel describes her music as, “Transportive. It makes you feel like you’re in a different place”. A very literal example is the title track, which charters the bittersweet abandon of her runaway journey from her native Australia to her new adopted home in an near-cinematic narrative. She’s drawn comparisons to everyone from Alvvays and Pains Of Being Pure At Heart to touring partners Ride, while her soaring, hypnotic, vocal arrangements have been likened to everyone from Grimes to Diiv.

2LP – Double LP on Pastel Pink and Pastel Blue Vinyl.

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Manic Street Preachers’ eighth studio album Send Away The Tigers celebrates its tenth anniversary in May and to mark the occasion a 10 Year Collectors’ Edition of the album packed with unheard music, unseen footage and artwork from the band’s own archive is released.

3CD – 2CD / DVD folio book featuring the original album remastered by James Dean Bradfield, a second disc of b-sides and rarities and a DVD including the band’s full 2007 Glastonbury performance plus previously unseen rehearsal footage, an album track-by-track and promo videos. This comes packaged with a beautiful folio book of artwork and handwritten lyric sheets from Nicky Wire’s personal archive alongside photos and liner notes.

2LP – Double gatefold heavyweight vinyl, featuring a remastered edition of the album alongside demos recorded at Faster Studios and at the band’s homes. The vinyl release includes download codes for the album and demos.

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2017, marks the 40th anniversary of Paul Weller’s first album, In The City, which he released with The Jam in May 1977. For most artists such a landmark would be greeted with extensive retrospective celebrations: lavish reissues and all that jazz. But Paul Weller is not like most artists, instead releasing a new studio album, because releasing new albums is what Paul Weller does. Always moving forwards, almost clinically averse to nostalgia or checking his progress in the rear-view mirror. And so, continuing his never-ending creative peak, Paul Weller releases his eagerly awaited 13th studio album A Kind Revolution on Parlophone Records.

Weller started work on A Kind Revolution immediately after finishing 2015’s Saturns Pattern, first tickling out the funky strut of New York and the beautiful slow-mo gospel of The Cranes Are Back – a song that ties in the changing face of London with the power of nature. The album’s title is taken from a line in the aforementioned song. Musicians on the album feature most of the touring band faithful with Andy Crofts and Ben Gordelier being the top mainstays. Steve Cradock and Steve Pilgrim also feature on several tracks. Opening track Woo Sé Mama sees legendary soul singers PP Arnold and Madeleine Bell supply their distinctive vocal skills while the exceedingly funky One Tear features the unmistakable voice of the one and only Boy George. Paul even managed to lure Robert Wyatt out of retirement to sing and play trumpet on She Moves With The Fayre. Finally, and once again, The Strypes’ guitarist Josh McClorey has been drafted in to add his magic to 3 tracks.

A Kind Revolution features ten absolute classic modern Paul Weller songs. By “modern Paul Weller songs” we mean, instantly recognisable but in no way predictable. He doesn’t make a “kind of” album, he fits together all his influences – rock, R&B, soul, jazz, funk, folk…whatever – and builds a song from them, delivering something that drifts through genres un-selfconsciously and at ease. Two great examples of this are two of the most reflective, contemplative songs, Long Long Road and Hopper, which in lesser hands might have been delivered as ballads, but Weller adds so much texture and colour to each that they defy categorisation. With great age comes great wisdom. Written and recorded at de facto HQ, Black Barn Studios in Surrey, A Kind Revolution was produced and arranged by Jan ‘Stan’ Kybert and Paul himself.

CD – 10-track album in Gatefold card wallet with lyric booklet.

3CD – 8-panel fold-out card wallet containing the original 10-track album A Kind Revolution, plus a bonus CD featuring instrumental versions of A Kind Revolution and a third CD with remixes / alternate versions of A Kind Revolution tracks and another brand new track, Alpha. Also includes a booklet containing album lyrics.

LP – On heavyweight black vinyl, housed in a Gatefold sleeve with lyric booklet, art print and a download card with access to MP3s of the 10-track album.

10″ – Deluxe rigid board box set with lift-off lid containing A Kind Revolution pressed up on 5 x pieces of 10” black vinyl with individual artwork. Includes 10” art print, lyric booklet and download card to access MP3s of all 29 tracks from Deluxe formats of the album.

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Limited to 500 Copies on Seafoam Green Vinyl with Vaughan Oliver and Chris Bigg’s artwork beautifully repurposed in a shiny gold mirror board sleeve. Ask Me Tomorrow has been unavailable on vinyl since its release on 4AD in October, 1995 and original copies now change hands for three-figure sums. The reissue is timely as it follows the recent announcement of Slowdive’s fourth album, and this could well have been that record, but after being dropped by Creation following the release of Pygmalion, the band – reduced to a three-piece of Neil Halstead, Rachel Goswell and Ian McCutcheon – rechristened themselves Mojave 3 and experimented with stripped-down, acoustic songs more in thrall to Leonard Cohen than LFO. As a result, Ask Me Tomorrow is essentially Slowdive Unplugged; a special record, with a unique, hushed grandeur all of its own. For fans of Nick Drake, Townes Van Zandt and Gram Parsons.

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Girlpool made their mark with a spare, simple sound – two guitars and two voices, with absolutely nothing else accompanying them. It was an original, intimate sound, and it made the two sound like they were united against the rest of the world. But on their new album, Powerplant, they’re trying something else. They’re playing with a full band. Over 10 days in August 2016, Girlpool holed up at Los Angeles’ comp-ny studios to record and mix Powerplant with Drew Fischer. For the first time, Harmony and Cleo were joined by a third performer, drummer Miles Wintner, a friend who easily meshed with the tightknit duo. The 12 tracks that compose Powerplant grow and burn with greater fire than the duo have possessed heretofore. Both bandmates were heavily inspired by Elliott Smith, the Cranberries, the Cocteau Twins, Brian Eno, Arthur Russell, and Graham Nash; the influence of each appear in the record’s deliberate and intricate guitar work (Fast Dust, She Goes By) as well as its embrace of dissonant noise (Corner Store, Soup). Perhaps what really makes Powerplant a home run is that Girlpool understand exactly how to use their incisive lyrics, soft textures, hushed harmonies, and soaring hooks for maximum emotional impact. In these moments, when Harmony and Cleo’s voices join together to deliver transcendent transmissions straight from their hearts, Girlpool become a league of their own.

LP+ – Translucent red vinyl with Download – 300 copies.

LP – Black Vinyl with Download.

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Nomad stands as Martha Tilston’s most compelling work to date, an album full of experimentation and impulse. Across the album, musical arrangements realm from the pinhead intimacy of acoustic guitar and voice to the expansive electric guitar, slide guitar, rolling beats, deep bass, banjo and string arrangements. There are subtle undertones of old country music flittering throughout, suggestions of rock and pop and a good dose of stripped back acoustic cinema for the listener to submerge in. Recorded in Cornwall, Martha and her frequent collaborators Matt Tweed, Nick Marshall and Tim Cotterell, amongst other new faces, would pick up instruments in the late hours and the outcome of these sessions arising from spontaneity, experimentation and maturing songwriting was to become Nomad. Martha Tilston has grown up immersed in music from a young age. Her singer-songwriter father Steve Tilston and the late Maggie Boyle (step-mother) were obvious influences, with their musician friends Bert Jansch, John Rebourn and John Martyn often gathering and singing in the family kitchen.

Martha’s own musical journey has taken her from the Acoustic Stage at Glastonbury to touring the far reaches of the globe. Originally one-half of folk duo Mouse (alongside Nick Marshall), Martha often shared the stage with the likes of Kate Tempest and Damien Rice before earning a nomination from the BBC for best newcomer and featuring on the Zero 7 album, Yeah Ghost.

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Concord release Thank You Friends: Big Star’s Third Live…and more celebrating the musical legacy of one of rock’s most influential bands – Big Star– and their legendary Third album. Experience this classic of late ’70s power pop through the prism of a collective of immensely talented fans, including members of Wilco, R.E.M., Yo La Tengo, and, of course, Big Star. Following the untimely death of Alex Chilton two days ahead of Big Star’s SXSW performance in 2010, famous friends and fans came from far and wide to play the gig in his honour. Much of that spontaneous ensemble, along with other musical titans, assembled at Glendale, CA’s Alex Theatre in April 2016 to record and film an epic performance.

2CD – Stand Alone Double CD.

3CD – Double CD and DVD Version.

3CD+ – Double CD and Blu-Ray Version

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Its great to be able to share Juliana Hatfield’s awesome video for “Short-Fingered Man” from her upcoming album “Pussycat”.

“For this video I shot a bunch of footage of myself in my hallway. I love sixties dancing so I did a bunch of that. Also I was thinking of early Jean Rollin vampire movies and of “Alphaville” (Godard) and those scenes near the end in which Anna Karina–and other residents of Alphaville–start to lose their equilibrium in the hallway and can’t keep themselves walking in a straight line. Caroline Jaecks took all of my footage and masterfully constructed a neat little narrative out of it that fits the song really well.”

American Laundromat Records

The election of President Donald Trump has kicked Juliana Hatfield into action. On April 28th, she will release “Pussycat”, a new record inspired by the current political climate in the U.S.
“I wasn’t planning on making a record,” she said in a press release. But after the election, she continued, “All of these songs just started pouring out of me. And I felt an urgency to record them, to get them down, and get them out there.”
Hatfield wrote the material following a time in which she was questioning whether or not she had anything left to say as a songwriter. So, as quickly as the songs came, she wanted to record them in a similar manner. Playing all the instruments except drums, which were played by Pete Caldes, she recorded and mixed all 14 songs in 12-and-a-half days.
“It was a blur. It was cathartic,” she said. “I almost don’t even understand what happened in there, or how it came together so smoothly, so quickly. I was there, directing it all, managing it, getting it all done, but I was being swept along by some force that was driving me. The songs had a will, they forced themselves on me, or out of me, and I did what they told me to do. Even my hands — it felt like they were not my hands. I played bass differently — looser, more confident, better. I’ve always been prolific and productive and I have a good solid work ethic but this one happened so fast, I didn’t have time to think or plan. I just went with it, rode the wave. And now it is out of my hands. It feels a little scary.”

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You can order Pussycat at American Laundromat Records’ website, with options of CD, pink cassette (limited to 250 copies), pink vinyl and a coupled of bundles that offer it on both pink and peach vinyl.
Juliana Hatfield, ‘Pussycat’

Track Listing
1. “I Wanna Be Your Disease”
2. “Impossible Song”
3. “You’re Breaking My Heart”
4. “When You’re a Star”
5. “Good Enough for Me”
6. “Short-Fingered Man”
7. “Touch You Again”
8. “Sex Machine”
9. “Wonder Why”
10. “Sunny Somewhere”
11. “Kellyanne”
12. “Heartless”
13. “Rhinoceros”
14. “Everything Is Forgiven”

According to an interview Paul Westerberg these are a bunch of songs/demos Westerberg had laying around his basement studio. Inertia had set-in and it took Hatfield to pick out some of the gems and help whip them into shape. If true, the collaboration has made for the best Westerberg release in ages. If you liked the harder stuff on “All Shook Down” or “14 Songs” you’ll dig this – lots of stonesy rock-with a tender side (“Whole Lotta Nothin’,” “Born to Me”).

It’s not a quite a “band” but Westerberg sounds really fantastic working in collaboration with Juliana Hatfield. A supremely enjoyable and impactful album. Lots of great songs here. A few tunes put Hatfield’s voice at the front,

Paul westerberg Harp Magazine

“I’m back if you’ll have me” — after too many years since a proper album this is a great and emotional album opener.

Born For Me – what was a slow piano ballad from a Westerberg solo release is rerecorded here as a joyous rock and roll song and it is fantastic. So fun and happy.

Kissing Break — the heartfelt performance here elevates what could have been a light and inconsequential throw away to something unique and beautiful. In a way it reminds me how “Dyslexic Heart” might have first seemed like just a fun song to place on a movie soundtrack, but the kept popping up all over the place for the past two decades.

Outta My System — another re-recorded Westerberg song, and again it’s way better than the original in every way. So deceptively simple it’s amazing how compelling it is.

Hands Together  An epic song. One of Paul’s best songs ever, imaginative and metaphorical and gut wrenching and uplifting. So good it is hard to put into words.

In between are 11 more great rock and roll songs full of life and enthusiasm. It all manages to immediately fit into Westerberg’s catalog and still sound new. This is among his best post-Replacements work and might prove to be one of his best overall releases

 

Juliana Hatfield dedicated an entire chapter of her 2008 book “When I Grow up”: A Memoir to Paul Westerberg, and in interviews, she frequently talks about his and the Replacements’ influence on her. She was asked to open for Westerberg on a solo tour after the Replacements broke up, but the tour ended up being cancelled after he threw out his back. Now, however, they’re finally in a band together, The I Don’t Cares, and they released their debut album, “Wild Stab”,

Wild Stab is a jangly, jaunty, lo-fi sprawl. Its 16 tracks sound slapped together with a healthy coat of Mod Podge, delivered straight from a basement studio. Some songs sound remarkably similar to each other, while others stick out at odd angles. It’s as if fussing over an album would’ve made it seem too much like a “statement”; instead, Wild Stab just feels like a couple of pals rockin’ out and having fun, but not worrying too much about the final product. That’s not to say that these songs are anything less than professional — Hatfield and Westerberg are too good to drop any stinkers. This is largely Westerberg’s show, with Hatfield mostly harmonizing her way through. But the result is just as smooth, an album as fun to listen to as it likely was to make.

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Juliana Hatfield covers “Needle In The Hay” for “Say Yes! A Tribute To Elliott Smith” due out October 14th 2016.

A number of indie music’s finest are coming together to pay homage to Elliott Smith with a new tribute album on October 14th. Titled  Say Yes! A Tribute to Elliott Smith, the 15-track collection sees artists like  J.Mascis,Waxahatchee, Lou Barlow, Juliana Hatfield, and Yuck tackle songs from across the late singer-songwriter’s discography. The American Laundromat Records release also features a collaborative cover of “Condor Avenue” by Jesu and Sun Kil Moon.

check out Hatfield’s rendition of “Needle in the Hay”. The track is the only non-exclusive cover on Say Yes! (it had originally appeared on American Laundromat’s 2014 Wes Anderson tribute LP).